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AESCHYLUS. Tragédies d'Eschyle. (Traduites par Jean-Jacques Le Franc de Pompignan). Paris, Chez Sailland & Nyon, 1770. 8vo. (IV),XXXV,546 p. Calf 20 cm 'The spell cast by Aeschylus continues to capture readers and theater audiences.' (Ref: Hoffmann I,50; Cioranescu no. 38648; Brunet 1,81; Moss 1,15: 'assez fidèle'; Ebert 206) (Details: Contemporary French binding, showing an elaborately gilt back with leaflike motives, and an orange morocco gilt letterpiece. Woodcut printer's mark on the title: a lyre, laurel branches and 2 trumpets, with an intertwining banner reading: 'Haec praebet munera Phoebus'. Edges dyed red) (Condition: Corners bumped. Bookplate tipped in on the front pastedown. Head of the spine slightly rubbed) (Note: This is the first complete translation of the surviving plays of Aeschylus in French. The 'préface' includes a 'vie d'Eschyle'. Each tragedy is preceded by an introduction. They were translated by the now forgotten French lyrical poet Jean Jacques Lefranc, marquis de Pompignan, 1709-1784. He was a bibliophile, and collected 26 000 volumes of which 1500 musical scores. He was a member of the 'Académie Française', where he showed up only once. His work may be forgotten, but he is remembered as a victim of the sarcasms of Voltaire in several of his pamphlets and satires. This earned him a monography: Th.E.D. Braun, 'Jean Jacques Le Franc, un ennemi de Voltaire', Paris 1971) § The Greek tragedian Aeschylus, 525/4-456 B.C., is the earliest of the surviving tragic playwrights, who 'can be considered the 'inventor' of tragedy as we understand it'. (The Classical Tradition, N.Y., 2010, p. 10) He became an instant classic in his time. In Byzantine times seven of his plays, the so called heptas, continued to be copied and studied, but in the West he was forgotten for almost one and a half thousand years. In the Renaissance he was revived with the arrival Greek manuscripts in the West, and by the printing press. The oldest of the more than 100 surviving Aeschylean manuscripts dates from ca. 1000, and was written in Constantinople. It was brougth to Florence by the Italian humanist G. Ausrispa. Aeschylus was published by Aldus in Venice in 1513. It was only in the late 18th century that Aeschylus was translated in French, German and French. 'From that time forward, interest in Aeschylus blossomed. The character of his language and thought (...) formerly a stumbling block, became a virtue for the new Romantic sensibility, aided perhaps by the fact that the Age of Revolution saw the Aeschylean Prometheus as the archetypal hero of defiance. In this regard the 'continuation' of Prometheus Bound by Herder (Der entfesselte Prometheus, 1802; choruses set to music by Liszt, 1850-1855) and Shelley (Prometheus Unbound, 1820) are of particular importance'. (Op. cit.) In the play Zeus is represented as a harsh and unjust tyrant) (Provenance: Modern bookplate, 3 naked women surround the text 'Ex libris Dr. A. Jann') (Collation: pi2, A-2N8 2O4 (leaf 2O4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130204 Euro 150,00
ALBERTUS MAGNUS. Alberti Magni Paradisus Animae, De virtutibus, lib. I. Eiusdem De adherendo Deo, lib. I. Ad veterum doctorum exemplaria emendati, & restituti. (Edited by Petrus Velius). Bologna (Bononiae), Typis HH. Evangelistae de Ducciis, 1663. 16mo. 221,(2 index) p. Contemporary boards. 11 cm (Ref: Very rare. Not one copy in KVK; not one copy of this edition in Italian libraries. Not in Brunet, nor in Ebert) (Details: Contemporary thick & stiff paper binding, with 2 leather thongs through the joints. Short title in ink on the back. Woodcut ornament on the title) (Condition: Back worn at the extremes and slightly scuffed) (Note: Albertus Magnus, 1193-1280, became doctor and magister in Paris, and was considered to be the most learned man of his age. He tried to synthesize Christian doctrine and Aristotelian thought. When this 'doctor universalis' was teaching in Cologne from 1248-1254 Thomas Aquinas was one of his pupils. § Edition with the authorization of the Bishop & Princeps of Bologna Hieronymus Boncompagno. In the short dedication at the beginning of the text, dated 1663, the editor reveals himself, 'Petrus Velius S.F.' Little is known about him. He translated a treatise of the Bolognese philosopher and founder of graphology Camillo Baldo 'De Ratione cognoscendi Mores & qualitates Scribentis ex ipsius Epistola Missiva', Bologna 1664. He was a nephew of Baldo) (Collation: A - O8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120032 Euro 300,00
AMMIANUS MARCELLINUS. Ammiani Marcellini Rerum gestarum qui de XXXI. supersunt libri XVIII. Ad fidem MS. & veterum Codd. recensiti, & Observationibus illustrati. Ex. bibliotheca. Fr. Lindenbrogii (&:) Fr. Lindenbrogii Observationes in Ammianum Marcellinum; et in eundem Collectanea variarum lectionum. Hamburg (Hamburgi), Ex Bibliopolio Frobeniano, 1609. 4to. 2 volumes in 1: (VI),504 (recte 502),(49);276,(1 errata) p. Overlapping vellum. 21.5 cm (Ref: VD17 23:230328M; Schweiger 2,3: 'Neue Rezension nach Mss, besonders trefflichen Florentiner Codex'; Dibdin I,256: 'very excellent edition, the basis of many following ones'; Moss 1,38; Ebert 527; Graesse 1,104) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints. Short title in ink on the back. Woodcut printers' mark on the title, it depicts a gardener planting a tree, the motto is 'Posteritati'. Some woodcut initials and headpieces. Edges dyed red) (Condition: Binding soiled & scratched. Name on the front flyleaf. Paper age-toned. Lacks owing to a binder's error the last preliminary leaf (*4), with on the recto side the last page of the 'praefatio' and a blank verso side; of this missing leaf a photocopy is added) (Note: Ammianus Marcellinus, ca. 330-400 AD, was a Greek who served as a high officer in the Roman army. He carried arms under the emperors Constantius, Julian and Valens. His work 'Res Gestae', meant to continue the work of the Roman historian Tacitus, describes the history of Rome from Nerva till the downfall of the emperor Valens in 378 in 31 books. In combining history and biography he follows his example. The first 13 books of the 'Res Gestae' are lost. What is left begins with book 14, the year 353. 'Ammianus' Gesammtleistung reiht ihn unter die grossen Historiker Roms ein'. (Neue Pauly, I col. 598) His style is not polished, but rather harsh and obscure, the style of a soldier and a Greek. ('Haec ut miles quondam & Graecus (..) exorsus', Liber 31) It should also be remembered that he wrote Latin in a period when most historical works were destitute of elegance. Still, the work is valuable for its veracity. § This 1609 edition with commentary, produced by the German legal and classical scholar Friedrich Lindenbrog, 1573-1648, is the first edition which the Dutch scholar P. de Jonge mentions in the short list of normative Ammianus editions in the latest multi volume Groningen Ammianus edition, a project that was started in 1972 and is still in progress. The first part of this edition of 1609 contains the Latin text, and the second part 266 pages with the 'observationes' and a collection of 'varia lectiones'. § Sandys reports that Lindenbrog was a citizen of Hamburg, and was influenced by the genius J.J. Scaliger. (Sandys II,364) He studied in Leiden, and before this lawyer/philologist started a lucrative legal practice, he produced a number of editions of Latin authors, among them Statius, Ammianus & Terentius, works that are still to be consulted nowadays. (ADB 18, 692/93) There exist 2 versions of this edition, the text is the same, but the number of preliminary leaves differs. Ours has 3 preliminary leaves, but there are also copies with 7 preliminary leaves (VD17 1:687728). The latter edition shows also some small differences on the title, 'I.V.L' (Iuris Utriusque Licentiatus) is added to the name of Lindenbrog, and the impressum says 'in Bibliopolio Frobeniano', instead of 'ex Bibliopolio Frobeniano') (Provenance: On the front flyleaf the ownership entry of 'A.D. van Regteren Altena, Bergen') (Collation: *4 (minus leaf *4; leaf *2 blank); A-3Z4, A-2M4 (last leaf blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130025 Euro 370,00
AMMONIUS. AMMÔNIOU peri Homoiôn kai Diaphorôn lekseôn. De adfinium vocabulorum differentia. Accedunt opuscula nondum edita, Eranius Philo 'de Differentia Significationis'. Lesbonax 'de figuris grammaticis'. Incerti scriptores 'de soloecismo & barbarismo'. Lexicon 'de spiritibus dictionum, ex operibus' Tryphonis, Choerobosci, Theodoriti, etc. selectum. Ammonium, ope MS. primae editionis Aldinae, & aliunde, emaculavit & notis illustravit, reliqua ex codd. MSS. Bibliothecae Lugduno-Batavae nunc primum vulgavit Ludovicus Casparus Valckenaer. (Bound with:) Ludov. Casp. Valckenaer. Animadversionum ad Ammonium grammaticum libri tres. In quibus veterum scriptorum loca tentantur & emendantur. Accedit specimen scholiorum ad Homerum ineditorum, ex codice Vossiano Bibliothecae Lugduno-Batavae. Leiden (Lugduno Batavorum), Apud Johannem Luzac, 1739. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: (VIII),XXXI,(3),264; (VIII),249,(15 index),(2 blank) p. Vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,125; Brunet 1,239; Ebert 536; Graesse 1,105) (Details: Six thongs laced through the joints. Both titles printed in red & black. Engraved printer's mark on title, designed by F. v. Bleyswyck, depicting a ship heading for Scylla and Charybdis; its motto: 'nec dextrorsum, nec sinistrorsum', or 'Neither to the right nor to the left', referring to Deuteronomium ch. V,32/33: 'Custodite igitur et facite quae praecepit Dominus Deus vobis: non declinabitis neque ad dexteram, neque ad sinistram: sed per viam, quam praecepit Dominus Deus vester, ambulabitis, ut vivatis, et bene sit vobis, et protelentur dies in terra possesionis vestrae') (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and slightly soiled. Small name on the title. Old ink inscription on the front flyleaf. Front hinge cracking, but strong; paper of pastedowns cracking) (Note: The Frisian scholar Lodewijk Caspar Valckenaer, 1715-1785, was a pupil of his fellow Frisian Tiberius Hemsterhuis, and after him the greatest Dutch classical scholar of the 18th century. Hemsterhuis, 1685-1766, advised his students in Franeker and later in Leiden, to use especially the lexica of the ancient lexicographers. These works could be of great use for the understanding of textual problems and for the amending of texts of classical authors, and they were of great help to gain a profound knowledge of the Greek language and its vocabulary. For his first fruits Valckenaer chose an unpublished work of the Greek grammarian Ammonius, who lived probably in the first or second century A.D. This edition, the 'editio princeps' of 'De adfinium vocabulorum differentia' made his name. In the preface Valckenaer explains that Ammonius suffered grievous wrongs at the hand of French scholar/printer Henri Estienne who ignored his usefulness in the appendix of his celebrated 'Thesaurus Linguae Graecae' (1572), and who vexed and lacerated him in the preface of his 'De Atticae linguae seu dialecti idiomatis' (1573), and portrayed the ancient lexicographer as a careless ignoramus. ('omnibus modis Ammonium vexavit, & tam contumeliose laceravit, ut, in Ammonio exemplum & incuriae & inscitiae ponendum esse'. Praefatio p. XXV) Young Valckenaer announces that he is going to repair this 'gravissimam iniuriam'. For Valckenaer it is clear (liquido constet), that Ammonius penetrated deep into the nature of the Greek language and the true origin of words. (in interiorem Linguae indolem & veram vocum originem reliquis grammaticis omnibus ignoratam, sese penetravisse Ammonium') (Idem, eodem) The first part consists of the work of Ammonius and several other unpublished ancient grammatici, the second part consists of Valckenaer's notes on Ammonius, and a specimen of the scholia from the 'codex Vossianus'. The untertaking proved to be successful, because it resulted in his appointment as professor of Greek at the University of Franeker in 1741. (Gerretzen, Schola Hemsterhusiana, 1940, p. 205/6) (Collation: *-5*4, A-2K4; +4, A-2K4 (leaf 2K4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130008 Euro 490,00
ANTONINUS LIBERALIS ANTÔNINOU LIBERALIS METAMORPHÔSEÔN SUNAGÔGÊ. Antonini Liberalis transformationum congeries, interprete Guilielmo Xylandro. Cum Thomae Munckeri notis, quibus suas adjecit Henricus Verheyk. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Sam. et Joan. Luchtmans, 1774. 8vo. XXXII,304,(19) p. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 193: 'Am Ende befindet sich ein bedeutender Excurs: De dialectis in Antonino Liberal. obviis'; Ebert 752; Graesse 1,154; Brunet 1,330: 'cette édition était la meilleure avant celle de 1832'; Spoelder, p. 545: Dordrecht 2) (Details: Prize copy, including the printed prize. 5 thongs laced through the joints. Backstrip panelled in gilt with repeated floral motives. Brown morocco shield in the second 'compartment'. Boards with gilt borders and cornerpieces. Gilt coat of arms of Dordrecht in the centre of the boards. Woodcut printer's mark on title: 'Tuta sub Aegide Pallas'. Paper of excellent quality. Greek text with facing Latin translation, notes on the lower half of the pages) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled. Bookplate on the front pastedown. All four ties gone) (Note: Antoninus Liberalis was an ancient Greek grammarian/mythographer, probably of Antonine times (AD 100 and 200). His only surviving work, the 'Metamorphoseon synagoge', (collection of metamorphoses) survives in a single manuscript of the later ninth century, now in the Palatine Library in Heidelberg; it contains 41 briefly summarised tales about mythical metamorphoses effected by offended deities, unique in that they are couched in prose, not verse. Many of the transformations in this compilation are found nowhere else, and some may simply be inventions of Antoninus. The manner of the narrative is a laconic and conversational prose. (Source Wikipedia). § The German philologist Wilhelm Xylander (Holzmann), 1532-1576, was professor of Greek at Heidelberg. He published the 'editio princeps' of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (1558), and of Antoninus Liberalis in 1568. 'He made good use of the MSS accessible to him, and also gave proof of a singular acumen in the emendation of texts'. (Sandys 2,270). § The Dutch schoolmaster Thomas Muncker, or Munckerus, who was Rector of the Schola Latina of Delft from 1667 till 1680, produced an edition with his notes in 1676. Saxe called him 'cathedra Academica dignissimus' (Van der Aa, 12/2, 1148). He is best known for his edition of the 'Mythographi Latini', Amst. 1681. § Johan Hendrik Verheyk, (Verheijk), Dutch schoolmaster, 1725-1784. He was Rector in Amsterdam. (Eckstein 589). He also produced a nice edition of Eutropius in 1762) (Provenance: The prize is for Engelbert Olivier, dated winter 1817, and signed by the Rector G. Fenema and the school officials of Dordrecht. In the 'Algemeen Handelsblad' of 11 May 1838 we found a short notice of the appointment by His Majesty the King to the post of Burgomaster of 'Everdingen, Zijderveld en Tienhoven' of one Engelbertus Olivier Azn. This was no success, two years later, in 1840, he was sacked, and sued for the unlawful demolishing in august 1839 of 4 habitated houses in his municipality. (See notice in 'Arnhemsche Courant' of 11-2-1840) § Name in ink on the front flyleaf: 'Margadant, 1914'. There are two classical trained persons who bear that name: Petrus Cornelis Margadant, who wrote a dissertation 'De Luciano aequalium suorum censore', The Hague, 1881, and one Steven Willem Floris Margandant, who wrote a dissertation 'De psychologie van het Grieksche werkwoord. Beschouwing over oorsprong en betekenis der vervoeging', The Hague, 1929) (Collation: *-2*8, A-V8, X2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130006 Euro 240,00
ANTONINUS LIBERALIS. ANTÔNINOU LIBERALIS METAMORPHÔSEÔN SUNAGÔGÊ. Antonini Liberalis Transformationum congeries, interprete Guilielmo Xylandro. Thomas Munckerus recensuit, & notas adjecit. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Apud Janssonio-Waesbergios, 1676. 12mo. (XXXVI),339,(33) p., frontispiece. Overlapping vellum. 13 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,193; Willems 1894, Bergman 1894, Rahir 2565; Ebert 750: 'A new and good recension'; Graesse 1,154) (Details: 6 thongs laced through cover; edges died blue, woodcut printer's mark on title; Greek text with facing Latin translation; at the end of each chapter the commentary) (Condition: Frontispiece dustsoiled) (Note: Antoninus Liberalis was an ancient Greek grammarian/mythographer, probably of Antonine times (AD 100 and 200). His only surviving work, the 'Metamorphoseon synagoge', (collection of metamorphoses) survives in a single manuscript of the later ninth century, now in the Palatine Library in Heidelberg; it contains 41 briefly summarised tales about mythical metamorphoses effected by offended deities, unique in that they are couched in prose, not verse. Many of the transformations in this compilation are found nowhere else, and some may simply be inventions of Antoninus. The manner of the narrative is a laconic and conversational prose. (Source Wikipedia). The German philologist Wilhelm Xylander (Holzmann), 1532-1576, was professor of Greek at Heidelberg. He published the editio princeps of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (1558), and of Antoninus Liberalis in 1568. 'He made good use of the MSS accessible to him, and also gave proof of a singular acumen in the emendation of texts'. (Sandys 2,270). The Dutch schoolmaster Thomas Muncker, or Munckerus, was Rector of the Schola Latina of Delft from 1667 till 1680. Our edition of 1676 is the first edition with his notes. Saxe called him 'cathedra Academica dignissimus'. (Van der Aa, 12/2, 1148) He is best known for his edition of the 'Mythographi Latini', Amsterdam 1681. In the Mythographi Latini we find his portrait) (Collation: *12 2*6, A-P12 Q6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120036 Euro 300,00
APOLLODORUS ATHENIENSIS. APOLLODÔROU TOU ATHÊNAIOU BIBLIOTHÊKÊS, ê peri theôn BIBLIA G'. Apollodori Atheniensis Bibliotheces, sive de Diis libri tres. Tanaquillus Faber recensuit & notulas addidit. Saumur (Salmurii), Apud Ioannem Lenerium, 1661. 4to. (IV),(II),289,(1 blank) p. Vellum 17 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,199; Dibdin 1,272: 'an accurate edition'; Moss 1,63; Brunet 1,344/45; Ebert 802; Graesse 1,162) (Details: 2 thongs laced throught the joints. Short title on the back. Title in red and black. Woodcut printer's mark of Jean Lesnier on the title, a flying eagle (?) with a banner, motto 'movendo'. A remarkable feature of this book is the preservation of a cancelled leaf. The book contains immediately after the title two short dedications, which are the same except for the heading. Tanaquillus Faber dedicates the book first to 'N. de Roche-Choüart illustri comiti Lemovicensi', and on the following leaf to 'Illustri Comiti Lemovicensi de Roche-Choüart'. The only difference is the word order and the absence/presence of the 'N', the first letter of the count's christian name. The paper quality of the second dedication is visibly better than the rest of the book, so we must conclude that the second dedication was added, and that the first should have been cancelled. Perhaps it was thought to be improper to address the count of the Limousin with his christian name) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Back very slightly damaged. Paper yellowing) (Note: Is this manual a schoolbook, a popularizing work transmitting mythological knowledge, or a work of erudition? The 'Library', a late antique work on Greek mythology, is nowadays attributed to one 'Pseudo-Apollodorus'. In his dissertation of 1873 the German classical scholar Carl Robert proved that this work cannot be identified or derived from any work of the Alexandrian scholar Apollodorus Atheniensis, who was born ca. 180 B.C. in Athens. Already the Dutch 17th century classical scholar Isaac Vossius had uttered the possibility of its inauthenticity. Carl Robert showed that the character of the 'Library' was totally alien from the spirit of Alexandrian scholarship. He The Greek Neplatonic philosopher and commentaror Simplicius, ca. 490-560 A.D., was one of the last great philosophers of pagan antiquity. He is best known for his useful commentaries on the Enchiridium of Epictetus and on Aristotle's Categoriae, Physica, De Caelo and De Anima. He had to flee Athens, to escape anti-pagan measures taken by the Roman emperor Justinian I, who closed the Platonist school, to the court of the Persian king Chosroes. His commentary on the Enchiridium is propaedeutic. The Enchiridium, in English Manual or Handbook, of the Greek Stoic philosopher Epictetus, ca. 50-130 A.D., is in fact a later summary, or epitome, of his collected lectures, also called diatribes, which had been published by his pupil Arrianus. Like the Stoics Epictetus wanted to make man free and independent of the vicissitudes of fortune. 'We must not, he said, let our happiness depend on things which are not in our power. The only thing which is always in one's power is one's own self and one's will. This we must keep unblemished. We must be indifferent to death, pain and illness, and even the loss of our dearest relatives must not touch us. For all this not only belongs to the external world, but also happens through Divine Providence, which is always good' (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 390) The practical exercises for a moral life of the pagan Epictetus found many Christian admirers, and he continued to be read in Byzantine times. The Renaissance brought Epictetus new readers. In 1479 a Latin translation by Polizziano of the Manual was published. The Manual was even adapted by a 16th century Jesuit, Matteo Ricci, for a Chinese public, for, he argued, Stoicism was close in spirit to Confucianism. The classical scholar and neostoic Justus Lipsius, 1547-1606, thought that the Stoicism of Epictetus could profitably be combined with Christianity. A host of editions and translations was published before the 19th century. After that interest in Epictetus declined, 'although Nietzsche acknowledged him as one of the great moralists of antiquity, whose quiet slave nobility compared favorably with Christian slave morality. More recently Epictetus has benefited from a renewed scholarly interest in Hellenistic philosophy'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 319/20) Although he is not mentioned on the title, it is clear from the short introduction, written by the Dutch classicist Daniel Heinsius, 1580-1655, that he edited the Greek text of Simplicius. He tells us that he used for this new edition the text which was published in Venice in 1528. He collated it with the help of another manuscript, according to the 'Typographus amico lectori' a codex called Nansianus. Oldfather ascribes this title simply to Daniel Heinsius and not to Salmasius. Heinsius 'began the work, collated new Manuscripts and carried it far towards completion'. (Oldfather 812) Schweighaeuser states simply, 'At in ipso libro (edition of Simplicius) curando nullae prorsus fuerant Salmasii partes'. (Schweighaeuser, Epicteti Manuale, Lpz., 1798, p. XLVI) describes the work as destined for use in school, and dates it to the first half of the 2nd century A.D. By critics of Robert it was objected that the schortcomings of the work were characteristic of the activity of an epitomator. Eduard Schwarz stated in an article in the RE (1894) that it was not a schoolbook, but that it was a manual aiming at the general instruction of an educated public. The Dutch scholar Marchinus van der Valk attemped in an article in REG 7 (1958), p. 100-168, a detailed investigation into the sources of the 'Library'. 'Among these sources he mainly focusses on the Argonautika of Apollonios of Rhodos, which Apollodorus would have consulted directly, Pherekydes (...) and Hellanikos (...). According to Van der Valk the explicit references to many sources point to a direct dependency, and their uniform character is an indication of the deliberate concept of one author rather than of a second-rate production depending exclusively on mythological manuals. Further, Van der Valk derives from the artificial decency forced upon several legendary treatments that the work was primarily destined for use at school, and dates it to the first century A.D. on the basis of the idiom'. (Source: M. Huys, '125 years of scholarship of Apollodorus the Mythographer', in 'L'Antiquité Classique', 66 (1997), 1997, p. 319-351) The worth of this unpretending manual lies in the preservation of older material, and it remains a valuable source for our knowledge on previous mythography and Hellenistic scholarship, and archaic poetry. Its usefulness for didactic purposes was already recognized in antiquity, and explains its popularity ever since the 'editio princeps' of 1555, published by the humanist Benedetto Egio of Spoleto, or in Latin Benedictus Aegius Spoletinus, who also added a Latin translation and some notes. All manuscripts of the 'Library' go back to one incomplete manuscript, which was copied for Cardinal Bessarion in the 15th century. Aegius boasts that he restored the mutilated text in its original splendor. But, 'alas by his hypercritical activity many 'Verschlimbesserungen' have intruded into the text'. (Huys p. 320) In 1599 Hieronymus Commelinus published the next edition. The third, this edition, was published by the French scholar Tanneguy Le Fèbvre, or in Latin Tanaquil Faber, 1615-1672, 'professeur de grec de l'Académie protestante de Saumur'. He presented a revised Greek text of his own, obviously without consulting manuscripts. His method was simply to read and reread the text of Aegius as careful as he could. His notes, he says, will show how and where he departed from Aegius' text. 'Graecum autem contextum legimus, relegimus, quanta maxima cura & diligentia fieri potuit, cuius rei fidem, spero, facient notulae nostrae'. Opposing the Greek text Faber printed the Latin translation of Aegius, 'locis infinitis' corrected. ( Bibliothêkê, 1661, p. 260) Faber suggested that the 'Library' was a 'Epitome' of a larger work of Apollonius Atheniensis, the 'Peri Theôn'. Faber was a diligent editor of Greek and Latin texts, but he is famous because of his daughter Anne, who later married to scholar André Dacier. This book was printed and published by the French publisher Jean de Lesnier, 1639-1675, printer for the protestant academy of Saumur. In 1664 De Lesnier married Anne Le Fèvre, 1647-1720, the daughter of the editor of this book Tanneguy Le Fèvre. After the publisher's early death in 1675, Anne, widowed at the age of 28, married in 1683 André Dacier, pupil of her father, and became a respected classical philologist herself under the name of 'Madame Dacier'. So in 1661, when Anne was 14 years old, De Lesnier printed this work of his future father in law. He married her when she was 17) (Collation: pi2, (pi2 should have been cancelled for the next leaf chi1), chi1; A-Z4. Aa-Nn4, Oo1 (not signed; verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152310 Euro 560,00
APOLLODORUS ATHENIENSIS. Apollodori Atheniensis Bibliothecae libri tres, et fragmenta. Curis secundis illustravit Chr.G. HEYNE. (Bound with:) Ad Apollodori Bibliothecam observationes auctore Chr.G. HEYNE. Göttingen, typis Henrici Dieterich, 1803. 8vo. 2 vols. in 1: LVI,468;400,(112 indices) p. Modern cloth. 21 cm (Hoffmann 1,199/200; some slight foxing) (Note: Heyne thoroughly revised and corrected his first edition and commentary, which was first published in 1782-1783. 'Heyne for the first time managed to purge the text from the many errors that had been brought in by Aegius, (...) But his most important contribution is certainly his copious and still useful exegetical commentary'. (M. Huys, '125 years of scholarship of Apollodorus the Mythographer', in 'L'Antiquité Classique', 66 (1997), 1997, p. 321) The 'Library', a late antique work on Greek mythology, is nowadays attributed to one 'Pseudo-Apollodorus'. In his dissertation of 1873 the German classical scholar Carl Robert proved that this work cannot be identified or derived from any work of the Alexandrian scholar Apollodorus Atheniensis, who was born ca. 180 B.C. in Athens. Already the Dutch 17th century classical scholar Isaac Vossius had uttered the possibility of its inauthenticity. Carl Robert showed that the character of the 'Library' was totally alien from the spirit of Alexandrian scholarship. He describes the work as destined for use in school, and dates it to the first half of the 2nd century A.D. By critics of Robert it was objected that the schortcomings of the work were characteristic of the activity of an epitomator. Eduard Schwarz stated in an article in the RE (1894) that it was not a schoolbook, but that it was a manual aiming at the general instruction of an educated public. The Dutch scholar Marchinus van der Valk attemped in an article in REG 7 (1958), p. 100-168, a detailed investigation into the sources of the 'Library'. 'Among these sources he mainly focusses on the Argonautika of Apollonios of Rhodos, which Apollodorus would have consulted directly, Pherekydes (...) and Hellanikos (...). According to Van der Valk the explicit references to many sources point to a direct dependency, and their uniform character is an indication of the deliberate concept of one author rather than of a second-rate production depending exclusively on mythological manuals. Further, Van der Valk derives from the artificial decency forced upon several legendary treatments that the work was primarily destined for use at school, and dates it to the first century A.D. on the basis of the idiom'. The worth of this unpretending manual lies in the preservation of older material, and it remains a valuable source for our knowledge on previous mythography and Hellenistic scholarship, and archaic poetry. Its usefulness for didactic purposes was already recognized in antiquity, and explains its popularity ever since the 'editio princeps' of 1555, published by the humanist Benedetto Egio of Spoleto, or in Latin Benedictus Aegius Spoletinus, who also added a Latin translation and some notes. All manuscripts of the 'Library' go back to one incomplete manuscript, which was copied for Cardinal Bessarion in the 15th century. Aegius boasts that he restored the mutilated text in its original splendor. But, 'alas by his hypercritical activity many 'Verschlimbesserungen' have intruded into the text'. (Source: M. Huys, '125 years of scholarship of Apollodorus the Mythographer', in 'L'Antiquité Classique', 66 (1997), 1997, p. 319-351)
Book number: 115758 Euro 100,00
ARNOBIUS. Arnobii Disputationum adversus gentes libri septem, recogniti & aucti. Ex bibliotheca Theodori Canteri Ultraiectini, cuius etiam notae adiectae sunt. Antwerpen (Antverpiae), Ex officina Christophori Plantini, 1582. 8vo. 285,(1 errata, & 2 blank) p. Tasteful modern half calf. 18 cm (Ref: Belg. Typ. 172; STC Dutch p. 14; Adams A1996; Voet 596 variant A; Sorgeloos 113; Dibdin 1,215: 'An excellent edition, in which the modesty and learning of its editor are successfully opposed to the rashness of his predecessor Gelenius' (in his edition of 1546); Ebert 1219; not in Brunet) (Details: Woodcut printer's device on the title. Red morocco letterpiece on the back. The binder used a broad strip of vellum as spine lining; this strip was probably cut from an old manuscript contract) (Condition: Name on the title. Very small tear near the right lower corner of the title. Occasional old ink underlinings on ca. 70 pages. Right margin of the last 60 pages slightly waterstained, the last gathering however more so) (Note: Arnobius, a teacher of rhetoric at Sicca Veneria in Numidia, 'was suddenly converted to Christianity (ca. A.D. 295) and a year or two later, at the instance of his bishop, he wrote seven books 'Adversus Nationes', 'Against the Pagans'. 'His work throws light on the Christian-pagan debate immediately before the Great Persecution, while the venom of his attack on traditional Roman paganism shows that this was by no means dead'. (OCD 2nd edition p. 122) His style is easy-flowing. Arnobius makes little use of the New, and none of the Old Testament. His view of God is platonic. The unintended side effect of the efforts of Arnobius and other Church Fathers to ridicule or crush paganism, was that their writings form an archive which preserves knowledge and practices of polytheism in the years of its decline in late antiquity. § Just as the early christians bolstered their piety by contrasting it with the demonic foulness of pagan religion, so the protestants of the 16th century used their knowledge of pagan idolatry to scourge their catholic adversaries. Critics of Catholicism, like Calvin, compared catholic mass e.g. with the bloody rituals of the pagans, and used the sacrifices of the ancients to score theological points against their opponents. 'Protestants detected in the Catholic cult of images, the pagan idols so well described by late antique critics like Arnobius'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 678, s.v. Paganism) The work of Arnobius was first published in Rome in 1542 (although the preface is dated 1543). Other editions followed in 1546, 1560 and 1580. Our edition of 1582 was produced by the Dutch scholar Theodorus Canterus (Dirk Canter), 1545-1617. He followed the edition of Gelenius of 1546, who sometimes rewrote the text 'ope ingenii' to make difficult passages intelligible. Canterus inserts some modifications of his own, and returns for readings to the 'editio princeps' of 1542, edited by Faustus Sabaeus. This was a wise policy and a sensible thing to do. Canter's textual and exegetical notes appear as endnotes. (See for Canter and his Arnobius edition 'History of Scholarship: A Selection of Papers from the Seminar on the History of Scholarship Held Annually at the Warburg Institute', edited by Christopher Ligota, Jean-Louis Quantin. Oxford University Press, 2006, page 97-100). § The history of classical philology saw strange creatures, and Dirk Canter sure was one. He was the brother of the great classical scholar Willem Canter, studied classics in Paris under Lambinus, but was the rest of his life primarily a political and religious adventurer in his hometown, the city of Utrecht. He was there mayor, political agitator, religious opportunist and extremist, a conspirator to overthrow the government of the city to seize power. He was banished in 1611. Still he managed to find time to produce this excellent scholarly edition and other philological work, such as 'Variarum lectionum libri duo', Antwerp 1574) (NNBW 1,558) (Provenance: the signature on the first and last page is probably of a member of the Soissy family, originating from the Champagne) (Collation: A-S8 (leaf S8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130068 Euro 750,00
ARNOBIUS.- MEURSIUS,J. Ioannis Meursii Criticus Arnobianus tributus in libros septem. Item Hypocriticus Minutianus, & Excerpta MS. Regii Parisiensis. Editio altera, & melior. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Ludovici Elzevirii, 1599. 8vo. (XX),167,(23)(1 blank) Vellum 16 cm (Ref: Dibdin 1,215: 'an indispensable work to peruse, for those who are curious in the learning of the author'; Willems 44; Rahir 26; Berghman 1283; Schoenemann 1,166/67) (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints; colophon at the end: 'Lugduni Batavorum, Excudebat Ioannes Balduini. Anno 1599, mense Julio') (Condition: Short title in ink on the back; vellum somewhat soiled; 2 hardly noticable pinpoint wormholes in the first 6 leaves; some foxing; name on front flyleaf erased, leaving a small hole) (Note: Arnobius, a teacher of rhetoric at Sicca Veneria in Numidia 'was suddenly converted to Christianity (ca. A.D. 295) and a year or 2 later, at the instance of his bishop, wrote seven books 'Adversus Nationes', Against the Pagans. His work throws light on the Christian-pagan debate immediately before the Great Persecution, while the venom of his attack on traditional Roman paganism shows that this was by no means dead'. (OCD 2nd edition p. 122) His style is easy-flowing. Arnobius makes little use of the New, and none of the Old Testament. His view of God is platonic. The unintended side effect of the efforts Arnobius and other Church Fathers to ridicule or crush paganism, was that their writings form an archive which preserves knowledge and practices of polytheism in the years of its decline in late antiquity. Just as the early christians bolstered their piety by contrasting it with the demonic foulness of pagan religion, so the protestants of the 16th century used their knowledge of pagan idolatry to scourge their catholic adversaries. Critics of Catholicism, like Calvin, compared catholic mass e.g. with the bloody rituals of the pagans, and used the sacrifices of the ancients to score theological points against their opponents. 'Protestants detected in the Catholic cult of images, the pagan idols so well described by late antique critics like Arnobius'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 678, s.v. Paganism) The work of Arnobius was first published in Rome in1542 (although the preface is dated 1543), containing as Book Eight the 'Octavius' of Minucius Felix. Other editions followed in 1546, 1560, 1580, 1582, 1583 & 1586. Joannes Meursius, or in Dutch 'Jan de Meurs', 1579-1639, was only 19 years old when he published the first edition of this celebrated 'Criticus Arnobianus' in Leyden in 1598. He studied under the genius J.J. Scaliger, who helped him to publish it. It was a work of philology and not of theology, and it enjoyed a mixed reception. Schoeneman observes that the book showed indeed the 'acumen' of the author's genius, but that it is more on others classical authors than on Arnobius and Minucius Felix. Meursius offers for the greater part animadversions, critical notes, conjectures and emendations. He did not consult manuscripts, but used his 'ingenium'. The next year, 1599, Elsevier published this second improved edition of the 'Criticus Arnobianus'. It was not 'augmented', as is usual with second editions, on the contrary, Meursius wisely cut a number of his rasher suggestions. In 1610 Meursius became professor of Greek at his own university. There, in Leyden, he produced the 'editiones principes' of a number of Byzantine authors, the 'editio princeps' of the 'Elementa Harmonica' of Aristoxenus (1616), and edited the 'Timaeus' of Plato with the commentary and translation of Chalcidius (1617). He wrote much on the antiquities of Athens and Attica. (J.E. Sandys, 'A history of classical scholarship', 1964, p. 311)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in pencil the name of 'J.A. Dijck') (Collation: +12 (minus leaf +11 & +12), A - M8 (leaf M8 verso blank)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 120114 Euro 600,00
ARTICULI DIAETALES. Articuli Diaetales Principatus Transsylvaniae. Hermannstadt (Cibinii), impressit Johannes Barth, (1744) 14 unnumbered leaves. No binding. 32 cm (Details: Woodcut headpiece at the beginning of the text: 2 putti supporting the coat of arms of Transsylvania, or in German Siebenbürgen. On the lower half of the shield, the 7 fortresses on hills are depicted. On the upper part a rising aegle is flanked by the sun and a waxing moon. (See the Wikipedia lemma 'Historical coat of arms of Transsylvania') Further woodcut initials, a six page list with the names and functions of 125 Transsylvanian nobles and dignitaries) (Condition: 7 loose gatherings held together with a thread. The edges are slightly thumbed and show some wear and tear. Slightly and partly waterstained; some foxing. The document was once folded crosswise. 2 small holes in the blank lower margins because of wear. The last 3 leaves are loose. 3 names on G2 verso, the last but one leaf, at the end of the text. This page shows in its center a big red stain, the remnants of a removed seal) (Note: Southeastern Europe was for centuries the battleground where the Catholic Habsburg empire and the Muslim Ottoman empire fought for supremacy. After the battle of Mohacs (1526), where the Hungarians were defeated by Suleyman I, Transsylvania, called in German 'Siebenbürgen', (the eastern part of modern Romania) became a vassal state of the Turcs. The 'Principatus Transylvaniae', the princedom of Transylvinia was ruled by native Hungarian princes, who had to pay tribute to the Ottomans, but could rule with considerable autonomy. The Austrians managed to conquer the region shortly after the famous battle of Vienna of 1683, where the Turcs were defeated. In 1687 the Hungarian nobility recognized the suzeranity of the Habsburg emperor Leopold I, and from 1711 the princedom was subjected to direct rule by Karl VI, who replaced the princes by the his own govenors. Maria Theresia, (1717- 1780) archduchess of Austria, queen of Hungary etc. succeeded her father in 1741. In 1745 she became by her marriage empress of the Holy Roman Empire. The principality of Transsylvania was reincorporated into the Hungarian Kingdom in 1867, and the 'Diet', its 'parliament' was dissolved. After the defeat in World War I, the Austrian-Hungarian empire desintegrated, and the Kingdom of Romania was proclaimed. The Comitia of the Habsburg 'Magnus Principatus Transylvaniae', also called the 'Diaeta', the 'Diet' or in German, the 'Landstag', are the convention of the three 'nations' of the country. This 'Unio Trium Nationum' consisted of the catholic Hungarian nobility, the Saxons (Universitas Saxonum, or Natio Saxonica, sive Saxonum), who were of German origin and protestants, and who spoke German, and the 'natio Siculica, sive Siculicorum', the Szekler, which was a Hungarian speaking minority, and who enjoyed ever since the Middle Ages special privileges. The Romanian people, about 50 % of the population, had no rights or representatives at all. The Comitia were held a few times a year from 1719 onward in Claudiopolis (Romanian Cluj, German Klausenburg), where the Gubernium, the viceregent of the empress Maria Theresia had his seat, and from 1732 in Hermanstadt (Rumanian Sibiu, from the Latin name of this city Cibinium). The viceregent (Gubernator Regius) presided the Comitia. An account of the discussions in the Comitia, the 'Acta Diaetalia', was drawn up in triplicate, a copy for the archive (Veteri Gubernii Archivo Cibinii) of the 'Gubernius Regius' in Hermannstadt, one for the 'Commissarius Regius', and one for the empress herself. The decisions and the statements in the 'Articuli Diaetales' , the 'decreta Comitiorum' had to be signed by the Viceregent and a 'protonotarius' and to be submitted to the Empress, who confirmed them with her own signature. The document had to be signed also by the 'Cancellarius', who attached the Emperial Seal, the 'Sigillus Aulicus' to the document. Not till then had the 'Articuli Diaetales' force of law. ('pro fundamentali ac in perpetuum valitura Lege habentur'. J. Benkö, 'Diaetae, sive rectius Comitia Transsilvanica, eorumque decreta, quae vulgo adpellantur Articuli Diaetales', Hermanstadt, Cluj (Cibinii & Claudiopolis) 1791, p. 98) In 1744 Maria Theresia, only 27 years old, signed the 'Articuli diaetales' of the Transsylvanian princedom, which was a kind of constitution. The document consists of an introduction, several prefaces and 9 articles. In article III are repeated the names of the 125 Transsylvanian nobles, dignitaries and representatives from the 3 nations who signed in 1721 a previous 'Articulus Diaetalis' under Charles VI, thus declaring their loyalty to the Austrian throne. Article IV contains the text of the renewed oath of allegiance to the new empress, Maria Theresia, an oath wich was confirmed by the complete 'Comitia Transsylvaniae'. Article VII refers to the freedom of religion. In the 'conclusio' at the end Maria Theresia accepts, confirms and signs the 'articuli diaetales' benevolently and gladly in her palace in Vienna on the 7th of August 1744. This document bears on the last page the signature of the empress Maria Theresia. It was also signed by the Court Chancelor of Transsylvania 'Comes Ladislaus Gyulaffi, Liber Baro de Rátót'. Ladislaus (Laszlo) Gyulaffi was of old Hungarian nobility, and acting Chancellor from 1740 till 1754. The third signature belongs to a court notary , 'Josephus Kozma de K(ézdi)szentélek') (Collation: A - G2, added at the end is a blank unsigned leaf)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 151848 Euro 275,00
ATHANASIUS & BASILIUS. Athanasiou dialogoi e', peri tês hagias Triados. Basileiou logoi d' kata dussebous Eunomiou. Anastasiou kai Kurillou ekthesis suntomos tês orthodoksou pisteôs. Athanasii dialogi V, de sancta Trinitate. Basilii libri IIII, adversus impium Eunomium. Anastasii et Cyrilli compendiaria orthodoxae fidei explanatio. Ex interpretatione Th. Bezae. Foebadi, sive Foebadii liber contra Arianos. Quae Athanasii, Anastasii & Cyrilli sunt, & quae Foebadii, nunc primum eduntur. N.pl. (Geneva), Excudebat Henricus Stephanus, 1570. 8vo. (XIV),24;431,(1 blank) p. 18th century vellum 17.5 cm A collection of Trinitarian texts (Ref: GLN-2395; Hoffmann 1,387; Renouard, Estienne p. 133; Graesse 1,243; Butterweck, Athanasius Bibliographie, p. 64/65; Dibdin 1,196: 'scarce and estimable'; not in Brunet) (Details: Two morocco letterpieces on the spine. Boards with gilt borders. Marbled endpapers, edges dyed red. Nice copy) (Condition: The opusculum Liber contra Arianos of Foebadius is not bound at the end, as in the GLN copy, but immediately after the praefatio. The 3 pages with the castigationes (gathering c2, see collation) on Foebadius of P. Pithou and himself, which Beza added to Foebadius' Liber contra Arianos, are lacking) (Note: The Church Father Athanasius, 295-373 AD, is the most famous of the Alexandrian bishops, and is best known as the adversary of the antitrinitarian priest Arius. Because of his struggle with the Arians, the followers of Arius, Athanasius was banished for 17 years. In his works he fiercely defended the dogmata of the church against heretics like Arius. The controversy between Athanasius and Arius divided the Church into two opposing theological factions for over 55 years, from the time before the Council of Nicaea (325) till the Council of Constantinople (381). Athanansius was the champion of the Nicaeneans, defending the full divinity of the Son of God, Jesus Christ. Bardenhewer states that Athanasius is 'eine der gewaltigsten Erscheinungen der Kirchengeschichte. Nie mehr ist eine kirchliche Entscheidung getroffen worden von der Tragweite des homoousios des Nicänums, und nie mehr hat eine kirchliche Entscheidung einen Kampf heraufbeschworen wie denjenigen zwischen Nicänern und Antinicänern'. (Bardenhewer, 'Geschichte der altkirchlichen Literatur ', vol. 3, p. 44) § That he published in 1570 some editiones principes of a number of treatises on the Holy Trintiy, Theodorus Beza, 1519-1605, a Calvinist theologian who was professor of Greek at Geneva, couldnot care less. This 1570 edition, formed part of his polemical activity directed against the Antitrinitarianist heresy which was 'devastating' Poland and Transylvania during the sixties and seventies of the 16th century. This 'heresy', in existence within Christianity from the second century A.D. till the present day, rejects the mainstream Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity, i.e. 'that God is three distinct hypostases or persons who are coeternal, coequal, and indivisibly united in one being or ousia'. (Wikipedia: Nontrinitarism) The First Council of Nicaea (325) declared the full divinity of the Son of God, and the First Council of Constantinople (381), declared the divinity of the Holy Spirit. There were however christians who didnot accept this doctrine, argueing that the Trinity was inconsistent with the unity of God, and found no basis in the Scripture. In time the antitrinitarian view lost appeal in late antiquity and the trinitarian view became the orthodox doctrine of modern Christianity. During the Reformation of the 16th century large areas of Northern and Middle Europe rejected the Catholic creed and became Protestant. The protestant church chose to defend, like the church of Rome, the mystery of the Trinity as one of the essentials of the Christian creed. However within protestantism radical antitrinitarianism began to surface again. The best-known antitrinitarianist, the Spaniard Servetus, was burned at the stake in 1553 in Geneva, to signal unambiguously that the Reformed Church remained orthodox on the doctrine of the Trinity. The organised form of the antitrinitarianist heresy gained solid ground only in Poland, where Unitarians, who rejected the divine Trinity, split from the Calvinists in 1565 (they were expelled later from Poland in 1658), and in Transylvania in the Unitarian Church (1568). Another protestant antitrinitarian radical, the Italian Giorgio Biandrata proved instrumental in the rise of anti-Trinitarianism in both Transylvania and Poland, where this heresy took root in the 1560s and 1570s. Biandrata had to flee in 1558 from Geneva, and was received warmly by the Polish Congregation. Biandrata radically reinterpreted the 'homoousious', the term which had been crucial to Athanasius in his 4th century defence of the unity of the divine essence. Trinitas and essentia were according to Biandrata papistica vocabula. In 1562 a synod of the Polish Reformed Church accepted the antitrinitarian approach. One of the remaining Polish Trinitarian ministers, Christophorus Thretius, asked Beza for assistance in refuting antitrinitarianism 'adversus periditissimos illos (...) Ecclesiarum vastatores', among whom 'Blandratam'. (Preface, p. ¶2 verso) To help him and to furnish ammunition in order to suppress this Polish heresy Beza published this Athanasius edition. Beza tells in the preface, addressed to the worldly and ecclesiastial powers, catholics and protestants, in the kingdom of Poland, that his Athanasius edition is his gift (munusculum) to his Polish brothers in faith, which would be useful in their battle against their common enemy. (p. ¶7 recto/verso) The gift provided extensive scriptural testimony, for 'tanti est momenti ex fontibus ipsis veritatem haurire'. (p. ¶4 recto) 'It is that imporatant to go to the source if one wants to draw the truth'. Beza tells in the preface also that the manuscript of the Athanasius was bought by Henri Estienne from a Greek visitor (a Graeculo quodam hac transeunte redemptum), and that it was divine providence that it came into his hand (divinitus potius quam casu). (p. ¶3 verso) The manuscripts of the other works in this 1570 edition were found in the library of Germain Colladon by P. Pithou. The dialogues are now considered to be Pseudo-Athanasian. A discussion about this 1570 edition in I.D. Backus' 'Historical Method and Confessional Identity in the Era of the Reformation, 1378-1615', Leiden/Boston 2003, p. 173/78) § When Calvin died in 1564 Beza became his successor, not only as leader in religious and political affairs in Geneva, but also as guide the Calvinists in all Europe. Beza is best known for his Latin translation of the New Testament, his critical Greek edition of the New Testament, and for being the founder of the University of Geneva)(Collation: ¶8 (minus blank leaf ¶8) a8 b4, A-2C8 2D-2E4)) (Lacking after a8/b4, gathering c2, which contains Beza's castigationes on the text of Foebadius) (The GLN-2395 lacks also the blank leaf ¶8. The first gathering is nevertheless described there erroneously as ¶8, having (XVI) pages))(Photographs on request)
Book number: 120334 Euro 1300,00
ATHENAGORAS. Sancti Athenagorae Atheniensis Philosophi Legatio pro Christianis, ad Imperatores M. Aurelium Antoninum, & L. Aurelium Commodum. Ejusdem de Resurrectione mortuorum. Accedunt Latina versio, emendationes, variantes lectiones, annotationes, atque indices necessarii. Cura & studio Eduardi Dechair, A.M. Oxford (Oxoniae), E Theatro Sheldoniano, 1706. 4to. (XVI),219,(1 blank); 127,(1 blank),(8 index) p. Vellum. 20.5 cm (Ref: Neue Pauly, Supplement 2 p. 86; Dibdin 1,186: 'a very elaborate edition of Athenagoras (that) does great honour to the learning and industry of the editor'. Hoffmann 1,400; Brunet 1,537; Ebert 1321; Graesse 1,245) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints. 2 titles, the first completely in Greek type, the second in Latin. On the first title an engraving of the Sheldonian theatre. Printed in 2 columns, Greek with opposing Latin translation. The second part of the book consists of the 'Suffidi Petri annotationes in Athenagorae Legationem', and 'Langi annotationes', and the notes of Koltholtius et alii) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. 2 small ownership entries on the front flyleaf) (Note: Athenagoras of Athens, a converted pagan philosopher, was a Christian apologist who addressed between 176 and 180 AD an apology, called 'presbeia' (legatio) to the emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (died 180) and Commodus (appointed 176), in which he refuted traditional charges against the Christians, of atheism, canibalism, and incest. Athenagoras is considered to be the most eloquent of the Greek apologists. His Legatio is in the form of a speech composed according to the rules of Greek rhetoric. Through his wide reading in pagan literature he had a good grip of Greek philosophy and religion. He used technical philosophic terms that were current among educated pagans. His style is elegant, 'free from superfluous expressions, forcible and at times rising to great heights of descriptive power. His arrangements of material is always clear and his argument moves forward quietly and majestically. Even when apparent irrelevant mythological references are introduced they are made to serve Athenagoras' purpose of holding the hearers'and readers' attention and providing interesting information'. (L.W. Barnard, 'Athenagoras: A Study in Second Century Christian Apologetic', Paris, 1972, p. 32) 'The second treatise of Athenagoras 'On the resurrection of the dead' concerns an idea that was revolting and impossible in the eyes of pagans, who believed that the body after its dissolution couldnot be restored to its former state. Athenagoras was edited by the English scholar Edward Dechair, Magister Artium and Canon of St. Paul in London. He adopted the Greek text of Henricus Stephanus (1557), 'qui omnium accuratissimus nobis videbatur'. (Lectori, p. a4 verso) Dechair collated for this edition also 2 Bodleian manuscripts. Dechair added to this Greek text the corrected Latin translations of Gesner (Legatio), and Petrus Nannius ((de Ressurectione) which had previously been published in 1565 and in 1541. (Lectori p. b1 recto) For the notes he excerpted, he says, earlier work of Suffridus, Langus, Kortholt and Rechenberg. In his notes he incorporated also material of a scholiast, found in a Parisian manuscript, and for various readings in an Etonian manuscript he was indebted to the English scholar (William Worth, 1677-1742) (Provenance: A first ownership entry dated 1825, the second reads: 'Oxford 2-3-1963, J.S.S') (Collation: a-b4; A-Z4, Aa-Dd4, Ee2 (leaf Ee2 verso blank), *A-*R4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152317 Euro 290,00
AUGUSTINUS VENETUS. Inlustrium viror(um) ut exstant in Urbe expressi vultus caelo Augustini Veneti. Romae 1569. Cum Privilegio Sum. Pont. Padua, (Patavii), Prostant apud Mattheaeum Bolzettam de Cadorinis, 1648. Folio. 3 preliminary leaves, 1 plate with a folding double-page armorial engraving, 50 (of 52) full page engraved portraits. Green half morocco (18th century). 29 cm (Ref: Brunet 3,766) (Details: Back gilt with floral ornaments; marbled endpapers. Page 1 is an engraved architectural title page, with statues on both sides of the title. On top of a monument lie Hercules and a philosopher, supporting the globe which hovers between them; page 2 is an engraved portrait of Ioannes Cottunius, knight of St. George, and 'primus philosophus' at the University of Padua. To him this book has been dedicated; this portrait was engraved by G. Georgi. On page 3 the engraved Latin text of that dedication; the folding plate which follows then has in its center the coat of arms of Cottunius, flanked by Justitia holding a scale & sword, and Athena wearing a helmet & holding the barrel of a gun. Two putti float above the coat of arms. Each following plate shows engraved portraits, busts or hermai of a more or less famous figure of classical antiquity, starting with Thales. These portraits, busts and hermai which were on display in the houses and gardens of the powerful at Rome. 17 of them have the name of the illustrious person inscribed on them, e.g. Herodotus, Thucydides, the rest is anonymous. Near the lower margin of each plate has been engraved the present location of the statue depicted) (Condition: Cover scuffed; the leather at the head & tail of the back is damaged; 2 centimeters at the head of the back has gone. A few small wormholes in the endpapers only; a nameless bookplate has been pasted on the inside of the frontcover; small inscription on the front flyleaf; borders of the title slightly soiled; an inscription at the bottom of the title: 'ex dono Antonii Sardi 1719'; a small and faint stain in upper margin of the first 3 leaves; without the plates 18 & 19; lacking the half title) (Note: The eminent engraver Agostino de Musis, also called Agostino Veneziano, or Augustinus Venetus, after his place of birth, ca. 1490, Venice, was a pupil of the famous engraver Marc Antonio Raimondi, of whose fine style he was one of the most succesful followers. His earliest dated print was made in 1509, and as none of his works bear a later date than 1536, it may be presumed that he did not long survive that date. Agostino de Musis claims a distinguished rank among the engravers of his time. His prints are extremely scarce. He made portraits, biblical scenes, and also treated historical and mythological subjects. (Michael Bryan, Biographical and critical Dictionary of painters and engravers, London, 1816, vol. 2, p. 111/12) In the beginning of the book we find a dedication to the Greek scholar Ioannes Cottunius (In Greek Ioannis Kottounios, 1577 - 1658), by the Paduan printer Matthaeus Bolzetta, who explains that Augustinus Venetus has engraved the plates. The copper plates were once the property of Petrus Stephanonius Vicetinus. (Pietro Stefanoni of Vicenza, an engraver/publisher and a collector of antiquities, born 1589) Bolzetta goes on to tell, that he has bought the copper plates from the son of Pietro Stefanoni (Giacomo Stefanoni, himself also an editor of antiquities, floruit 1646). Bolzetta trusts that people will enjoy the engraved portraits of the busts which were on display in the gardens and houses of Rome. The copper plates were used earlier for an edition published in 1569, a year of publication which Bolzetta mentions on his own title of 1648. The collection of 1569 was made by the Portugese scholar Aquiles Estaco (Achilles Statius, 1524-1581), and published in Rome in 1569 by the French engraver/publisher Antonio Lafreri (1512-1577), who achieved a lot of success publishing collections of prints which reproduce antiquities. Bolzetta followed in his footsteps. He used for his edition the same copper plates as those used for the edition of 1569. The name of Lafreri, which is on the title of the 1569 edition, however, has been erased from the inpressum of our edition and replaced by that of Bolzetta himself. Bolzetta added below the title the name of whom he thought was the engraver, Augustinus Venetus.('caelo Augustini Veneti', which means 'by the burin of Agostino Veneziano'). Why Bolzetta did so, he explained in the dedication. There are however doubts. Mortimer says that these engravings are incorrectly attributed to Agostino Veneziano, because the engravings are much later than any of Agostino's dated work. (Ruth Mortimer, 'Italian 16th century books', Harvard 1974, p. 173) Our edition seems to be even more rare than the edition of 1569. KVK mentions 5 copies. In Americana Exchange we found only one copy auctioned, in 1985. Not one in Jahrbuch der Auktionspreise since 1960) (Provenance: On the extra blank front flyleaf has been written: '24 XII 1942, Liselotte, Baby'. On the lower blank margin of the title: 'Ex dono Antonij Sardi, 1719') (Photographs on request)
Book number: 103227 Euro 490,00
AUGUSTINUS. D. Aurelii Augustini Hipp. Episc. libri XIII Confessionum. Ad 3 MSS. Exempl. emendati. Opera et studio H. Sommalii, e Societate Jesu. (Bound with:) Divi Aurelii Augustini Hippon. Episcopi Meditationes, Soliloquia et Manuale. Meditationes B. Anselmi cum tractatu De humani generis redemptione. D. Bernardi, Idiotae viri docti, De amore divino. Omnia ad mss. exemplaria emend. & in meliorem ordin. distributa, opera ac studio R.P. Henrici Sommalii, Societatis Iesu Theologi. Ad 1: Cologne (Coloniae Agrippinae), Apud Balthasarem ab Egmont et Soc., 1683. Ad 2: Cologne, Sumptibus Cornelii ab Egmondt et Sociorum, 1702. 12mo. 2 volumes in 1: 427,(26 index),(3 blank); 410,(22) p. Vellum 12 cm (Ref: Cf. Schoenemann 2,342,& 2,346; Bardenhewer 4,452. STCN suggests that both works were printed in Amsterdam by the publishing house of Blaeu) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Short title in ink on the back. Engraved titles, the first one depicts a standing Augustine, on a cloud above him God and dove, the Holy Ghost. On the second title a preaching bishop Augustine, with at his feet a winged putto carrying a burning heart pierced by an arrow, which refers to Confessiones IX,2 where it is said of God: Sagittaveras tu nostrum cor caritate tua, or You had pierced our hearts with the arrows of your love) (Condition: Vellum age-toned. One very minute hole in the back. Paper slightly yellowing) (Note: Aurelius Augustinus, 354-430 AD, bishop of Hippo, is undoubtedly the greatest and the most influential of the Church Fathers. He was trained in classical rhetoric and ancient philosophy, and 'left his distinctive mark on most aspects of western Christianity. (...) Augustine's major works are landmarks in the abandonment of classical ideals'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 148). 'Es war um 400, als Augustinus daran ging, die Geschichte seines geistigen und sittlichen Werdens von frühester Kindheid an bis zum Empfang der Taufe oder bis zum Tode der Mutter zur Darstellung zu bringen'. (Bardenhewer, 4,451). He did so in his 13 books of Confessiones, an autobiography more or less in the form of a prayer. According to Bardenhewer, who calls this work 'ein Kunstwerk von unvergleichlichem Reize', would Laudations (to God), be a more precise translation of this title, than Confessions. The editio princeps appeared in 1470. The number of later editions is countless. Bardenhewer mentions this edition of the Belgian Jesuit Henricus Sommalius, or Henri de Sommal (1534-1619), first after the editio princeps of 1470. It was first published in 1607. (Bardenhewer, 4,452) Worldcat numbers between 1607 and 1767 44 editions of this work of Sommalius. His edition of 1600 of the medieval theologian Thomas a Kempis is his best known and lasting contribution. He even has a short lemma in Wikipedia. § The second volume in this binding consists of a collection of 3 Pseudo-Augustine medieval devotional texts, the Meditationes, Manuale and the Soliloquia. They have long been ascribed to Church Father Augustine. Sommalius and his contemporaries were convinced that these 3 works were genuine. The material and the style show similarities to his Confessiones, and that is why this collection crept into the Opera Omnia of Augustine. These 3 tracts are the work of the German benedictine monk Eckbertus Schonaugiensis Abbas (Abt Ekbert von Schönau, 1120-1184). The collection was very popular in the Late Middle Ages because there existed a wish to return to the roots of early Christianity. (lib.ugent.be/fulltxt/RUG01/001/309/891/RUG01-001309891_2010_0001_AC.pdf) (See on these spuria, works of Pseudoaugustine, also Bardenhewer 4,452 and Schoenemann 2,342) (Collation: A-2E8, 2F4 (leaf 2F3 verso blank, leaf 2F4 blank); A-2D8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120512 Euro 300,00
AUGUSTINUS. De Belydenisse van S Augustyn. (Nu onlanghs uyt het Latijn in het Duytsch overgeset door eenen Eerweerdigen P. der Societeyt Jesu) Antwerpen, ('t Antwerpen), By Frederick van Metelen, inde Warmoes-straet inde 4 Evangelisten, 1688. 12mo. (XV)(1 blank),365 (recte 363),(1),(4 blank) p. Calf 15 cm (Ref: cf. OiN 106) (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands. Gilt floral motives in the 4 compartments of the back. Engraved title, depicting Augustine leaning against a tree, in the sky 3 angels, one of them calling tolle lege, tolle lege. Printed in Gothic script) (Condition: Back rubbed; foot of spine slightly damaged; a few small wormholes visible in the frontcover; 5 pinpoint wormholes in first gathering, reduced in the second gathering to 3, and in the fouth to 2 wormholes, of which one is in the inner margin/gutter, sometimes nibbling at a letter. Front flyleaf removed. 3 names on the front pastedown) (Note: Aurelius Augustinus, bishop of Hippo, 354-430 A.D., was one of the most outstanding men in the whole history of Christianity and of literature. 'Of the most significant events of this great man's life we have the best possible testimony, his own, set forth in the very remarkable autobiography generally styled the Confessiones. (H.J. Rose, A handbook of Latin literature, London, 1967, p. 496) The Confessiones, comprising 13 books, was written ca. 400. In his youth Augustinus led a wicked and irregular life. 'In 386 came what is usually regarded (it was certainly so regarded by him) as his conversion. A child's voice bade him take up and read (tolle, lege), and opening a copy of the Pauline epistles at random, he hit upon what he regarded as an authorative and Divine message, Romans 13, 13-14'. (H.J. Rose, p. 497/98) His activity as a writer was enormous. § This Dutch translation of 1688 of the books 1-X of the Confessiones, the oldest autobiography of world literature, was first published in 1603. It was translated by Johannes Semmius. In 1604 followed a revised edition, printed in Antwerp on the presses of Nutius. An anonymous Jesuit priest compared the translation with a Latin edition and made many corrections. (door een Eerw. Priester der Societyt Jesu met het Latijn geconfereert ende tot veel plaetsen verbetert) In the short preface of the 1688 edition the publisher now states that the Belydenisse were translated by a Jesuit priest. (Voor-reden, p. A2 recto: door eenen Eerweerdigen P. er Societeyt Jesu) and that his translation is a corrected version of an edition which was previously printed by Hendrick Aertssens. This edition of Aertssens, the publisher goes on, was printed in small type, and now he offers a edition in big type, which is easier to read for the old. (Idem: gedruckt by Hendrick Aertssens met kleyn letter / ende als nu gerieffelijcker voor den ouderdom met grooter letter herdruckt ende gecorrigeert zijnde; niet twijffelende oft het sal U.L. aengenaem wesen) Hendrick Aertssens had published a translation of the Confessiones in 1636, in Antwerp. This edition of 1688 even repeats the approbatie of 1636. (Idem: Dese thien Boecken der Belijdenisse van S. Augustinus, uyt het Latijn in 't Duytsch overgeset, sullen profijteljck mogen gedruckt worden. Actum Antverpiae den 17 September, 1636) (Provenance: In ink on the front pastedown 'M.J. Baesten', or 'M.I. Baesten'. Then an illegible name, also an erased name. § Near the lower margin 'Norbardina De Greeff') (Collation: A-Q12 (leaf A8 verso and Q11 & Q12 blank) The page numering between the gatherings L and M is irregular, two page numbers have been skipped there; nothing is missing) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120536 Euro 125,00
AUGUSTINUS. (PSEUDO-AUGUSTINUS). S. Augustinus, Vierige Meditatien ofte Aendachten, ende de Alleen-spraeken der Zielen tot Godt. Ende oock dat Handt-boecxken van der aen-schouvvinge Christi. Item noch S. Bernardus, Devote Aendachten. Ende een boecxken van S. Anselmus, ghenaemt de Straele der Goddelijcker Liefden, met sommighe van sijne Ghebeden. Van nieuws verbetert na't latijnsch exemplaer. Gent, (te Gendt), By François d'Ercle, 1672. 12mo. 5 parts in 1: 179;162;78;82;58,(11 index),(1 blank) p. Overlapping vellum 13 cm (Ref: Bibliotheca Catholica Neerlandica Impressa 1500-1727, nr. 12887) (Details: 2 laces through the joints, at head & tail of spine. 5 titles with 5 different woodcut devices. The first is a scene from a well known medieval legend about Augustine, it shows an angel/child busy emptying the sea with a shell, and Saint Augustine leaning on his rod) (Condition: Vellum soiled and slightly spotted; paper of both pastedowns with cracks; first title somewhat thumbed; old inscription at the end of the last p.) (Note: Ad 1; This Pseudo-Augustine collection of 3 medieval devotional texts, the 'Meditationes', 'Manuale' and the 'Sololoquia', has long been ascribed to the churchfather Augustinus, A.D. 354-430. The material and the style show similarities to his Confessiones, and that is why this collection crept into the Opera Omnia of Augustine. These 3 tracts are the work of the German benedictine monk Eckbertus Schonaugiensis Abbas (Abt Ekbert von Schönau, 1120-1184). The collection was very popular in the Late Middle Ages because there existed a wish to return to the roots of early Christianity. After the introduction of the printing press these texts remained popular. The first translation of the 'Vierige Meditatien' was published in 1500. Until 1700 the Dutch translation of these 3 Pseudo-Augustine tracts was reissued 21 times, often in Antwerp, in the Southern catholic part of the Low Countries. Early in the 16th century some works of Bernardus Clarivallensis and of Saint Anselmus were added to the collection. This might be the work of the Dutch translator Antonius van Hemert, a cleric who was born at the beginning of that century. He was a Canon Regular at Marienhage near Eindhoven, and wrote devotional texts himself. His translation of the 3 Pseudo-Augustine titles, accompanied by the 'Devote Meditatien' of Bernardus and the 'De straele der goddelijcker liefden' of Anselmus appeared in 1543 for the first time. Later editors and translators kept these texts together. One of these new editors was Daniel Bredan, a notary from Amsterdam, who published a new version in the beginning of the 17th century. (On Van Hemert, Van der Aa, 8,1 p. 520/21; on the 'Vierige Meditatien' see T. Impens, 'Van nieus overgheset. De overlevering van de laatmiddeleeuwse devotionele literatuur in de volkstaal (1473-1700)', Gent 2006/7, p. 133 ff. (lib.ugent.be/fulltxt/RUG01/001/309/891/RUG01-001309891_2010_0001_AC.pdf ) (Provenance: Old ink inscription, probably beginning 18th century, on the last page, reading: 'desen boeck beoort toe aen het couvendt van de swarte susters tot Iper. In bewaerijnghe van s. Augusstine (sic) Vallaeis'. The congregation of the Augustine order of the Black Sisters is an order of beguines which was founded in the 14th century in the Southern Low Countries. A regional hospital in Ypres called the 'Kliniek Zwarte Zusters' still exists today. We have not yet traced Black Sister 'Augustine Vallaeis', or 'Vallaeys'.) (Collation: a - z12, 2a10)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 120490 Euro 360,00
AURELIUS VICTOR, SEXTUS. Sexti Aurelii Victoris Historia Romana, cum notis integris Dominici Machanei, Eliae Vineti, Andreae Schotti, Jani Gruteri, nec non excerptis Frid. Sylburgii & Annae Fabri filiae, curante Joanne Arntzenio. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Apud Janssonio-Waesbergios, Utrecht (Trajecti Batav.), Apud Jacobum à Poolsum, 1733. 4to. Frontispiece, XLVI,668,134 p., 1 engraved plate, numerous engraved coins in the text. Mottled calf 24.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,1136: 'Neue Recension. Dem Text liegt Schott's Ausg. zum Grunde; des Herausgebers eigene Bemerkungen sind von Werth'; Brunet 5,1178: 'édition la plus estimée'; Dibdin 1,343: ''an elaborate performance', 'the edition is indispensable to the collector's library'. Spoelder p. 617: Kampen 1) (Details: Prize copy, including the prize; back gilt with lozenge-shaped motif; covers with gilt borders, floral cornerpieces, and the coat of arms of the Dutch city Kampen in the center of both covers; marbled endpapers; frontispiece: Roman soldiers around a statue of Roma. Title in red and black. Engraved printer's device of Jansonius-Waesbergius on the title, depicting a mole, flanked by Athena and Hermes; the motto reads: 'Vulgo caeca vocor, video sed acutius ipso') (Condition: Cover scuffed and worn at the extremes; head of spine very slightly damaged; the letterpiece on the back has probably gone) (Note: Sextus Aurelius Victor, ca. 320-ca. 390 A.D., historian of the Roman Empire. He published his work ca. 361 A.D., the year of the death of the emperor Julian Apostata, who admired Victor, and appointed him to praefectus of Pannonia Secunda. In late antiquity his work was combined by an unknown redactor with 2 other histories to make a continuous history, the socalled 'Historia Romana', from Augustus to 360. This combined work passed down through the ages under the name of Sextus Aurelius Victor. His approach is biographic, and his stylistic example is the Roman historian Sallustius. His contemporary Ammianus Marcellinus praises his sobre mindedness, his 'sobrietas'. The Dutch classical scholar Jan, or Johannes Arntzenius was born in 1702 and died in 1759 in Franeker, where he was professor of Eloquentia and Historia since 1743. In 1726 he produced a dissertation 'De nuptiis inter fratrem et sororem'. He also edited the Panegyricus of Pliny (Amst. 1738), the Disticha Catonis (Utrecht 1735), Pacatus Drepanius (Amst. 1753), and Sedulius (Leeuwarden 1761). (Van der Aa 1,393/4) (Provenance: the manuscript prize reads: 'Egregie adolescente, Johanni ab Utrecht Dresselhuis, cum e secunda classe in primam transiret hoc praemium D.D. Scholarum Campensium Curatores, examine aestivo 1804. Rector Henr. Weijtingh'; small stamp on the prize of 'Marnix Gymnasium Rotterdam'. This pupil: Johannes ab Utrecht Dresselhuis (1789-1861) became a wellknown and beloved clergyman in the Dutch province of Zealand. His publications on the history of Zealand were very popular at the time. In Wolphaartsdijk, near Goes, a monument was erected in his honour, one year after his death. It was made by a sculptor from Antwerp, J.J. Rousseaux. It is still present, photos can be found online at: 'Mens & Dier in Steen & Brons' by René en Peter van der Krogt)(Collation: *-6*4; A-4R4 (minus leaf 4R4), 4S-5H4, 5I2)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 140101 Euro 325,00
BADEN, TORCHILLUS. Torchilli Badenii Jac. fil. Roma Danica, harmoniam atque affinitatem linguae danicae cum lingua romana exhibens. Editio altera priore anni 1699 auctior et emendatior curante Torchillo Badenio pronepote. Copenhagen (Hafniae), Apud C. Steenium, 1835. 8vo. (IV),206 p. Contemporary blue boards 19,5 cm (Small Danish name in ballpoint on titlepage) (Note: Torkel Baden, or Torkil Baden, 1765-1849, 'studied at Göttingen and acquired an interest in art during his travels in Italy. He was professor at Kiel in Holstein (then part of Denmark) and (in 1804-23) at Copenhagen. His published works (such as his dissertation on Philostratus) were partly inspired by his interest in ancient art. He 'had read nearly all the Greek and Latin Classics', but the result of all this reading is inadequately represented in his edition of the Tragedies of Seneca. His edition of his grandfather's 'Roma Danica' brought him into feud with other scholars. He was more fortunate in his new and improved edition of his father's dictionaries (1815-31)'. (Sandys, 'A history of classical scholarship', 3,316) Torkel Baden has a lemma in Wikipedia. In the German version he is called 'ein Vorreiter der Archäologie in Dänemark'. His grandfather Torkel Baden, 1668-1732, who wrote the first edition of this 'treatise on the affinity of the Danish and Latin languages', and which was published in Copenhagen in 1699, has also a lemma in Wikipedia, unfortunately only in Danish. It copies an article from 'Dansk Biografisk Leksikon')
Book number: 130021 Euro 90,00
BARTHOLIN,Th. Th. Bartholini Filii de Holgero Dano, qui Caroli Magni tempore floruit, Dissertatio historica. Copenhagen (Hafniae), Sumtibus Petri Hauboldi, Literis Matthiae Godicchenii, 1677. 8vo. (XXIV,189,(19) p. 19th century boards. 16 cm (Ref: Bibliotheca Danica III, p. 36; Brunet 6 no. 27600; ) (Details: Title in red & black. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, the motto reads: In conatu labor) (Condition: The rear joint is starting to split near the foot of the spine. A pinpoint wormhole in the right lower corner of the last half, keeping far from the text. Paper yellowing. Some foxing) (Note: The story of Ogier le Danois, or Ogier de Danemarche, or Holger the Dane, (in Danish Holger Danske) has been industriously investigated by the Danish historian Thomas Bartholin, 1659-1690, who published mainly on Scandinavian and Danish antiquities and nobility. He wrote also a dissertation on the Longobards. Holger or Ogier was a conspicuous character in romance, who first appeared in old French chanson de geste, the Chanson de Roland, dating from the 11th century. In later chansons his role is expanded, for instance in La Chevalerie Ogier de Danemarche, where he first fights for 7 years against Charlemagne and his son Charlot. After the peace had been established Ogier fought at the side of Charlemagne against the Saracens. Holger became a national hero of the legendary past of Danmark. An opera called Holger Danske had a considerable impact on Danish nationalism in the late 18th century. (Source Wikipedia). The book contains also a part (8 pages) of a song on the battle between the King of the Goths Theodoric and Holger in Danish vernacular. This song is from the celebrated collection of Danish ballads called Kiempeviser. § Bartholin asserts in his dissertatio, his first fruits, which he wrote when he was 17 years old, that there is much truth in the old fable of Ogier. His original name was, according to Bartholin Olaus, i.e. Olof or Ulf, in English/German Wolf, a Danish prince. An old French chronicle made him one of the Pairs of Charlemagne. Thomas Bartholin was from 1684 Professor at the university of Copenhagen, and is best known for his Antiquitatum danicarum de causis contemptæ a Danis adhuc gentilibus mortis libri tres ex vetustis codicibus & monumentis hactenus ineditis congesti, Copenhagen 1689) (Collation: a8, b4; A-N8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120504 Euro 225,00
BASILIUS. Basilii Magni Caesariensium in Cappadocia Antistitis sanctissimi Opera plane divina, variis e locis sedulo collecta & accuratione ac impensis I. Badii Ascensii recognita & coimpressa, quorum Index proxima pandetur charta. (Paris), Jodocus Badius, 1520. Folio. (10),178 leaves. H.calf. 30 cm (Ref: Hoffman p. 412; Renouard II,145/6; Moreau 1511-1520: 2246; not in Brunet, or Ebert) (Details: 19th century binding. Back gilt, and with a red morocco letterpiece; marbled leather-lookalike paper on covers; marbled endpapers; title with woodcut borders with allegorical scenes & fable animals; in the heart of the title a large woodcut printer's device depicting the 'prelum Ascensianum'; the date, 1520 is repeated in the impressum on the last page) (Condition: Cover worn at extremities; front joint starting to crack; old ownership entry on title; right & left lower corner of title skillfully restored; occasional old ink marginalia; margins, or part of the margins of ca. 8 leaves have been repaired skillfully. Two small, not irritating wormholes in the preliminary leaves; the last page is skillfully mounted; the 2 leaves with the 'epistola nuncupatoria' by J. Argyropulus, have erroneously been bound by the binder immediately between leaf II & III) (Note: Jodocus Badius, 1462-1535, was an influential scholar and a pioneer of the printing industry. He taught Latin & Greek in Lyon. His Parisian firm became famous for its Erasmus and Budé editions. This is the second Latin translation of Basilius, 'opera et studio Jacobi Fabri Stapulensis'. The first one dates from Rome 1515. The editor Jacobus Faber Stapulensis (Jacques Lefèvre d'Étaples) is best known for his translation of the New Testament into French, which became the basis of all subsequent Bible translations into French. Only a few other works of Basilius had been published before 1520; the translators mentioned are Johannes Argyropulus, Georgius Trapezuntius, Raffaele Maffei & Rufinus Aquileiensis; the book contains also a translation of the 'Monodia Gregorii Nazianzeni in Magnum Basilium') (Provenance: Written below the engraving on the title: ex libris Missionariorum a Sto Spiritu. Ownership entry of one 'De la Bournée' in lower margin) (Collation: A10 (A9 & A10 erroneously bound after A2); A-X8 Y6 Z4 (Z4 verso blank). (Photographs on request).
Book number: 088152 Euro 1400,00
BECK,M.F. Monumenta Antiqua Judaica, Augustae Vindel. reperta, & enarrata, cum Mantissa III. Monum. vetustorum Roman., operis Velseriani de antiquis Monum. August. appendice quadam. Studio Matthiae Friderici Beckii. Augsburg, (Augustae Vindel.), Apud Viduam Theoph. Goebelii, Typis Koppmayerianis impressa, 1686. 8vo. 62,(2) p., 2 engraved plates. Modern marbled boards. 16 cm (Ref: VD17 1:060593L) (Details: Title in red and black. Occasional Hebrew texts and inscriptions. Two engraved plates of two sides of the four-sided Roman monument of one Aelius Montanus Haederanus found in Augsburg, and erected in the garden of the Aedes Peutingeriana; good quality paper) (Condition: Two plates depicting two sides of the four-sided Roman monument have been removed) (Note: The German orientalist Matthias Friedrich Beck, 1649-1701, studied in Jena oriental languages and literature. In 1672 he received a stipendium from the city of Augsburg to finish his studies. From 1677 onward he played an important role in this city. He is said to have had a great knowledge of Hebrew and other Semitic languages. (ADB 2, 218). In the first 44 p. of this booklet 8 medieval Hebrew inscriptions which were to be found in the city of Augsburg, are elaborately discussed. In the appendix Beck publishes 3 inscriptions which had escaped one way or the other the attention of the Augsburg humanist Marcus Velser. Marcus Velser, or Velserus, 1558-1614, was a city official of Augsburg (Patricius Augustanus & Duumvir) and humanist. He contributed e.g. to the great Corpus of ancient inscriptions of Janus Gruter, which was published in 1602. He also corresponded with the famous J. Scaliger. Velserus wrote about the history of his native city. Augsburg, or in Latin Augusta Vindelicorum was founded by the Romans in 15 BC. Beck tries in his treatise to reconstruct the history of the Jews in Augsburg from early medieval times. Before that he sketches the history of the diaspora ever since the destruction of the s econd temple in Jerusalem in 70 A.D. Beck looks for Jewish traces in the topography, and investigates offical texts and annals of the city, written during the Middle Ages. Beck was certainly not an anti-semite. He compiles from all kinds of local texts a very sad list of miserable occurrences. He never accuses the Jews of anything, but on the other hand he also never condems the cruel treatment of the Jews by the inhabitants of the city or their representatives. Beck explains that, because no effort has hitherto been put into the collecting of Jewish inscriptions in Germany, he decided to publish 8 Jewish inscriptions found in the city. He elaborately comments upon the linguistic and historical background of the inscriptions. The oldest inscription dates according to Beck from 693, the second from 991. The last one he discusses dates from 1446. § Beck's best known work is Martyrologium ecclesiae Germanicae pervetustum, Augsburg 1687. § See for the history of Jewish Augsburg and its Jewish monuments: Yehuda Shenef, 'When even cedars fall in flames …' Some explanatory notes on history and remnants of the Medieval Jewish Cemetery of Augsburg called Judenkirchhof, 2011) (Collation: A-D8, leaf D8 recto errata, leaf D8 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120505 Euro 225,00
BEDA VENERABILIS. Homiliae Venerabilis Bedae Presbyteri Anglosaxonis, theologici celeberrimi, hyemales, quadragesimales de tempore, item & sanctis, nunc denuo summa diligentia restitutae. Adiectis aliquot Homiliis eiusdem hactenus desideratis. Cologne (Coloniae), Ioannes Gymnicus excudebat, 1541. 8vo. (XVI),699,(3) p. Calf. 16 cm Rare text in a rare binding (Ref: 1 VD 16 B 1432; not in Brunet) (Details: Back with 4 thick raised bands; both covers blindstamped: floral borders, surrounding a medallion which is flanked by two angels; the medallion has in the centre the portrait of a bearded man; around this head: 'ADRIANUS VAN HOOLWICK 1528'; At the University Library of Amsterdam the remains of a similar binding are preserved. (See P. Verheyden: Een band van Adrianus van Hoolwick, in Tijdschrift voor Bibliotheek en Boekwezen, 5 (1907) p. 39/41). Some woodcut initials) (Condition: Cover rubbed & scratched; corners bumped. The leather is loosening at the right fore edge of the upper board. A small leather strip is removed from the outer edge of the lower board. The front pastedown is worn and there are 2 stamps on front flyleaf. The flyleaf at the end has been pasted onto the pastedown. The edges of the the title are slightly thumbed) (Note: This is the second edition of winter homilies of the Anglo-Saxon monk and scholar Beda Venerabilis, 672/673-735, published by Gymnicus in Cologne. Gymnicus' first edition dates from 1534. The collection consist of 3 parts, the 'Homiliae Hyemales de Tempore' , 15 Advent homilies for the seasons, to accompany the solemn religious observance in the liturgical calendar of the Advent, which is a time of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Birth of Christ; the 'Homiliae Quadragesimales', 22 homilies for the Lent, in Latin Quadragesima (Fortieth), a solemn religious observance that begins on Ash Wednesday and covers a period of approximately six weeks before Easter Sunday, or Resurrection Sunday, when the resurrection of Christ is celebrated; 'Homiliae Hyemales de Sanctis', 16 winter-homilies on the Saints, the first of which is for the day of Saint Andreas, 30 november, the name day of that Saint. Andreas was a disciple of John the Baptist, who announced the 'advent' of Christ. As the homilies are written in Latin it is supposted that Bede held or wrote them for clerics. His sources were the Church Fathers, but he used also all kinds of fables and legends, and allegories. § The homily or sermon is a central part of Christian worship. 'It can be defined as a religious discourse delivered to an audience by a preacher who gives instruction on questions of faith and morals'. And although the genre is at root oral, 'it served not only for preaching but also for private or public reading, such as the private study, or communal refectory reading prescribed in the Rule of St. Benedict'. (Mantello/Rigg, 'Medieval Latin, an introduction and bibliographical guide', Washington, 1996, ' p. 659) The form of the early medieval homily is primarily known from the works of Gregrorius Magnus and his continuer Beda Venerabilis, where 'the homily gives a sequential exegesis of an entire pericope', i.e of a set of verses that forms one coherent unit or thought. (Idem, ibidem) The homily has as its point of departure a biblical or liturgical lection. 'The preacher or author selects key words from the lection and uses them to develop a motif or theme'. (Idem p. 660) The style of early medieval homilies draws on the language and imagery of the Bible and early church fathers, like Augustine. 'Carolingian legislation stressed the didactic function of preaching and the need to expound correct doctrine'. (Idem, ibidem) § The Anglo-Saxon Beda Venerabilis is considered to be one of the foremost scholars of the early Middle Ages. Bede wrote about 40 historical and theological books. He promulgated in his 'De Temporum Ratione' , a work on chronology, the 'anno domini' method invented earlier by Dionysius Exiguus, which started the chronology of our Common Era, or Christian Era, with the birth of Christ in the year 0. Nowadays he is best known for his 'Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum', the 'Ecclesiastical History of the English People', and is appropriately called the Father of English History. His theological and educational works were of course of greater interest for christians in the Carolingian age. Bede's homilies, which are principally a kind of exigetical commentaries, 'provide instructions for observing liturgical feasts and for cultivating certain virtues while avoiding their corresponding vices'. (Mantello & Rigg, p. 660) § As a fill-up the editor has added at the end: 'Precatio matutina ad Omnipotentem Deum, Decio Ausonio autore') (Provenance: Stamp of the Bibliotheca Warmondana on front flyleaf. This must be the library of the "Groot-seminarie Warmond', of the diocese Haarlem, which was closed down in 1967. § The second stamp: 'Voorgoed in bruikleen afgestaan door de parochie Uitgeest') (Collation: *8 A-2V8 2X8 (minus 2X8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120216 Euro 900,00
BEDA VENERABILIS. Homiliae Venerabilis Bedae Presbyteri Anglosaxonis, theologici celeberrimi, Aestiuales, de tempore, item & Sanctis, nunc denuo summa diligentia restitutae. Adiectis aliquot Homiliis eiusdem hactenus desideratis Cologne (Coloniae), Excudebat Ioannes Gymnicus, 1541. 8vo. (XVI),625 (recte 623),(1 blank) p. Contemporary calf over wooden boards. 17 cm (Ref: VD16 B 1433; not in Brunet, Ebert & Graesse) (Details: Back with three thick raised bands. Boards blindstamped: in the central panel there are three flowers (roses?) surrounded by broad borders, filled with repeating pictures of Venus, Lucretia, Judith, and of one Vordidu. (This last one might be Fortitudo, one of the cardinal virtues; on the palm of her right hand seems to rest a big candle or a miniaturized pillar, symbols of strength. The phonetic similarity between F and V might be responsible for the spelling mistake. Vortitudo for Fortitudo seems to occur more often.) Brass clasps on both boards, the brass catches are however gone) Condition: Binding scuffed, back rubbed. Front joint partly cracked. Boards scratched. Corners bumped. Title slightly soiled; Two small tears in margins of the title. The outer margins of the paper of the second leaf are thin and showe defects, not affecting the text) (Note: This is the second edition of summer homilies of the Anglo-Saxon monk and scholar Beda Venerabilis, 672/673-735, published by Gymnicus in Cologne. Gymnicus' first edition dates from 1534. The collection consist of 2 parts, the 'Homiliae Aestivales (tam dierum Profestorum, quam Festorum, secundum temporis seriem digesta)', to accompany the solemn religious observance in the liturgical calendar of the summer semester, and held on sundays and christian holy days of observation; and 'Homiliae aestivales de Sanctis', summer homilies on the Saints. Added at the end is a section of 'Homiliae Variae'. As the homilies are written in Latin it is supposted that Bede held or wrote them for clerics. His sources were the Church Fathers, but he used also all kinds of fables and legends, and allegories. § The homily or sermon is a central part of Christian worship. 'It can be defined as a religious discourse delivered to an audience by a preacher who gives instruction on questions of faith and morals'. And although the genre is at root oral, 'it served not only for preaching but also for private or public reading, such as the private study, or communal refectory reading prescribed in the Rule of St. Benedict'. (Mantello/Rigg, 'Medieval Latin, an introduction and bibliographical guide', Washington, 1996, ' p. 659) The form of the early medieval homily is primarily known from the works of Gregrorius Magnus and his continuer Beda Venerabilis, where 'the homily gives a sequential exegesis of an entire pericope', i.e of a set of verses that forms one coherent unit or thought. (Idem, ibidem) The homily has as its point of departure a biblical or liturgical lection. 'The preacher or author selects key words from the lection and uses them to develop a motif or theme'. (Idem p. 660) The style of early medieval homilies draws on the language and imagery of the Bible and early church fathers, like Augustine. 'Carolingian legislation stressed the didactic function of preaching and the need to expound correct doctrine'. (Idem, ibidem) § The Anglo-Saxon Beda Venerabilis is considered to be one of the foremost scholars of the early Middle Ages. Bede wrote about 40 historical and theological books. He promulgated in his 'De Temporum Ratione' , a work on chronology, the 'anno domini' method invented earlier by Dionysius Exiguus, which started the chronology of our Common Era, or Christian Era, with the birth of Christ in the year 0. Nowadays he is best known for his 'Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum', the 'Ecclesiastical History of the English People', and is appropriately called the Father of English History. His theological and educational works were of course of greater interest for christians in the Carolingian age. Bede's homilies, which are principally a kind of exigetical commentaries, 'provide instructions for observing liturgical feasts and for cultivating certain virtues while avoiding their corresponding vices'. (Mantello & Rigg, p. 660) § As a fill-up the editor has added at the end: 'Precatio matutina ad Omnipotentem Deum, Decio Ausonio autore') (Collation: *8, A-2Q8 (leaf 2Q8 verso blank)(Irregular pagination in gathering B) Photographs on request.
Book number: 120337 Euro 725,00
BENEDICTUS. Den regel van den Heyligen Vader Benedictus, Abt ende Patriarch der Monincken in den Westen. Nieuws over-geset uyt het Latijn in de Nederduytsche tale, door eenen Religieus van de Abdije van S. Salvator, der Ordere van Cisteaux. Tweeden druck. Antwerp ('t Antwerpen), By de Wed. vander Hey, op de Meir, in den H. Geest. Met Approbatie, n.d. (ca. 1768) 12mo. 150,(6) p. Calf 12.2 cm (Ref: A. Welkenhuysen, Benedicti Regula belgice, over bibliografie van Benedictus-vertalingen en oude drukken van de 'Regel' in het Nederduits', in Zetesis, Album amicorum, door vrienden en collaga's aangeboden aan Prof. Dr. E. de Strycker, Antw., Utrecht, 1954, p. 396-415, especially p. 412-415; Bibl. Cath. Neerl. Impr. 1954, p. 469, no. 15284) (Details: Back with 3 raised bands. Gilt floral motive in the 4 compartments. Engraved printer's mark on the title, depicting the radiant dove of the Holy Ghost amidst clouds) (Condition: Upper corners of the boards abraded. Front flyleaf removed) (Note: Benedictus of Nursia, ca. 480 - ca. 550 A.D., is the Father of western monachism. In 519 he founded on the Monte Casino the Archabbey of the Benedictine Order. Wanting to reform monasticsm he composed ca. 540 his Regula monachorum(Rules for monks), in which he expressed his Ora et Labora-spirituality in 73 chapters. Until this day this Regula exercises influence. 'The Rule is marked by prudence and humanity, and leads by observance and obedience to the perfect following of Christ. It is safeguarded and applied by a patriarchal abbot, chosen by his monks, with full authority, who is directed to take counsel and to care for the individual. The chief task and central act of the community is the Divine Office (opus Dei) which with private prayer, spiritual reading, and work fills the day. All monks must renounce private ownership, though the monastery may own property; the regime is austere but not exacting' (L. Dysinger, St. John's Seminary, Camarillo, online article). The first translation of the Regula into Dutch dates from 1373, (OiN p. 122). The oldest printed Dutch translation appeared in Bruges in 1625, and was produced by Hendrik vanden Zype, since 1616 abbott of S. Andries neffens Brugghe, primarily, it seems, for the female followers of Benedictus in Bruges. There was in that time an open conflict in Bruges between the bischop and the abbess of the Benedictinesses. The aim of this translation seems to have been to put the Benedictinesses of Bruges in their place. In the dedication of the1625 edition we are told that it was made ad utilitatem et commoditatem Religiosarum Benedictinarum. In 1629 a new updated version of this translation was published in Douai (in the North of France), a catholic bulwark of the Contrareformation against the spreading of the protestantism in the Low Countries. This edition was probably also produced for the Benedictinesses, but now of Douai, for on the title is a citation of the Church Father Athanasius, Logos sôtêrias pros tên parthenon. A new translation of the Regula appeared in 1694 in Antwerp. The Flemish latinist Andries Welkenhuysen has compared the translation of 1625 with the one of 1694 and concluded that the translation was not new at all, but that the anonymous Religieus van de Abdije van S. Salvator, der Ordere van Cisteaux (Cistercian monk of the Abbey of S. Salvator) mentioned on the title simply made an aggiornamento of the edition of Bruges. This edition of 1694 was used for a second edition which was published by the widow Vander Hey in Antwerp. There is no date on the title. Welkenhuysen finds, that this second edition is, apart from some orthographica identical with that one of 1694. It even repeats the approbatio of 1694 at the end. The date of publication of this second edition is between 1747, the year that Coenraad Ignatius vander Hey died, and his wife took over, and 1772, the year the widow died. Welkenhuysen has compared all the books printed by the widow vander Hey concerning (the wear of) the typeface, the printer's mark, and the bibliographic address. He found that the widow used the copper engraving of the printer's mark of this book, the dove of the Holy Ghost, only for 3 books, 2 times in 1756, and 1 time for this undated book. The exact same wording of the imprint, 't Antwerpen, by de Wed. vander Hey, op de Meir, in den H. Geest' occurs only once, in an edition of 1768. Therefore Welkenhuysen dates this book ca. 1768. This book seems to be rare. We located only one copy in a Dutch library (erroneously dated 1694), a copy in the University Library of Gent and 2 copies in the University Library of Leuven. There is not yet a copy recorded in STCV or Beledimar) (Collation: A-F12 G6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120535 Euro 260,00
BERNARDINUS SENENSIS. (BERNARDINUS OF SIENA) Sancti Bernardini Senensis ... Opera omnia, synoptibus ornata, postillis illustrata, necnon variis tractatibus, & eximiis, praecipue in Apocalypsim, commentariis locupleta, opera et labore R.P. Joannis DE LA HAYE Parisini. Cum indicibus locupletissimis. Editio novissima, Lugdunensi postrema emendatior, & nitidior. Venice (Venetiis), In aedibus Andreae Poletti, 1745. Folio. 5 vols. in 4: 57,(7),351,(94); (8),476,(62); (12),489,(30); (8),278,(32);(6),129,(9) p. Contemporary boards. 38 cm (Ref: Brunet 1,796; not in Ebert) (Details: Titles in red & black; IHS vignette in the middle of titles; the half title of volume 1 has been replaced by a contemporary full-page engraving of Bernardinus at full length) (Condition: Covers very scuffed, especially at the extremities; stamp on title; partly foxed; waterstain in the lower margin of the last volume) (Note: Saint Bernardino of Siena, 1380-1444, was a famous wandering missionary preacher and a religious reformer. In Siena he joined the Franciscans. Bernardinus became so widely popular that he acquired enemies, who accused him of heresy. He was acquitted. This edition of Jean de La Haye (et alii) was published in 1635 in Paris, and was repeated in 1750 in Lyon, and in Venice in 1745. Jean de La Haye (1593-1661) was a French Franciscan preacher and Biblical scholar) (Collation: vol. 1: a-d6 (minus leaf a1, replaced by engraved plate) e8 A-2C6 2D-2H4, +-11+4, 12+4 (minus leaf 12+4). vol. 2: a4 A-2N6 2O-2R4 2S6, +-8+4 (minus leaf 8+4). vol. 3: *6 A-2P6 2Q-2Y4. vol. 4: *4 A-X6 Y-2D4. vol. 5: A-L6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 071181 Euro 450,00
BEROALDUS, PHILIPPUS. Varia Philippi Beroaldi opuscula in hoc Codice contenta. * Orationes: praelectiones; & Praefationes: & quaedam mithicae Historiae Philippi Beroaldi. * Item Plusculae Angeli Politiani; Hermolai Barbari atque una Iasonis Maini ad serenissimum Maximilianum invictissimum Rhomanorum imperatorem Oratio. * Epigrammata ac ludicra quaedam facilioris musae carmina eruditissimi viri Philippi Beroaldi ab Ascensio nuper eludicata: nunc demum coimpressa & eo ordine disposita, ut maxime moralia sint omnium prima. * L. Coelii Lactantii Firmiani pia Nenia verbis Christi domini crucifixi, sua in nos beneficia commemorantis. * Item Phi. Beroaldi de septem sapientium sententiis Libellus. * Eiusdem Symbola Pythagorae moraliter explicata. * De optimo statu, & de foelicitate. * Declamatio Philosophi medici & oratoris. * Declamatio ebriosi, scortatoris & aleatoris. * Oratio autem proverbialis caeteris apposita est. * Eiusdem Opusculum de terraemotu & pestilentia. N.pl. (Basel), n.d. (1513) (Colophon at the end: 'Orationes & Opuscula Philippi Beroaldi Bononien(sis) oratoris & poetae disertissimi finiu(n)t foeliciter Basileae exarata, Anno a partu Virginis salutifero, 1513) 8vo. 162 leaves. Modern half pigskin over wooden boards. 21 cm (Ref: VD16 B 2135; Renouard, Bibliographie des impressions et des oeuvres de Josse Badius Ascensius, II, p. 169 (Philippus Beroaldus, Varia Opuscula no. 6) (Details: Modern binding, antique style. On the frontcover has been preserved an old (original?) strip of vellum, which bears a pattern of blindstamped 5 lozenges filled with doubleheaded aegles, above their heads a crown. 3 raised bands on the back; 2 clasps & catches; 2 small contemporary inscriptions of one hand on the title, both references to passages in the book: 'Asinus Asinius Pollio : 90' and ' Oeconomia : 123'; most capitals at the beginning of sentences are carefully rubricated; in the margins of the first 123 pages are written many short notes, mostly catchwords, with the same contemporary red ink; at the end in the same hand a kind of table of content in black ink; occasional underlinings in red ink; according to VD16 is the printer of this book Gregor Barthelomaeus, a rather obscure printer) (Condition: title somewhat soiled; the blank verso of the last leaf has been pasted on a blank leaf, probably the flyleaf of the original. On the verso of this blank leaf is written the above mentioned table of content; faint waterstain in the upper margin of the last 18 leaves) (Note: This book consists of a collection of speeches, treatises and Neolatin poetry of the Italian humanist classical scholar Filippo Beroaldo (Philippus Beroaldus), 1453-1505. It contains for the greater part prose, i.e. speeches on classical topics, and examples of oratory, including some pieces of Polizziano and Ermelao Barbaro. It contains also an essay on the sentences, or sayings of the Seven Wise Philosophers, and an important essay on the symbolism in the doctrine of Pythagoras. We find also some declamations, e.g. a witty conversation of a drunk and his friends, a whore-hopper and a gambler. There is also poetry, e.g 'Paeanes Beatae Mariae Virginis', which is a Latin adaptation of a number of poems of Petrarca, epigrams, but also verse in a lighter vein (facilioris musae). All poems are surrounded by commentary. Beroaldus was professor of literature of the University of Bologna, his native city, from 1472 till his death. He was widely known for his erudition. His most important contribution to scholarship are his good editions of Latin Classics. He published texts and excellent commentaries of Plinius Maior, Apuleius, Gellius, Suetonius, Catullus, Propertius and Plautus, editions in which he proved is vast knowledge and command of Latin literature, from the patristic authors to contemporary scholars. He was one of the founders a 'of new annotative, miscellanistic commentary style' His latinity was rebuked because his style resembled more that of Apuleius than of Cicero. Beroaldus compiled this collection and had it printed on the request (te impulsore) of 'Martinus Boemus', whom he calls in the short 'praefatio' on the verso of the title his pupil. This pupil is also known as Martin(us) Mares Martinus Crumloviensis. He studied 6 years under Beroaldus, from 1487 till 1493. Thereupon he returned home, to Krumlow in Bohemia. ('Filippo Beroaldo l'Ancien', S. Fabrizio-Coast & F. La Brasca, Bern, Lang, 2005, p. 8). The first edition of these speeches, called 'varia opuscula' was published in 1491 in Bologna, and was reproduced several times by the Parisian printer Badius Ascensius. The first editions produced by Ascensius from 1505 contained only the orations of Beroaldus, mostly on topics of classical philology, some on contemporary history. They fill the first 61 leaves of our 1513 edition. The second part of this book begins with the collection of verse. The unknown printer repeats on the verso of leaf 61 at the beginning of this second part simply (and shamelessly?) the title under which Ascensius had published (nuper) the poetry in Paris, in the same year of 1513. The rest (the last 70 leaves) of the book is filled with philosophical letters, declamations and treatises of Beroaldus in Latin, which were likewise borrowed from previous editions of Ascensius, e.g. a declamation 'an orator sit philosopho & medico anteponendus', and other usefull subjects for humanist school education. At the end have been added 11 p. with 'Annotationes in Galenum', because, so explains Beroaldus, much mention was made of Galenus in the preceding chapter on 'pestilentia'. Beroaldus must have been very popular in his time. The bibliography of Renouard on Ascensius numbers 74 different editions, of which 12 with the title 'varia opuscula', of his orations, declamations, letters and poetry in the first 20 years of the 16th century) (Provenance: The writer of the numerous red marginalia is unknown) (Collation: A-T8, V4, Y6 ) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130436 Euro 1900,00
BERONICIUS. P.J. Beronicii Georgarchontomachia, caeterorumque ejus carminum sylvula; quorum prius carmine belgico secutum. Boeren- en overheids-stryd, en de overige gedichten van P.J. Beronicius, welkers eerste in Nederduitsche vaarzen is nagevolgd door J.B. Waar by gevoegd is het zonderling leven des dichters; een goed aantal van Nederduitsche aanteekeningen; en een keurig zestal van fraaije koperen platen. Te Goes & Middelburg, Bij Jacobus Huysman & Jeroen van de Sande, J.z., 1766. 8vo. XX,178 p. Modern half vellum 22 cm (Ref: Best source: C.J. Krijger, 'P.J. Beronicius Boeren- en Overheidsstryd, 1673'. Doctoraal scriptie 1986, Reliable: Winkler Prins 6e dr., vol. 3, p. 777; also important: Sizoo, Hermeneus 8 (1936) p.17/21; uncritical: Van der AA 2,442/45; NNBW 8,88) (Details: Tasteful antique style binding, with a red morocco shield on the back. Frontispiece & six scenes on three plates by Simon Fokke. The frontispiece depicts the crowning with a laurel wreath by Apollo of a beggarly fellow, who wears ragged clothing. In the distance we see the townscape of Middelburg, in the front a pile of books and the attributes of a chimney sweep; on the plates scenes of armed and angry mobs. On the verso of the title the signature of one of the publishers J. Huysman. At the end have been added 22 pages with 'adnotationes ad Georgarchontomachiae librum 1 & 2' by Petrus Rabus, followed by 20 pages filled with annotations of J.B. in Dutch) (Condition: A light brown stain on the lower margin of 3 leaves) (Note: In 1672, on the 21st of july, a false rumour swept over the Dutch island of Walcheren: 'The French fleet is landing'. These were combustable times, called in Dutch 'het rampjaar' i.e. the year of disasters, when the Dutch Republic was besieged from all quarters. At this rumour a furious mob of armed farmers invaded Middelburg, the capital of the province of Zeeland. The mob assaulted and arrested city officials considered to be traitors. In the next year a mock epic concerning this historic event was published in Amsterdam 'auctore N. Autopte', i.e. by Mr. Eyewitness. In 1676 the remonstrant minister Anthony Borremans (who died in 1683), a man well versed in Greek and Latin, reported in the 6th chapter of his Variae Lectiones that the author was one Petrus Johannes Beronicius. He procured also a biographic sketch of this Beronicius which seems to be the starting point of a mystification. Borremans tells that he and some gentlemen (J. Antonides van der Goes, Dirk Buysero, Johan Frederik Gymnich) once ran in Middelburg into a pityful drunk, who composed Latin verse incredibly fast and on the spot. He was a man of loose morals, who earned his living sweeping chimneys and grinding knives. Nevertheless this dirty little fellow 'klein, roetzwart, rond en dik, oud en slordig gekleed', who also made strange gestures, was an accomplished neolatin poet. It was said that he spoke his Latin too fast even for the classical scholar J.F. Gronovius, when they met. He also spoke Greek fluently, and could speak judiciously and scholarly about classical authors. This wonder of the world had witnessed the revolt of the farmers, and, knowing his Homer very well, produced extempore a burlesque epic about the event, the Georgarchontomachia. In february 1673 this colourful drunk was found dead in a ditch. The classical scholar and neolatin poet Petrus Rabus, 1660-1702, published in 1691 an new edition of this satyrical follow-up of the Homeric Batrachomyomachia, accompanied by a translation into Dutch and annotations. He also followed the biography by Borremans. The Latin text was published and translated once again by one J.B. in 1766. J.B. also printed the biographic sketch of Borremans, and added 20 pages of notes in Dutch of his own. The biographic data of this versifying chimney sweep were reproduced indiscriminately in later biographic surveys, like Van der Aa, and NNBW. STCN suggests that Dirk Buysero, 1644-1708, a city official of the city of Vlissingen (Flushing), who was one of the men who met Beronicius, might be the real author. There is no evidence for this. It is even improbable. Buysero did not compose one syllable of neolatin poetry. Our guess is that it might be the scholar and soldier Joan van Broekhuizen (Janus Broukhusius), 1649-1707, who was an intimate friend of Buysero and Van der Goes, and was himself an accomplished neolatin poet, and a translator. Stylistic research is needed here. A problem is that the name of J.P. Beronicius is not an invention or concoction. There exists in the city accounts of Middelburg a record of someone bearing his name, for producing some occasional verses) (Collation: *8, 2*2, A-L8, M1) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130030 Euro 250,00
BONAMICUS, CASTRUCCIUS. Castruccii Bonamici De rebus ad Velitras gestis commentarius. Ad Trojanum Aquavivam Aragonium S.R.E. Principem Cardinalem Montis Regalis Archiepiscopum, et potentissimorum Hispaniarum, atque utriusque Siciliae Regum ad Pontificem Maximum, Sedemque apostolicam Legatum. Editio nova, auctior. Curante Cornelio Valerio Vonck. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Marcum Michaelem Rey, 1748. 8vo. XXIV,64 p. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: IJsewijn, Companion, 2nd ed. 1,66; Michaud, Biographie Universelle, 1854 p. 147) (Details: 2 thongs laced through the joints. Green morocco label on the back. Marbled endpapers. Title in red and black. Engraved printer's mark of the French refugee printer/publisher Marc Michel Rey on the title, depicting a beehive: motto 'ingeniosa assiduitate') (Condition: Binding slightly curved and age-toned. Tail of the spine chafed. Back and morocco shield somewhat rubbed. A few tiny pinpoint spots of insect damage to the joints. A small and old ink annotation on the front flyleaf) (Note: This book is the first big success of the Italian soldier, historian and neolatin author Castruccio Buonamici, 1710-1761. He is considered te be one of the most elegant of the neolatin authors of the 18th century. After a short ecclesiastical career he enlisted in the army of the King of the Two Sicilies and Spain, Charles de Bourbon. In the war against the Austrians he distinguished himself in 1744 in the battle of Vellitri (Roman Velitrae). The Latin report of this battle by the cultivated warrior, 'De rebus ad Velitras etc.' was first published in 4to in 1746. A few years later he produced his 'Commentarii de Bello Italico', (Leiden 1750/51), a work which met with even greater success. Both works were reissued several times, and translated into French and English. Buonamici is praised for his elegant style, the power and depth of his ideas and his reliability. Both works of Buonamici were published also by the Dutch scholar Cornelius Valerius Vonck, 1725-1769, a man known as a judicious corrector of Latin authors. For 2 years he was professor at the university of Mannheim. This editionof 1748 is a new and augmented edition of 'De rebus ad Velitras etc.'. According to the impressum of the 1746 edition ('Lugduni Batavorum') it was first printed in Leiden. Vonck explains however in the prolegomena that the first edition of this book could not possibly have been printed in Leiden, because of the quality of the paper, and the printing type. And we know, he continues, that in some countries people have good reasons to conceal the 'genuinum typographi atque editionis locum'. (Praefatio p. VII). Vonck seems to be well informed, he calls himself 'non omnino harum rerum ignarus'. The first edition of 1746 must have been printed in the region where the author was born (Lucca), he concludes. Why he does not say. The book is dedicated to the cardinal Trojano Acquaviva, 1696-1747, bishop of Monreale. He represented in the Curia of the Vatican the interests of the King of Spain and the Sicilies, Charles III) (On Vonck see Van der Aa 19 327/8) (Collation: *8, 2*4; A-D8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130031 Euro 200,00
BONEFONIUS. Joannis Bonefonii Arverni, poëtae venustissimi Basia, Tam Latino, quam Gallico idiomate edita. Editio ultima, prioribus auctior longe atque emendatior. (Imitations du Latin de Jean Bonnefons; avec autres gayetez amoureuses, de l'invention de l'autheur) Leiden, Ex Typographia Nicolai Herculis, 1659. 12mo. 2 parts in 1 volume: (X),251,(1 blank) p. H.calf 12 cm (Ref: Brunet 1,1096; Willems 1693: 'jolie édition, imprimée en italiques'; Graesse 1,486; Ebert 2740) (Details: 19th century binding. Back ruled gilt, and with a green label. Marbled covers and endpapers. Two titles, 1 for the first part (p. 1-80) with the Latin text of the poems of Jean Bonnefons, and 1 for the second part (p. 81-251) which contains the French imitations by Gilles Durant. Woodcut printer's mark on both titles, depicting Hercules just having killed a monster with his club. The motto is: Virtus non territa monstris) (Condition: Binding worn at the extremes. Some wear to the paper on the boards. Lacking the frontispiece) (Note: The French neolatin poet Jean Bonnefons, or Bonefonius, from Clermont/Auvergne, (1554-1614) is the last great poet of the 'first great age of French Neo-Latin poetry'. IJsewijn calls him a 'belated Petrarchan singer'. (IJsewijn p. 135) He was one of the best known poets who followed the footsteps of the famous Dutch poet of erotic verse Janus Secundus, 1511-1536. The Basiorum liber of Bonefonius, also called, Basia, or Pancharis after the woman he tries to seduce with his Kisses, is preceded by a laudatory poem of Josephus Scaliger, and followed by his own erotic Pervigilium Veneris, and a poem on the city of Dijon, the Tumultus Gallicus and many other occasional poems. According to Willems the principal interest of this book lies in the 'Imitations du latin etc.' The author of these imitations is Gilles Durant, sieur de la Bergerie, 1550-1615. Durant was a fellow townsman and close friend of Bonefons. The collection of Durant first appeared in 1587, and was republished several times. (Nouvelle Biographie Générale, 15, p. 435/36) Durant belongs to 'les grands classiques'. A beautiful performance of one of his songs, Ma belle, si ton âme, can be heard on Youtube. According to Willems this booklet was the work of the Leiden publisher Fr. Hackius) (Provenance: Old label on the front pastedown of 'Burgersdijk & Niermans, Boekhandel en Antiquariaat, 'Templum Salomonis', Leiden') (Collation: *6 (minus leaf *1), A-K12, L6 (leaf L6 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120506 Euro 260,00
BONEFONIUS. Johannis Bonefonii Arverni carmina. London (Londini), Ex officina Jacobi Tonson, & Johannis Watts, 1720. 12mo XI,(1 blank),75,(1 blank) p. 19th century half morocco 15 cm (Ref: IJsewijn p. 135; Graesse 1,486; ) (Details: Gilt short title on the back; title in red & black; woodcut printer's mark on the title, showing all kinds of symbols of wisdom and science) (Condition: Wear to the extremities; upper margin partly and lightly waterstained) (Note: The French Neo-Latin poet Jean Bonefons, or Johannes Bonefonius in Latin, (Clermont/Auvergne, 1554-1614) is the last great poet of the 'first great age of French Neo-Latin poetry'. IJsewijn calls him a 'belated Petrarchan singer'; (IJsewijn p. 135). Of the poets who followed the footsteps of the Dutch erotic poet Janus Secundus, he was one of the best known. They are often found together in later editions of erotic poetry, often together with the juvenile poems of Muretus and Beza. The collection of Bonefons's carmina is preceded by a laudatory poem of the French genius Josephus Justus Scaliger, 1540-1609. Then follows the erotic 'Basiorum liber', or 'Pancharis', a work Bonfonius wrote before his marriage. The Basia are followed by a poem on the city of Dijon, the 'Tumultus Gallicus' and a collection of occasional poems. In the preface of this edition it is stated, that it follows the Leyden edition 'minime aspernandam' of 1659. The London publishers Tonson & Watts want, they say, to imitate the elegant editions of the Elzeviers. 'Elzevirianarum elegantiam voluimus imitari'. At the end of the carmina are unfortunately lacking the last 6 pages of the last gathering. These 6 pages consist of a short biography of 3 pages, in French, of Jean Bonefons, and a priggish list of 3 pages, with peccadilles, where an anynomous is splitting hairs on Bonefons's sins against pure latinity. Perhaps the owner found these pages superfluous, and left them out, taking to heart the advice of Tonson & Watts, when they write in the preface (p. IV): 'ad calcem' ... 'ibi quaedam notantur loca in quibus ab illo contra Latini sermonis aut carminis leges peccatum est; sed animadversiones illas maluimus discutiendas proponere lectoris judicio, quam nostrum pronuniciare') (Collation: A-G6, H2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120213 Euro 90,00
BRÜCKE,E. Grundzüge der Physiologie und Systematik der Sprachlaute für Linguisten und Taubstummenlehrer. Wien, Gerold, 1856. (V),134 p., 1 folding lithographed table. Binding gone 20 cm (Small bookplate of Robert Washington Oates on the verso of the title; See for Oates Wikipedia; see also Wikipedia for the importance of Ernst Wilhelm von Brücke; first edition of this classic on phonetics)
Book number: 114800 Euro 200,00
BUTTMANN,Ph. Lexilogus, or critical examination of the meaning and etymology of numerous Greek words and passages, intended principally for Homer and Hesiod. By Philip Buttmann, LL.D, late professor in the University of Berlin, and librarian of the Royal Library. Translated and edited with explanatory notes and copious indexes by J.R. Fishlake, late fellow of Wadham College, Oxford. Second edition, revised. London, John Murray, 1840. 8vo. XVI,597 p. Calf 22 cm (Details: Nice binding: Back with 5 raised bands and with gilt floral motives in the compartments.n Orange lettering label in the second compartment of the back. Boards with double fillet gilt borders; marbled endpapers; edges of the boards gilt, book block has marbled edges) (Condition: Some slight wear to the extremities; boards slightly scratched; blind stamp of 'W.J. Richards, Bookseller, High St. 104, Oxford' in the front flyleaf) (Note: Philipp Karl Buttmann, 1764-1829, was elected in 1806 a member of the Academy at Berlin, and was made in 1811 keeper of the Royal Library. His best-known work was his Griechische Grammatik (Greek grammar), first published in 1792, which saw a dozen or two expanded and revised editions. It was also translated into English, e.g. as a 'Greek grammar for the use of high schools and universities'. 'The introduction of this grammar led to a marked improvement in the Greek scholarship of the schools of Germany. In his Lexilogus he proves himself an acute investigator of the meanings of Homeric words, and displays a keen sense of the historic development of language, but is obvously unconscious of the importance of the principles of comparative philology'. (...) But his main strength lay in Greek grammar and Homeric lexicography'. (Sandys 3,84/85)) The editor/translator reverend Fishlake tells us in his preface to the Lexilogus that he improved the consultation of the work. 'I have made another minor alteration by a fresh arrangment of the Articles. Buttmann wrote and published as he met with a difficult or doubtful word in the course of his readings. I have arranged the Articles alphabetically'. (Preface p. IV) He calls his own additions 'very trifling', inserting them between brackets. Here and there he has added the opinions of the German lexicographers Schneider and Passow, where they happen to differ from Buttmann) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130203 Euro 125,00
CAESAR. C. Iulii Caesaris Commentarii, ab Aldo Manuccio Paulli F. Aldi N. emendati et scholiis illustrati. Ad Ill.mum atq. Excell.mum D. Iacobum Boncompagnum S.R.E. Gen. Gubern. Venice (Venetiis), Apud Aldum, 1588. 8vo. (CXL),596,(164)(47),(1 blank) p., 7 full page woodcut illustrations, 13 woodcut illustrations in the text; 2 folding maps. 18th century vellum. 15.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,44; Ebert 3267; Graesse 2,6; Brunet 1,1454; Renouard p. 240: a reissue with some alterations in the disposition of the Aldus-edition of 1575, cf Renouard p. 221) (Details: Two thongs laced through the joints. Gilt letterpiece of calf on the spine. Woodcut printer's mark on the title. Woodcut initials. Folding maps of Hispania and of Gallia. On the last 3 leaves a stocklist of Aldus: 'Libri de Stampa d'Aldo, che si trovano al presente') (Condition: Anchor and dolphin of the printer's mark are vaguely handcoloured brownish; Name at the bottom of the title. Ownership entry on front & rear pastedown. Small wormhole in the blank outer margin of the last leaf, slightly affecting also the last but one leaf) (Note: This Caesar edition was produced by the grandson of the famous Venetian humanistic scholar and printer Aldus Manutius, the founder of the Aldine Press. He was the son of Paullus Manutius, and the last member of that printers' dynasty. He died without heir in 1597. This Caesar edition is a reissue of those previously published in 1575 and 1559 by his father Paullus Manutius. Aldus Manutius the Younger added a commentary of his own. The 140 preliminary pages of this Caesar edition contain the preface to the Aldus edition of 1575 and of 1559; further a treatise of Johannes Jocundus (Jucundus) on animals and some defence devices; a treatise of Io. Buteo and of Leo Bapt. Albertus on the building of wooden bridges; a list of peoples, kings, towns and rivers in Gaul; a collection of testimonia on Caesar in the work of Cicero, collected by Fulvius Orsinus; fragments of several works of Caesar; the report on Caesar by the late antique historian Eutropius. At the end, after the text of Caesar, we find an alphabetic list of Gallic places, peoples, rivers and montains, compiled from the work of Caesar and Tacitus by Raymundus Marlianus; then ca. 70 pages commentary (called scholia) of Aldus Manutius the Younger) (Provenance: On the title the elegant 18th century (?) note: 'Ex libris Francisci Ferri'. There are several candidates for Franciscus Ferrus, or Francesco Ferri. On the front pastedown and the pastedown in the rear: 'Ex libris familiae Rossi, 1824'. There are quite a number of Rossi families in Italy. See e.g. Wikipedia 'Rossi, familia)) (Collation: A-H8, 2 folding maps, A-2O8, 2P2; 2a-2i8, 2k10; *-3*8 (leaf 3*8 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120030 Euro 1000,00
CAESAR. C. Julii Caesaris Quae exstant, ex viri docti accuratissima recognitione; accedit nunc vetus interpres graecus librorum VII de Bello Gallico, ex bibliotheca P. Petavii. Praeterea notae, adnotationes, commentarii, partim veteres, partim novi. Ad haec indices rerum, et locorum utiles. (...) Editio olim adornata opera et studio Gothofredi Jungermanni Lipsiensis, nunc auctior et comtior. Frankfurt (Francofurti), Sumptibus Johannis Davidis Zunneri, typis Pauli Hummii, 1669. 4to. (VIII),450;(8) p., 1050;112 columns, (12 index), (24 index) p., frontispiece, 3 folding maps, 17 small woodcuts. Vellum 24 cm (Ref: VD17 3:010056P; Schweiger 2,45; Dibdin 1,357/8; Moss 1,232/3) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints; short title in ink near the head of the spine. Architectural frontispiece engraved by Cl. Ammon, depicting a kind of mausoleum consisting of 2 thick pillars left and right, before which stands a statue of a soldier; on the edge of its roof a quote from Vergil's Aeneid: 'Nulla salus bello, pacem te poscimus omnes' (Aen. 11,362), and on the lintel a quote from Pindar, made famous by Erasmus: 'Dulce bellum inexpertis'; on a freeze at the bottom we see a fallen soldier, motto: 'Sic transit gloria mundi', possibly an adaptation of a phrase in Thomas à Kempis's 'De imitatione Christi': 'O quam cito transit gloria mundi'. Title in red & black; printer's device on the title, 2 bending trees, with the motto 'onerata renitor'. Three engraved maps, the world, Spain and Gallia; many woodcut initials; 17 woodcuts in the text, among which a map. The notes are preceded by a 'halftitle' dated 1606) (Condition: Vellum soiled, and very slightly damaged near the head of the spine; small marginal wormhole in the upper endpapers and the first 4 leaves, not affecting the text; lower edge of the frontispiece chipped; a few small waterstains on the right edge of the first 100 p.; some foxing in places; a few leaves are browning; a few small inkstains; the index to the first volume has erroneously been bound at the end of the second volume) (Note: This is an augmented edition of the edition of 1606, also published in Frankfort; In the edition of 1606 the Greek translation of the 7 books of the Bellum Gallicum was printed for the first time, the manuscript of which came, as the title says, from the library of Petavius; Ernesti, who says that the 1606 edition is to be recommended, thinks that the byzantine scholar/poet Maximus Planudes, ca. 1255-ca. 1305, might be the translator of the 'Bellum Gallum'. (Fabricius/Ernesti, Bibliotheca Latina vol. 1 p. 262). Schweiger calls the editions of 1606 and 1669 'schätzbar' because of the notes of Rhellicanus, Glareanus, Glandorp, Camerarius, Brutus, Manutius, Sambucus, Ursinus, Ciacconius, Hotmanus, and Brantius which are to be found in no other edition. We also find 16 pages filled with notes of Jungermann on the Greek translation; Dibdin calls the edition of 1606 a 'very excellent edition' 'Both the text and the notes do great credit to the refined taste and erudition of Jungermann'. Dibdin judges the 1669 edition to be 'incorrectly reprinted'. Jungermann did the same for Caesar what Janus Gruterus had done for Livy and Tacitus, he divided the text up into capita, to make the text easier accessible. Gottfried Jungermann was born in Leipzig in 1577 or 1578, and died in 1610. His mother was a daughter of the famous Joachim Camerarius, 1500-1574. In 1605 he published an edition of Longus, and in 1608 of Herodotus. His work on the ancient lexicographer Pollux had to wait one century for publication. In 1706 the Dutch classical scholar Hemsterhuis, 1685-1766, published his contributions in his edition of Pollux. (ADB 14, 709/11) (Collation: pi4 (including frontispiece), 3 maps, A-2E8, 2F2 (minus leaf 2F2); a4, b-2d8, 2e4, 2f-2l8, 2m4 (minus leaf 2m4, leaf 2m3 verso blank); A-C8, D4; +4, 2+2 (leaf 2+2 verso blank); A-C4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140099 Euro 300,00
CAESAR. C. Julius Cesars Aantekeningen der Gallische, Burgerlyke, Alexandrynsche, Africaansche, en Hispanische oorlogen. Uit het Latyn verduischt door Abraham Bogaert. Met kopere plaaten verciert. Amsterdam, By Nicolaas Ten Hoorn, Boekverkoper, 1709. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XVI),341 (recte 339),(26 index),(3 blank); (IV),381,(30 index),(3 blank) p., 12 engraved plates (of which 3 folding) Calf. 18 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 98,3; OiN p. 127; Schweiger 2,55) (Details: Backs gilt and with 5 raised bands; engraved printer's device on title, it depicts a kind of medal, with a resting Muse, at her feet a wreath, an opened book and a lyre; the legend reads Proficit et recreat; the medal rests on a collection of musical instruments and theatrical objects. The margins are uncut, the plates are in fine condition. The first plate of volume 1 is a portrait of Caesar, below his portrait is the famous murder scene; first plate of volume 2 is a portrait of Pompeius, below his portrait the murder of Pompeius) (Condition: Binding scuffed, boards slightly scratched and worn at the extremes. Backs rubbed. Front joint of the first volume is partly split. Endpapers renewed. Wee hole in p. 141/2 of volume 1) (Note: Throughout the 17th and 18th century in Europe the Roman historian Julius Caesar, 100-44 B.C., remained central to the education of the sons of the elite who trained for public life. He figured as an exemplary military leader. The politician and then tyrant Caesar however was much more controversial in Europe that was torn apart by bloody religious and civil wars. His dictatorship remained problematic, though some justified his usurpation of power as the only way out of turmoils of the Roman republic. In the Dutch republic Caesar's most stubborn opponent, the senator and patriot Marcus Porcius Cato Uticensis, the defender of republican freedom, was more appreciated. In the beginning of the 18th century however the mood in the Low Countries was different. The Dutch republic was involved in the War of Spanish Succession, 1701-1713, a war between a coalition of several European powers, the Dutch republic, Britain, Prussia and Portugal, called the Great Alliance, and the kingdoms of France and Spain. France was in that time by far the greatest power in Europe, and therefore the Alliance tried to prevent further expansion, in the South of Europe and in the America's. In 1708 the French army started an offensive in the Southern part of the Netherlands, where the Dutch priority had been to secure their barrier fortress system. The French took Brugge and Ghent by storm. The British army and the forces of the Dutch republic, under Marlborough succeeded in defeating the French, and to recapture the South of the Low Countries. During this War of Succession the Dutch army reached its greatest expansion, 120.000 men. The allied forces finally succeeded in preventing that France and Spain would be governed by the French king Louis XIV. § The dedicatee of this translation of Caesar Commentarii is the 'Raadspensionaris' (Prime Minister) of the Dutch Republic Antonius Heinsius, 'de tong der zeven Staaten / Daar Holland zich mag veilig op verlaaten, / In 't midden van den felsten oorlogsgloet, / Die Vrankryk nu zal lessen met zyn bloed.' (p. *2 recto) He will let the French pay with their blood. The translator Abraham Bogaert exhorts Heinsius to take the field once again, and follow the example of Caesar. 'Gelust het u ten slagvelde in te treên, / Te stappen langs een berg van lyken heen, / En Cesars tred te volgen, daar zyne enkels / In 't bloed staan op der Gallen groove schenkels.' (p. *2 verso) The French are on the verge of collapse, he rymes. 'Wat staaren niet de Gallen op zyn werken, op Schildpat, Ram, en Blyde, Wal en Gracht, / En grof Geschut, en Toorens, groot van kracht!' (Ibidem, idem). Bogaerts hopes that the example of Caesar, and also his own translation will inspire the 'Raadspensionaris' Heinsius. 'Zo Cesar nu, (...) / Uw doorziende oog in 't Neerduitsch kan bekooren, / Dan zal zyn naam met groter luister glooren, / Zyn dierbaare asch zich roeren, en in 't bloed / Des Bataviers ontsteken eenen moed, / Om Lodewyk ten rykstroone uit te klinken'. (p. *3 verso) In the following introduction Bogaert calls Caesar the 'grootste der Veldheeren', 'Een Held zeker, wiens beleid onnavorschelyk, wiens dapperheid onnavolgelyk is, en die met dezelve kracht van geest heeft gesprooken en geschreeven, met welke hij geoorloogt heeft'. (p. *4 recto) His language and style is exemplary. 'Zyne taale is de zuiverste der Latynen, zyne style zacht en teder; en heeft, hoe eenvoudig, iets edelers, dan Tactius met al de pracht zyner woorden'. (Idem, ibidem) A soldier or politician will find n Caesar all he needs, 'men vind daar in al 't geene nodig is om volkome Veldheeren, en deftige Staatkundigen te maaken'. (p. *5 recto) Caesar work is a book of hours (Getyboek) for soldiers. Bogaers used for his translation the edition of Caesar published in 1606 in Leiden by Plantin (Raphalengius) (p. *6 verso) § Abraham Bogaert, 1663-1727, was a well known Dutch playwright and poet. He translated also Juvenalis (1693), Suetonius (1699) and Valerius Maximus (1721) (NNBW 3,131/32) The ancient Roman republic did not seem remote or exotic to Bogaers. Instead, it served as an important precedent in politics and history) (Collation: *8, A-Z8 (leaf leaf Z7 verso and leaf Z8 blank) (Pagination irregular in gathering H: the page numbers 128/129 have been skipped); pi2, A-2C8 (leaf 2C6 verso blank; leaf 2C7 blank; minus leaf 2C8) (Plates at p. 1, 43, 191, 217, 225, 259, 301; 1, 69, 75, 143, 197)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120364 Euro 425,00
CALLIMACHUS. Callimachi Hymni, epigrammata et fragmenta ex recensione Theodori J.G.F. Graevii, cum ejusdem animadversionibus. Accedunt N. Frischlini, H. Stephani, B. Vulcanii, P. Voetii, A.T.F. Daceriae, R. Bentleii commentarius, et annotationes viri illustrissimi Ezechielis Spanhemii, nec non praeter fragmenta, quae ante Vulcanius & Daceria publicarant, nova, quae Spanhemius & Bentleius collegerunt, & digesserunt. Hujus cura & studio quaedam quoque inedita epigrammata Callimachi nunc primum in lucem prodeunt. Utrecht (Ultrajecti), Apud Franciscum Halmam, Guilielmum vande Water, 1697. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XXXII),1-438; 369-496,(138); (16),758,(64) p., frontispiece, 6 engraved plates, and occasional engraved text illustrations. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,429: 'Vorzügliche Werth erh. diese Ausg. durch Spanheim's u. Bentley's Noten'; Dibdin 1,368/69: 'An excellent and erudite edition' and the scholar 'will have abundant reason to rejoice in the acquisition of this edition'; Moss 1,249; Brunet 2,1481/2: 'Belle édition faisant partie de la collection Variorum'; Graesse 2,17; Ebert 3344) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints. The frontispiece depicts Callimachus while offering to the gods. Title of the first volume in red & black. Engraved printer's mark on the title, it depicts Athena and Ceres, who are holding between them a painting with an allegorical scene which shows people harvesting a crop. They are surrounded by putti, the motto is: 'cultior his vita est'; another and bigger version of the printer's mark on the second title. 6 plates, showing statues of Greek gods, drawn by G. Hoet, and etched by I. van Vianen. Greek text with opposing Latin translation, commentary & notes) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled; some gatherings are yellowing) (Note: The Greek poet and scholar Callimachus of Cyrene, c. 305 - c. 240 B.C. was given employment at the famous Alexandrian library. There he produced the first scientific literary history. 'It is clear that Callimachus was a poet of great originality and extraordinary refinement. His amazing productivity (...) was accompanied by bold experimentation in his poetry, and a great versatility of style. The scholarly element, it is true, often adds a frigidity to his verse, but the lively personal and realistic touches which appear, never allow his writings to degenerate into arid selections of obsure myths'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 195/6) This edition of the surviving works of Callimachus was prepaired by the Dutch scholar Theodorus Georgius Graevius (1669-1692), the promising son of the professor of Classics at the University of Utrecht, Johannes Georgius Graevius (1632-1703). The young man died when 23. The book was finished and published posthumously by his mourning father in 1697 with pain in his heart. 'Id non potest non gravissimum rescindere vulnus' he laments in the 'Dedicatio'. Johannes Georgius Graevius (Greffe), of German descent, was the last 42 year of his life a star of the first order which adorned the University of Utrecht. (Van der Aa 7,353/58 & Van der Aa 7,358). The young man, the father tells in the 'praefatio', was fascinated by Callimachus, and he was planning an edition of that poet with his own notes and commentary and that of others. Alas, an immature death took away the young man's hopes and promisses, but still he left his Callimachus finished. 'Non infrequenter' had he also corrected the Latin translation. When the German scholar Ezechiel Spanheim, 1629-1710, heard that the father was preparing the posthumous edition, he sent him all he had written about Callimachus. His 'In Callimachi Hymnos observationes' fill the second volume of the set. The fame of Graevius also enticed the 'splendissimum Britanniae lumen' Richard Bentley, 1662-1742, to send him old and new material, emendations and notes, he had on Callimachus in his portfolio. (On Spanheim see Sandys 2,327))(Collation: Volume I: *-2*8, A-B8 (minus leaf B8), C-Dd8, Ee4; aa-pp8, qq4 (between leaf ii3 and ii4 are bound 2 gatherings: +8, 2+4; leaf qq4 recto has 'aan den binder' (for the binder), where the irregular pagination of the first volume is explained) Volume II: *8, [A]-[Eee]8, [Fff]4 (leaf [Fff]4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130420 Euro 600,00
CAPELLE,A.G. VAN. Commentatio de Regibus et Antiquitatibus Pergamenis. (Amsterdam, 1842) VIII,172 p., 1 plate with coins, 1 folding map. Contemporary blue stiff wrappers 28 cm
Book number: 152696 Euro 150,00
CASSIODORUS. Magni Aurelii Cassiodori Senatoris V.C. Variarum libri XII, & Chronicon ad Theodericum regem. Iordani episcopi Ravennatis, De origine actibusque Getarum lib. I quo XII. Cassiodori libros de eadem historia complexus est. Ennodii Ticinensis episc. Panegyricus Theod. dictus. G. Fornerii Antecessoris Aurel. Notae in lib. Variar. His de novo accesserunt Francisci Modii Argumenta seu summaria singulis epistolis praefixa. Perpetuae ad marginem notae, ac interpretations vice variae lectiones. Petri Brossei in Cassiodorum Animadversiones. Gnomologia Cassiodorana. Cum indice locupletissimo. Lyon (Lugdunum), Apud Iacobum Chouët 1595. Colophon at the end: Ex typogr. Ant. Candidi Lugdun.) 8vo. (XL, last 2 pages blank),719,(1 blank); 417;(55) p. Overlapping vellum. 18.5 cm (Ref: GLN 3782; Schweiger 2,64; Baudrier t. 12 p. 486; Graesse 2,63) (Details: 6 thongs laced through joints, woodcut ornament on the title) (Condition: Vellum very slightly spotted. Old owner's inscription on the front flyleaf erased with ink. Right lower corner of the front flyleaf, once cut off, repaired) (Note: The texts in this book concern the Ostrogoths, a Germanic people which during the period of the Great Migration swept through Europe and finally established themselves in Italy after 490 under the rule of their king Theodoric the Great. Theodoric, well versed in Roman politics, sought to revive Roman culture, and organized his kingdom with the help of Roman administration. One of the most important Romans who helped this Germanic king was the Roman aristocrate and senator in 514, Flavius Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus, ca. 490 - ca. 590. He tried to act as a mediator in Roman-Ostrogoth politics. He was taken prisoner by the Byzantine general Belisarius after the defeat of the Ostrogoths and brought to Byzantium. Here he urged the emperor Justinian to reconquer Italy. In 552 Cassiodorus returned to Italy and founded there the monastery of Vivarium. In 519 Cassiodorus had written the Chronica a summary of Roman history up to Theodoric in the context of human history since Adam. Cassiodorus' History of the Goths in 12 books only survives in an abstract of the Iordanes in the first book of his Getica. It is the only surviving work which deals with the early history of the Goths and the Huns. Cassiodorus' approach is Goths friendly. His most important work is his Variae (epistulae), compiled around 538 in 12 books. It is a collection of the most important edicts and letters, documents and charters which he produced for Theodoric and his successors. The collection is a very important source for our knowledge of late antique Roman administration and politics. § Magnus Felix Ennodius, 473-521, was a Gallic-Roman aristocrate, poet and rhetorician who was appointed bishop of Pavia (Ticinum) in 514. He wrote a Panegyric for Theodoric to thank him for his religious tolerance and his support of Pope Summachus. The editor of the works mentioned was the French scholar Pierre de (la) Brosse(s), or Petrus Brosseus. He was a jurist, and is the author of extensive commentaries on the law books of Justinian, including an edition of the Institutiones in 1605. Brosseus reproduces here the edition of the Variae which was annotated and emendated by another French jurist, Guillaume Fournier, or Gulielmus Fornerius, professor of civil right at the University of Orléans in 1588. That edition was previously published in Paris in 1583. § The Flemish wandering scholar Franciscus Modius was born in 1556. He produced several juridic works and editions. His short argumenta to the Variae seem to have been handy) (Provenance: On the front pastedown a small label of GS Ellius, Buchhandlung u. Antiquariat, Berlin W.S. Mohrenstrasse 52, Am Untergrundbahnhof Friedrich-Stadt-Mohrenstrasse; name on front flyleaf is made illegible) (Collation: *-2*8, 3*4 (leaf 3*4 blank); a-2y8 A-2F8 2G4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120515 Euro 575,00
CASSIODORUS. Hystoria Tripertita. Habes candidissime lector Hystoriam Tripertitam Cassiodori Senatoris viri Dei de regimine Ecclesie primitive; que antea quamplurimis scatebat erroribus adamussim emendatam, pristineque integritati restitutam. (Lyon, Jacques Giunta), 1526. 8vo. (126 unnumbered leaves). Modern half vellum. 18.5 cm (Ref: Baudrier VI,122; not in Schweiger, Brunet, Graesse, or Ebert) (Details: Woodcut borders on title. Title in red & black. Printer's device of Jacques Giunta, and a red Florentine 'fleur de lis' on the title. Numerous woodcut initials. The text is printed in 2 columns) (Condition: Paper slightly browning. Lower margin very slightly waterstained. Occasional old ink underlinings and annotations) (Note: The 'Historia tripartita', was edited by Magnus Aurelius Cassiodorus (490-590), the celebrated founder of the 'Monasterium Vivariense' in Calabria, and one of the most important authors of his time. He was descended from a senatorial family, and, as the minister of King Theodoric, enjoyed the highest honours of the gothic kingdom of Italy. After retiring he devoted his talents to the spiritual improvement of the monks of Vivarium. In his 'Institutiones', which were written to guide the study of his monks, Cassidorus recommended to them the reading of the latin translation of the Church History (Historia Ecclesiastica) of the Greek bishop Eusebius of Caesarea, which covered the history of the Christian church up to 324, and of its continuations written by Socrates, Sozomenus and Theodoretus. (Institiones I,17,1) The first work was already translated by one Tyrannius Rufinus in 401 A.D. As there was no Latin translation available of the three continuations, Cassiodurus asked one Epiphanius to produce one. (quos a viro disertissimo Epiphanio in uno corpore duodecim libris fecimus Deo auxiliante transferri') (Idem, ibidem) This Epiphanius Scholasticus was an Italian who was well acquainted with the Greek language and the church history of the East. He might have been a chaplain, an amanuensis, or a general assistant of Cassiodorus. § The nature of the 'Historia Tripertita' is also fully explained in the preface of Cassiodorus; it is a church history in 12 books, containing excerpts from the works of the three Greek church historians, Theodoretus (in the 'praefatio' called Theodoricus), Socrates and Sozomenus, in Latin translation, and in one volume, 'in unum collecte'. (Page 1 recto) Cassiodorus tells the reader in the 'praefatio' that Epiphanius Scholasticus translated the text of the 'Hystoria', and adds that he himself corrected faults of style, and diction, and arranged the three narratives into one continuous history. ('quos nos per Epiphanium Scholasticum latino condentes eloquio, necessarium duximus eorum dicta deflorata in unius stili tractum, domino iuvante, perducere, et de tribus auctoribus unam facere dictionem') Epiphanius' translation was produced 'domino prestante', with the help of God. The NP says that Epiphanius translated 'im Auftrag des Cassiodorus griechische Werke ins Lateinischen, als wichtigste die Historia tripartita' (NP 3,1153). Epiphanius helped his superior with the translation of Greek manuscripts into Latin, to urge the clergy, who could not read Greek any longer, to classical and sacred studies. The manual served the clergy throughout the Middle Ages well. Posterity can be harsh: 'The Historia Tripartita is a hasty composition, teeming with errors and contradictions, but nevertheless much used throughout the Middle Ages as a manual of history'. (Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. Cassiodorus). The text was first published in 1472. Giunta published a reissue in 1534) (Collation: A-Q8 (leaf Q6 verso, leaves Q7 & Q8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130038 Euro 1200,00
CEBES. KEBÊTOS THÊBAIOU PINAX. Cebes, des Thebaners Gemählde, mit erklärenden Anmerkungen und einem vollständigen Wortregister. Für Schulen bearbeitet von Johann David Büchling. Meissen, Bey Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Erbstein, 1796. 8vo. 176 p. Contemporary boards 18 cm (Ref: VD18 11454512; Hoffmann 1,443; not in Graesse or Ebert) (Details: Schoolbook, with an introduction of 34 p. At the end an index verborum of 54 p. Greek text on the upper half of the page, German notes on the lower half) (Condition: Cover worn at the extremities. Paper slightly yellowing. Two ownership inscriptions on the front endpapers) (Note: The dialogue Cebetis tabula dates from the first century A.D., it was attributed to the philosopher Cebes, a student of the Athenian Socrates. In it an ancient temple painting, which caught the attention of two visitors, is explained by an old man. It is an allegorical picture on which the dangers and temptations of human life are symbolically represented. It shows that happiness can only be reached by a proper education and a virtuous life. This once popular ethical work is now almost forgotten. But in the 16th, 17th and 18th century it was widely read, especially by clerics and schoolboys. This edition of Büchling is meant for beginners, is told in the introduction. Experience in Privatuntericht and in the classroom has learned Büchling the usefulness of this text. § The German schoolmaster Johann David Büchling, 1762-1811, was born in Halle. He produced school editions of a great number of Roman and Greek school authors, e.g. Sallustius, Aesopus, Palaephatus, Cicero, Anacreon, Theophrastus, and Nepos) (Provenance: On the front pastedown 'Bibl. Scholae Cathedr. Gustrov acc. 1812'. Güstrow is a small city in Mecklenburg Vorpommern. The Cathedral School (Domschule) had a large library which was dispersed after WW II. The building, from 1575, still exists. On the flyleaf, difficult to read: 'Wilhelm .... Ludewig (?) Land, Grübenhagen den 26ten Märtz, 1797') (Collation: A-L8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120525 Euro 90,00
CEBES. Levens-tafereel van Cebes den Thebaner, uit het Grieks ondigt in Neêrlands Digtmaat overgezet, met breedvoerige zinverklaarende en taal- en oudheid-kundige uitleggingen; Als ook nog met zeven byzondere bygevoegde verhandelingen verrykt: Met een nieuwe afbeeldinge van Lysis Tafereel en andere kopere plaaten verciert door Gerhardus Outhof, predikant en rector te Kampen. Amsterdam, By Pieter de Coup, 1727. 8vo. (XVI),40;259,(3),(2 blank);270 p., frontispiece, 2 fold. plates, 5 fullpage engravings. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 24,8; OiN 138) (Details: 6 thongs laced through cover; frontispiece: the interior of a temple, in the foreground 4 philosophers, in the background an old man explains a big picture to an audience of 2, swinging his stick as a pointer. Title in red and black; an engraved printer's mark on the title, depicting Athena, Hermes and Fama, motto: 'vita sine litteris mors est'. The 5 fullpage engravings show Greek landscapes with in the upperpart the portrait of a famous philosopher in a kind of medallion; the first folding engraving depicts the wellknown scene of the 'Cebetis Tabula': a garden with 2 concentric walls filled with allegorical figures; In the foreground an old man (Genius) explaining to those entering life the dangers and temptations they may encounter on their path. At the entrance in the wall sits Seductio (Temptation), offering a youth a drink from a goblet. In the background is a high hill with a temple on top, a destination which can be reached by only a few. The other folding plate shows 4 kinds of Sphinxes) (Condition: Vellum soiled; bookplate pasted on the verso of the front flyleaf. A nice copy) (Note: The dialogue 'Cebetis tabula' dates from the first century A.D., it was attributed to the philosopher Cebes, a student of the Athenian Socrates. In it an ancient temple painting, which caught the attention of 2 visitors, is explained by an old man. It is an allegorical picture on which the dangers and temptations of human life are symbolically represented. It shows that happiness can only be reached by proper education and a virtuous life. This once popular ethical work is now almost forgotten. But in the 16th, 17th and 18th century it was widely read, e.g. by clergymen and preachers, people like the Dutch cleric Gerardus Outhof, 1673-1733. In the preface he explains that he used to choose this text to learn his students Greek and Virtues at the same time. He is convinced that this picture was designed by the mythical philosopher Pythagoras, and presented to the temple by Lysis, one of his pupils. (p. 10) Outhof was a pedantic scholar who knew his Greek, and so buried his verse translation of the 'Tabula' under a load of priggish book-learning. At the end he added 7 very learned lectures on the 'Tabula Cebetis'. The first 2 on the Sphinx, a figure which the old man in the dialogue uses to demonstrate what will be the consequences of Foolishness. The others are on the bad influence which fortune and wealth have, and on the immortality of the soul, the existence of Hell, and the teachings of the Pythagoreans. (On Outhof, Van der Aa, 14, p. 282-283)) (Provenance: the beautiful bookplate was etched by Berkom in 1951 for 'Dr. G.J. Wiegersma'. It depicts the village of Lith seen from the other side of the Meuse. The motto on the bookplate: 'Obvius ire paro'. On the flyleaf at the end of the book Wiegersma has written with ballpoint 'Dr. G.J. Wiegersma, Breda, .... 9.12.69, 10-07 MM. On the internet we found an ophthalmologist G.J. Wiegersma, once living in Breda. Gerrit (Gerard) Wiegersma published some articles in the sixties of the 20th century (See Wikipedia s.v. 'Wiegersma', a family of artists and medicins. His dates according to genealogieonline.nl are 1899-1973) (Collation: pi1 (frontispiece), *-3*8, 4*4; A-P8, R4 (leaf R4 blank); A-R8 (leaf R8 blank); plates before 12, 14, 105 and 226 of the first part, and page 1 of the preface of part 1; folding plate before p. 1 of part. 1 and before page 1 of part 2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130425 Euro 375,00
CENSORINUS. Censorinus De die natali. Henric. Lindenbrogius recensuit, et notis, iterata hac editione passim adauctis, illustravit. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Ioannis Maire, 1642. 8vo. (XVI),250,(38 index) p., text illustrations,1 plate. Rebacked full calf. 15.5 cm (Ref: Breugelmans p. 490, 1642:3; Schweiger 2,101; Graesse 2,101; Ebert 3909) (Details: Backstrip skillfully restored in antique style. Backstrip ruled gilt and with 4 raised bands, and with a red shield in the second compartment. Woodcut printer's mark on the title. Woodcut printer's mark on title depicting a farmer stamping a shovel into the ground, above the head of the farmer 'fac et spera'. Some woodcut illustrations. The plate bears an astrological diagram) (Condition: Both boards scuffed and scratched. Some spots on the front board superficially damaged by insects. Corners bumped and abraded. Both pastedowns partly loose, front flyleaf partly loose. Small strip of paper sewn into the gutter before the title to strengthen the front joint. Title dustsoiled. Ownership entry on the title and on the front pastedown; some pencil) (Note: According to J.J. Scaliger a 'liber aureolus', a 'Golden Book'. The Roman grammarian Censorinus lived in first half of the third century A.D. Of him survives 'De die natali, dedicated to his 'patronus' Q. Caerellius on his birthday in A.D. 238. The first part deals with the genetic and astrologic aspects of of the date of birth, and furthermore numerical mysticism. The second with time and divisions. Its sources are Varro, Suetonius (De anno Romanorum), and several Greek authorities on procreation, embryology, botany and music. This work is valuable for its otherwise lost sources. The editio princeps was published in 1497 in Bologna. The German scholar Heinrich Lindenbrog, 1570-1642, published in 1614 in Hamburg his first edition of Censorinus. A revised and augmented second edition was published in Leiden in 1642. A third again augmented edition appeard in Cambridge in 1695, another was edited by Sigbert Havercamp in 1743 in Leiden 1743.He studied Classics in Leiden under J.J. Scaliger. Classicists are humans too. After his studies he made a tour which brought him and his friend Johannes van Wouweren to France, to the monastery of St. Victor. It was told, that they stole there with the help of a monk 16 manuscripts. They became known as 'Les Corsaires de Hamburg'. He was arrested, but came free with the help of the French scholar French Pierre Dupuy (Puteanus), 1582-1651, the son of the humanist and famous bibliophile Claude Dupuy, who was a great collector of manuscripts. Little is known of the rest of his life. From 1610 onward till his death, Lindenbrog was the librarian of the Duke Johann Adolf von Holstein, who had assembled in Gottorp a great collection of books. He made his name as a philologist with this Censorinus edition, and with a correct edition of the Policraticus, sive de nugis Curialium, of the 12th century English theologian John of Salisbury, which was published in Leiden in 1595. (ADB 18,693)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in ink: 'F.C. Holland, BaR (?), Sept. 11 1936'. On the title in faint ink: 'Ex libris Joan. Leith Ross, 1814'. Loosely inserted also a armorial engraved bookplate of 'John Leith Ross of Arnage & Bourtie'. On a banner beneath the shield the motto 'Crux Christi nostra salus'. Above the shield 3 other motto's in small type: 'Agnoscar eventu', 'Omnia a Deo' and 'Trustie to the end'. John Leith-Ross, son of Alexander Leith 2nd of Freefield and his second wife Martha Ross was born in 1777 and died in 1839. He married Elizabeth Young in 1807, daughter of William Young and Mary Anderson, 4th of Arnage. John Leith Ross of Arnage was an antiquary and classical scholar of no mean attainments, was bom, on 29th September 1777, at his father's seat of Freetield, in the parish of Rayne, Aberdeenshire; having been the only surviving issue of the marriage between Alexander Leith of Freefield and Glenkindy and his second wife, Martha, daughter of John Ross of Arnage, in Buchan. Within the parish church of Ellon a marble tablet is thus inscribed : "John Leith-Ross of Arnage, died 15 May 1839, aged 63: Elizabeth Young, his spouse, co-heiress of Bourtie, died 9 June, 1852, aged 70: their third son William Ross, M.D., died 28 Sep. 1834, aged 22 ; George, their fourth son, and Frederick, their grandson, died in childhood." Mr. Ross, merchant in Aberdeen, acquired the estate of Arnage about the close of the seventeenth century'. (See http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=heedrapper&id=I3154) (Collation: (?)8, A-S8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152311 Euro 220,00
CHRONICON PASCHALE. PASCHALION, seu Chronicon Paschale a mundo condito ad Heraclii Imperatoris annum vicesimum. Opus hactenus Fastorum Siculorum nomine laudatum, deinde Chronicae Temporum Epitomes, ac denique Chronici Alexandrini lemmate vulgatum; nunc tandem auctius et emendatius prodit cum nova latina versione & notis chronicis ac historicis, cura et studio Caroli Du Fresne, D. Du Cange. Parisiis, e Typographia Regia, 1688. Folio. (20),52,614,(26) p. Early 19th century boards. 46.5 x 32 cm (Ref: Neue Pauly 2,1168; LMA 2,1953/4 both s.v. Chronicon Paschale; Brunet I,1435 & 1859; Ebert 3221,21) (Details: Dark blue spine with a red letterpiece and gilt fillets; wide uncut margins, thick paper; engraved printer's device of the Typographia Regia on the title; 4 beautiful engraved headpieces, 2 large initials, 2 engravings in the text; Greek text and Latin translation juxtaposed) (Condition: Cover worn, esp. at extremities; corners bumped; paper on covers grazed at places; letterpiece on the back damaged; some gatherings slightly browning) (Note: The Chronicon Paschale was compiled between 631 and 641 by a clergyman in the time of the emperor Herakleitos. Because the compiler is very interested in establishing the date of Eastern, Du Cange called it the Chronicon Paschale. The chronology starts with Adam, and ends in 628, where the manuscript breaks off. From 602 onward the compiler was eyewitness of the important events of his days. The historical data and the use of documents, records and charters make this book one of the most important sources of Greek christian chronology. Brunet mentiones that this work was number 4 of the series Corpus historiae byzantinae scriptores. Ebert however says that this is number 21 of the series. C. du Fresne du Cange, 1610-1688, best known for his large glossary on Medieval Latin, 'Glossarium ad scriptores Mediae & Infimae Latinitatis', was one of the greatest lexicographers of France, and his work in this field still remains unsurpassed. His work on byzantine history is best illustrated by his Historia Byzantina of 1680, and his edition of Ville-Hardouin's History of the Latin conquest of Constantinople, of 1657) (Provenance: Ex libris en codicibus Episcopi Brugensis XIX, 1863) (Collation: *6 (*1 blank) 2*4, â4 ê4 î4 ô4 û4, 2â4 2ê2, A - 4L4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 083760 Euro 900,00
CHRYSOSTOMUS,JOHANNES. Dialogus D. Ioannis Chrysostomi de Episcopatu & Sacerdotio, Germano Brixio Antissiodorensi interprete. Marburg (Marpurgi), Apud Eucharium Cervicornum, 1537, mense Ianuario.. Small 8vo. 207,(1) p. 19th century full calf 16.5 cm (Ref: VD16 J461; not in Hoffmann, Ebert, Graesse and Brunet) (Details: Printer's device on the title, depicting a thornbush from which emerges a lily, the motto above it reads: 'Sicut lilium inter spinas', 'as the lily among thorns', which is the first half of the second verse of the second Song of Songs, or Song of Salomon. Woodcut coat of the arms of Hessen on the verso of the title and on the verso of the last leaf; Marburg, the city where this book was printed, lies in Hessen. 19th century blind ruled binding; edges of the bookblock dyed red. Latin translation of 'De sacerdotio' only) (Condition: Name once cut from the blank upper margin of the title, the lacuna is repaired by a strip of paper. Some old ink underlinings and annotations. Small hole at the outer margin of the last leaf repaired with paper, not affecting any text or the engraving) (Note: This dialogue is one of the most read and most printed works of the Church Father Johannes Chrysostomus, ca. 345-407. It was written 10 years after his ordination to bishop in 373. The partner in this dialogue is Chrysostomus' friend Basilius Magnus. The discussion is about the episcopate and priesthood. The Latin translation is by the French humanist Germanus Brixius (Germain de Brie), 1490-1538, pupil of the Greek scholar J. Lascaris, and later secretary to the bishop of Albi. He was also secretary of Queen Anne, second wife of Henry VIII. He is best known for the literary argument he had with Thomas More. They exchanged quarrelsome epigrams. The quarrel was ended by Erasmus, friend of both humanists. It was first published in Paris in 1526. On the title of this edition is added that Brixius was a 'Canonicus Parisiensis'. The printer Eucharius Hirtzhorn (Cervicornus) worked in Cologne since 1517 and in Marburg from 1535 until 1538. He printed scholarly editions of Greek and Latin classics. He is well known for the beauty and the clarity of his types and the quality of his paper) (See for Hirtzhorn: Rudolf Schmidt: Deutsche Buchhändler. Deutsche Buchdrucker, 1905)) (Collation: A - N-8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120215 Euro 550,00
CICERO. Rhetoricorum M. Tullii Ciceronis ad C.Herennium libri IIII. In eorundem obscura & difficilia loca annotationes perutiles et necessariae, a Gyberto Longolio conscriptae. Eiusdem M. Tulli Ciceronis de inventione rhetorica libri II. Cum M. Fabii Victorini rhetoris scholastici & preceptoris D. Hieronymi commentariis, diligenter per Longolium castigatis & revisis. Cum indice luculento. (Bound with:) Dialectica Ioannis Caesarii, per quaestiones, in compedium redacta, autore Chasparo Rodolphi. Adcessit in principio per eundem Prooemion, continens totius dialectici negotii summam ac usum. Adiecta est ad calcem huius Dialecticae institutionis, Iohannis Murmelii in Praedicamenta Aristotelis isagoge, oppidoquam utilis huius disciplinae studiosis. Ad 1: Cologne (Coloniae), Ioannes Gymnicus excudebat, 1535. Ad 2: Leipzig (Lipsiae), Per Nicolaum Fabrum, 1538. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: 550,(8 index),(2 blank) & (143 non numbered)(1 blank) p. Contemporary blind tooled pigskin 16 cm (Ref: Ad 1: VD16 C 3872; Schweiger 2,115; not in Brunet, Ebert & Graesse. Ad 2: VD16 C 109) (Details: Pigskin blind tooled with triple fillet borders and floral elements. In the center of the boards 2 lozenges filled with a lion on his hind legs. Back with 3 raised bands; woodcut initials) (Condition: Pigskin age-toned and somewhat soiled; some wear to the extremes; wee hole in the upper board; all 4 ties gone; old ownership entries on the front flyleaf and the title; on the title also a small oval library stamp. Pinpoint wormhole in the right upper corner of the first leaf, and the lower corner of the first 4 leaves. The first initials has been rubricated. Occasionally small old ink underlinings and marginal notes. Some faint damp stains on the blank lower margin of the last 7 gatherings) (Note: Ad 1: 'The history of Latin schooling in the Middle Ages and Renaissance is, to a large extent, the history of these two texts and the tricks that students learned'. (See below) The 'Rhetorica ad Herennium' is the oldest Latin manual of the art of rhetoric preserved in its entirety. It was written ca. 68 B.C., and was in late antiquity and in the Middle Ages ascribed to Cicero. The first to doubt the authorship of Cicero was the Italian humanist Lorenzo Valla, and in 1491 it was demonstrated by the Venetian humanist Raphael Regius that the treatise was not written by Cicero. The treatise reflects Hellenistic rhetorical teaching. 'Our author however, gives us a Greek art in Latin dress, combining a Roman spirit with Greek doctrine. It is a technical manual, systematic and formal in arragement; its exposition is bald, but in greatest part clear and precise'. (Loeb edition, ed. Caplan, p. VII) The first 2 books deal with 'invention' (the choice and arrangement of subject-matter) in judicial causes. Book 3 discusses 'invention' in deliberative and epideictic speeches, delivery of a speech, memory and style. Book 4 contains the oldest systematic treatment of style in Latin, and the oldest formal study in Latin of figures of speech. The question of authorship has never been settled to the satisfaction of all scholars. Nowadays it is ascribed to an 'auctor incertus', or the 'Auctor ad Herennium'. The 2 books of 'De inventione' in this collection are indeed the work of Cicero, i.e. of Cicero's schooldays. In a much later work, 'De Oratore', Cicero himself tells that this work was an unfinished, and a rough performance, which got abroad from his note-books. It is believed that young Cicero's 'De Inventione' and the 'Auctor ad Herennium' used the same Latin manual as source. The 'Rhetorica ad Herennium' was already combined with the Ciceronian 'De Inventione' in medieval manuscripts. In the Middle Ages these 2 books became central textbooks for rhetoric. In the 12th century the 'Ad Herennium' was even called, because of its position in the many manuscripts after 'De Inventione' , the 'Rhetorica secunda'. 'Reproduced hundreds of times they also became the objects of numerous commentaries. (...) The history of Latin schooling in the Middle Ages and Renaissance is, to a large extant, the history of these texts and the tricks that teachers made them perform'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambridge Mass., 2010, p. 195). Both texts were edited with commentary by the Dutch scholar Gisbert or Gybertus Longolius,born 1507, in Dutch Gijsbert van Langerack. After his rectorship of the Athenaeum in the Dutch city of Deventer he went to Cologne, where he lectured the last 6 years of his short life on Latin and Greek, together with Johannes Caesarius, at the local university till his death in 1543. (See for Caesararius the second work in this convolute) Longolius published in Cologne texts with commentary of Plautus, Philostratus, Ovid, Plutarch and Cicero, and a Greek-Latin lexicon. (Van der Aa, 11,596) Ad 2: The second work in this convolute, a manual on logic and rhetoric, was probably not chosen haphazardly. As we have seen above, the author of the 'Dialectica' Johannes Caesarius, Johann Kayser, ca. 1468-1550, was a colleague of Longolius in Cologne. Both text were perhaps combined by a student of both. Caesarius was in his time considered to be an apostle of Greek in Westphalia and the Lower Rhine Valley. His importance lies in his paedagogic qualities. He produced widely used manuals of grammar, dialectics, and rhetoric. He wrote a 'Compendiaria artis grammaticae institutio', Cologne 1525, 'Dialectica in X tractatus digesta', Cologne 1529, 'Rhetorica in VII libros sive tractatus digesta', Paris 1534, 'Horatii Epistolae', Cologne 1523, 'C. Plinii secundi Naturalis Hist. Opus', Cologne 1524, 'Diomedes grammaticus, Opera', Cologne 1536; Boethius's, 'De consolatione philosophiae', Cologne 1517. Caesarius's 'Dialectica' was a tremendous success. The treatise was reissued, revised and reprinted many times) (Provenance: On the front pastedown a small stamp: 'Zentralbibliothek Kapuziner Kloster 6210 Sursee LU'. This stamp is repeated on the verso of the front flyleaf. On the recto of the front flyleaf near the upper edge: 'Sum Joannis B?rchardi a Paij.., anno 1563'. In the same hand: 'Nullum est prius animal quam mulier'. On the front pastedown this hand has also written the price: 'emptus Friburgi Brisgoie 3 solidis'. The name probably is Barchard / Barchardus. Burchard seems more probable, but the second letter seems more like an 'a'. The mentioning of Freiburg seems to place him in the Rhine valley. On the front flyleaf has been written between 3 crosses in a different hand: '(illegible name or perhaps 'Gottesbund') dein ewig Hiero: Betz, 1539'. On the title an erased ownership entry: 'Sum Hieronymi Betzii, Emptus Friburgi Brisgoiae .... 1538 mense ...'. Betz bought this book in Freiburg in 1538, and donated it in the next year to ??'. On the title written along the right edge: 'Loci Cappucinorum Grauenfeld'. On the title also a faint oval stamp: 'Bibliothecae F.F. Capuc. Welae') (Collation: Ad 1: A-Z8, Aa-Mm8 (leaf Mm8 blank). Ad 2: A-I8 (leaf I8 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152312 Euro 1250,00
CICERO. M. Tullii Ciceronis De Natura Deorum libri tres. Cum notis integris Aulli Manucii, Petri Victorii, Joachimi Camerarii, Dionys. Lambini, Fulv. Ursini, & Joannis Walkeri. Recensuit, suisque animadversionibus illustravit ac emaculavit Joannes Davisius Coll. Regin. Cantab. Praeses. Editio tertia emendatior et auctior. Cambridge (Cantabrigiae), Typis Academicis. Sumptibus C. Crownfield celeberrimae Academiae Typographi, J. Crownfield & N. Prevost, Bibliopolas Londonienses, 1733. 8vo. (VIII),434,(2 advertisement) p. Calf 20 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,179; Dibdin 1,457; Moss 1,342; Fabricius/Ernesti 1,185) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands; good quality paper; Latin text on upper half of the page, the commentary in 2 columns on the lower part) (Condition: Cover scuffed; back rubbed; corners slightly bumped; bookplate on front pastedown; 2 ownership entries on front flyleaf; a few old ink annotations) (Note: The dialogue De Natura Deorum of the Roman orator and politician Marcus Tullius Cicero, 106-43 B.C., begins with a sketch of the history of the subject, the nature of the gods. In 3 books Cicero discusses the Epicurean, Academic and Stoic view on the matter. The dialogue contains interesting speculations of Greek philosophers now lost to us. The English scholar Sir John Davies, or Joannes Davisius, 1679-1732, the producer of this edition, which was first published in 1718, was once considered to be one of the best commentators on Cicero. He studied at Queens College, of which he was elected fellow, and subsequently became Rector, or Praeses in 1717. He chiefly devoted his attention to the philosophical works of Cicero. His editions show great learning and knowledge of the history of and the systems of ancient philosophy. Davies also produced editions of Maximus Tyrus, Caesar, Minucius Felix and Lactantius. He was a friend and ally of Richard Bentley, Master of Trinity College. It is to this genius that he dedicates his book. Monk, the biographer of Bentley, says that his devotion came little short of idolatry. (Monk, the Life of Richard Bentley, London 1833, vol. 2, p. 115/6). Moss does Davies certainly wrong with his judgement that this edition is a kind of Variorum edition; The kind of edition which offers the 'textus receptus' accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. On the contrary, Davies consulted new manuscripts, with the help, among others, of Richard Bentley. Davies proudly states in his praefatio that 'nam, quod praefiscine dictum sit, aut MSStorum aut ingenii subsidio, hunc Ciceronis foetum pluribus liberavi vitiis, quam omnes omnino, qui praeiverant, interpretes'. He also used the 'animadversiones' which were sent to him by the Dutch classicist Johannes Clericus. At the end of the book, after the index auctorum, we find 29 pages filled with emendations of the Cambridge classical scholar John Walker, 1692(?)-1741, who was a coadjutor of the same Richard Bentley. The young man's firstfruits are these emendations on Cicero's De Natura Deorum. They are considered to be bold and ingenious, after the manner of Bentley, and they show a wide range of reading. Afterwards Walker helped Bentley collating manuscripts for a proposed Graeco-Latin edition of the New Testament, a project which was never completed) (Provenance: The provenance seems to be English. The bookplate of one 'Robert Edward Way', decorates the front pastedown: it shows a moonlit knight sitting at the border of a lake. He leans on his shield with the coat of arms of the family Way. On the flyleaf first: 'Jacobus Angier, 1743', then: 'Henry Marsham, October 14th 1806') (Collation: *8, A-2D8, 2E2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130437 Euro 175,00
CICERO. M.T. Ciceronis Epistolae ad Familiares. Oder Ciceronis Briefe, die er an unterschiedene gute Freunde geschrieben, zu mehrern Nutzen der studierenden Jugend mit Deutschen Anmerkungen also erläutert, dass 1) die schweresten Constructiones erleichtert, 2) die besten Redens-Arten nach der reinen Deutschen Mund-Art übersetzet, 3) die historischen Umstände angezeiget, und 4) die Alterthümer kürzlich erkläret werden. Nebst unterschiedenen nöthigen und nützlichen Lateinischen und Deutschen Real- und Verbal-Registern. Neue verbesserte Auflage. Nürnberg, Verlegts Joh. Paul Krauss, Buchhändler in Wienn, 1761. 8vo. (XVI including frontispiece),740,(124 index) p. Calf 18 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,163; not yet in VD18) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands, and divided with gilt dentelles; red gilt shield in second compartment; engraved frontispiece depicting a seated Cicero among his friends; title in red and black; every letter begins with a short introduction in German. After the Latin text of each 'epistula' follow notes and commentary in German) (Condition: Cover scuffed, especially at the extremes; ownership entry on the title; partly browning paper) (Note: This edition of the 'Epistulae Familiares' of Cicero was first published in Halle by Renger in 1720. It was produced by the German schoolman Leonhard Christoph Rühl, of whom next to nothing is known. He doesnot figure in ADB, or in the 4th volume of 1751 of Jöcher. He has a short lemma in Zedler's 'Grosse vollständiges Universal-Lexicon aller Wissenschaften und Künste' (col. 1753/53 of volume 23, 1742), where we are told that he is a 'der Philosophie Magister, wie auch Conrector in Aschersleben'. Zedler mentions also a number of titles. In Worldcat a number of editions of classics can be found under his name, an edition of the fables of Phaedrus (1719), the Cebetis Tabula (1727), the Breviarum of Eutropius (1724), the Catonis Disticha (1736), the Germania of Tacitus (1720). All of them have notes in German, and are meant for German schoolboys, to improve their Latin and German. This edition of the 'Epistolae Familiares' was a great success. We found editions of 1722, 1724, 1726, 1729, 1731, 1736, 1745, 1750, 1757, 1759, 1760, 1776 and 1777. There may be more. From 1736 onward they were published anonymously by the Viennese publisher Krauss. In this edition of 1761 a 'privilegium Caesareum' dated 1746, is reprinted after the title page, which continues the privilege of Krauss, 'bibliopola Viennensis', for another 10 years. Krauss was the only one who was allowed to publish this book for the next ten years within the borders of the 'Heiliges Römische Reich' (intra Sacri Romani Imperii fines). (*2 recto) The preface opens with the statement that the 'Epistolae Familiares' of Cicero are suited for beginners, because the Latin is easy, and they are an excellent introduction to later authors. 'Denn in selbigen ist das Latein für Anfänger am leichtesten, und sie können auch daraus nach gerade von den Römischen Antiquitäten so viel Nachricht bekommen, dass sie in andern Autoribus desto leichter avanciren können'. (*3 recto) The preface consists for the greater part of a short biography of Cicero. At the end (*8 recto) we learn that the Latin text of this edition was printed after the earlier edition of Cellarius. And: 'Die Anmerkungen gehen sowohl auf die Latinität, als Antiquitäten, welche, so viel als möglich gewesen, kurz und deutlich gefasset worden') (Provenance: In ink written on the title: 'Procuravit Fr. Fulgentius Schus..?, ....? 1 R. 30x. In the lower margin 'Rudolphi Minazit..?) (Collation: pi1, *8 (minus leaf *8); A-3H8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151900 Euro 95,00
CICERO. La république de Cicéron, d'après le texte inédit, récemment découvert et commenté par M. MAI, avec une traduction française, un discours préliminaire, et des dissertations historiques, par M. VILLEMAIN. Paris, L.-G. Michaud, 1823. 8vo. 2 volumes: (VI, including a plate),64,395; (VI, including a folding plate),386,(16, stock list of the publisher Michaud) p. Calf 20.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 1,210; Graesse 2,177; cf. Dibdin 1,463/64; Brunet 2,56) (Details: Nice binding. Back gilt and with a red and a black morocco shield. Boards with elaborately gilt borders. Edges of the boards and the inside dentelles gilt. Endpapers marbled. The plate in volume 1 depicts a group of discussing philosophers; the folding plate shows parts of the palimpsest. Introductions, Latin text with facing French translation, and the notes, 'concinnatae' of Angelo Mai) (Condition: Cover slightly worn at the extremities. Some slight foxing) (Note: 'De re publica' is a dialogue on Roman politics by the Roman politician and author Cicero. The discussion, divided in six books and written between 54 and 51 B.C., occupies three days, is between the younger Scipio Africanus and several other members of his circle. Its subject is not, as in Plato's Republic, justice as illustrated by the perfect state, but the state itself, its best constitution and government. Large parts of the text are missing. From the 4th and the 5th book only minor fragments survived. It is clear that Cicero's ideal republic is an idealized Rome, 'guided by the wisdom and patrotism of her leading men'. (H.J. Rose, 'A handbook of Latin literature', London 1967, p. 185) § The Middle Ages and the Renaissance knew only a part of the 6th book, the 'Somnium Scipionis', or 'Scipio's dream'. This fragment survived because it was the subject of a commentary by the late antique author Macrobius, who wrote 'Commentarii in Somnium Scipionis', or 'Commentary on the Dream of Scipio'. This commentary was one of the most important sources for Platonism in the Latin West during the Middle Ages. Greater parts of this dialogue were discovered on a palimpsest of a manuscript of Augustine in the Vatican Library (Vat Lat 5757) in 1819 by Cardinal Angelo Mai, who published the 'editio princeps' of the remains in Rome in 1822, with some help of the Prussian scholar B.G. Niebuhr. (Sandys 3,80) In the following years a host of editions of the text, commentaries and translations were published, especially in Germany. § Abel-François Villemain, 1790 - 1870, like Cicero a politician and author, was appointed professor of eloquence at the Sorbonne) (Provenance: Small label on both front pastedowns: Mr. Feijens. On the internet we found a jurist Mr. Georgius Lambertus Feijens, who signed up as lawyer/sollicitor at the 'Provinciaal Gerechtshof van Friesland' on 13-02-1816. In 1834 he was President of the Bar Council at the 'Gerechtshof' in Leeuwarden) (Collation: pi2, plate, a-d8, 1-24(8), 25(6); pi2, plate, 1-23(8), 24(2), 25(8) (minus blank leaf 25/8), chi8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130208 Euro 150,00
CICERO. La république de Cicéron, d'après le texte inédit, récemment découvert et commenté par M. Mai, bibliothécaire de Vatican, avec une traduction française, un discours préliminaire, et des dissertations historiques, par M. Villemain de l'Académie Française. Paris, L.-G. Michaud, 1823. 12mo. 3 volumes: (II),148,216; (II),314; (II),292 p. Half calf 17 cm (Ref: cf. Schweiger 2,210; Brunet 2,27; cf. Graesse 2,177) (Details: Bound in the first half of the 19th century by Robert Seton, bookbinder in Edinburgh; his small label pasted on the front pastedown of the first 2 volumes. The Database of Bookbindings of the British Library has 3 bindings of Seton. § Backs gilt and with 5 raised bands; in the second & third compartment a red & brown shield; red edges) (Condition: Bindings worn at the extremities, especially on the joints; head of the spines slightly scuffed. Some foxing) (Note: De re publica is a dialogue on Roman politics by the Roman politician and author Cicero, 106-43 B.C. The six books were written between 54 and 51 B.C. Large parts of the text are missing: especially from the 4th and the 5th book only minor fragments survive. The dialogue was discovered on a palimpsest of the Vatican Library in 1822 by the Cardinal Angelo Mai. He published the editio princeps, with some help of the Prussian scholar B.G. Niebuhr in the same year in Rome. (Sandys 3,80). In the following years a host of editions of the text, commentaries and translations were published, especially in Germany. The Frenchman Abel-François Villemain, 1790 - 1870, was like Cicero a politician and author. He was appointed professor of eloquence at the Sorbonne. Schweiger mentions only the octavo-set in two volumes, and not this duodecimo-set in 3 volumes) (Provenance: On front flyleaf of the first volume: 'Edwin L. Pease, in memoriam 1859'. On the rear pastedown of first volume: 'Bought at The Hague 3 volumes, fl 75,= (1973), S.P. MacLeod (14-11-1921 R'dam) The Hague'. A stamp of S. Macleod on the front flyleaf of third volume) (Collation: pi1, 1-15(12), 16(2); pi1, 1-13(12), 14(1); pi1, 1-12(12), 13(2)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120408 Euro 95,00
CLAUDIANUS. Cl. Claudiani Principum, Heroumque Poetae praegloriosissimi, Quae exstant. Caspar Barthius ope XVII manuscriptorum exemplarium restituit; commentario multo locupletiore, grammatico, critico, philologo, historico, philosophico, politicoque, ita illustravit, ut Auctor pretiosissimus omni aetati, scholasticae, academicae, aulicae, politicaeque, esse debeat ex commendato commendatissimus. Frankfurt (Francofurti), Apud Joannem Naumannum, Bibliop. Hamburgensem, 1650. 4to. (LXXVI, including title & frontispiece),111,(1 blank),1371,(1 blank),(31 corrigenda),(1 blank) p. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: VD17 3:006469N; Schweiger 283; Dibdin: 'Barthius commentary is not only superior to every work which preceded it, but has never been surpassed by any similar production'; Moss 1,376/7: 'rare, and held in considerable estimation'; Brunet 2,88; Ebert 4756; Graesse 2,194; Ernesti, Bibl. Lat. 3,201) (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints. Frontispiece by A. Aubry, depicting the Roman emperor Theodosius the Great and his 'Magister Militum' Stilicho, who guards 2 little boys, Honorius and Arcadius. Title in red and black. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, motto: 'Superata tellus sidera domat'. Woodcut initials and headpieces) (Condition: Vellum soiled, and loosening from fore edge of both boards. Upper board slightly curved. Front endpapers worn. Old inscription and name on the front flyleaf. Name below the frontispiece. Name and small stamp on the title. Stain in the upper margin of frontispiece and title leaf) (Note: 1650 was a lucky year for the last important Roman poet Claudius Claudianus (ca. 400). In the same year as Barthius the Dutch scholar Nicolaas Heinsius published an edition of the works of Claudian. Claudianus 'war ein sehr fruchtbarer, temperamentvoller Dichter und bietet reichen historischen Stoff in rhetorischem Stil'. (Buchwald, Tusculum-Lexikon, 3rd ed. p. 171/2) As 'tribunus et notarius' he acted as court poet for the emperor Theodosius, his general Stilicho, and the emperor's sons Honorius and Arcadius. In 400 he was honoured with a bronze statue on the Forum Trajanum in Rome. His work was widely read in the Middle Ages. The humanists also placed him on the center stage. In the beginning of the 20th century philologist lost interest, but since the rise of interest in late antiquity in the sixties, he is again recognized as one of the great Roman poets. (NP., s.v. Claudianus). Caspar von Barth, or Barthius, 1587-1658, was a child prodigy. He read a lot during his lifetime, but seems to have known little. His specialty seems to have been hoarding material. In his youth, in 1612, he published his first edition of Claudian. He republished it, with many corrections and additions in 1650. The commentary is, says Schweiger, 'überladen'. The very weight of this book, almost 2 kilo's, proves that he is right. For some Barthius was a charlatan, for others a 'divinum ingenium'. Barthius 'war gelehrt, hatte viel gelesen und so auch in seinen Schriften ausgespeichert, aber Ordnung, Klarheit und Schärfe lässt sich vermissen', is the final judgment in ADB. (Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie 2, p. 101/2) This edition shows however enough glimpses of genius to deserve the praise most bibliographers assigned to him) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf the name of Lennart Håkanson, professor of Latin Literature at the Univ. of Uppsala, 1980-1987. § 2 other names seem to point to Denmark. Under the frontispiece in old ink: 'Axelii Julii Iv. F. Nobilis Dani Dno de Wolstorp etc. Anno 1657'. We found on the internet the following provenance, dated 1662, of one 'Axelius Julius Ivari Filius Dus de Wolstorp [?] hujus Libri possessor [?]', in an edition of 'De anulis antiquis' of 1654. This makes: 'Axelii Julii Ivari Filii Nobilis Dani Domino de Wolstorp'. The 'Domino' is awkward. § In faint ink in the right margin of the frontispiece and on the title: 'J. Mundelstrup'. We found the following title, a poem in Latin and Danish, on the internet of one J. Mundelstrup: 'a Augustiss. Friderico Qvarto, Daniæ ... regi, gloriosissimam pacem regnis Ao. 1720 vindicatam gratulabatur'. § A small round stamp on in left lower corner of the title: 'A.St.B.') (Collation: pi2 (frontispiece & title), a6, b-e4 (minus the blank leaf e4), f-i4 (minus leaves i3 & i4); A-O4 (leaf O4 verso blank); A-8L4 (minus leaves 8L3 & 8L4, leaf 8L2 verso blank); 8M-8P4 (leaf 8P4 verso blank)) (Photographs on request) (Heavy book, may require extra shipping costs)
Book number: 130046 Euro 750,00
CLAUDIANUS. Cl. Claudiani Quae exstant. Nic. Heinsius Dan. Fil. recensuit ac notas addidit, post primam editionem altera fere parte nunc auctiores. Accedunt selecta Variorum commentaria, accurante C.S.M.D. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Ex Officina Elzeviriana, 1665. 8vo. (XXVIII),917,(15 index) p. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,283/84; Dibdin 1,471: 'in fact the best Variorum edition'; Moss 1,377: 'a very correct and valuable edition' and 'This is one of the very scarcest of the Variorum editions'; Graesse 2,194; Ebert 4757; Brunet 2,88; Ernesti, Bibl. Lat. 1774, 3,201: 'sed optima est ed. a. 1665'; Willems 1350: 'fort bien imprimé'; Rahir 1400; Berghman 2036; Spoelder, Enkhuizen 1, p. 554) (Details: Prize copy, prize gone. 6 thongs laced through both joints. Gilt coat of arms of Enkhuizen within blind ruled borders on both boards. Engraved title depicting the rape of Proserpina, and the battle of the Giants against the gods. The notes are printed on the lower half of the pages, below the text) (Condition: Vellum varnished, the bad result is a gleaming binding with a few brownish strokes. Gilt fading. 4 thongs on the front joint broken. All 4 ties gone. Small bookplate on the front pastedown. Name on front flyleaf) (Note: This is the second edition of the works of the Roman poet Claudius Claudianus produced by Nicolaas Heinsius, 1620-1681, who was the only son of Daniel Heinsius. It was first published in 1650. Nicolaas never held any academic post. Let us see what Sandys tells about this genius: 'His practice in versification, his wide reading in classical and post-classical Latin, and his knowledge of Greek literature made him an accomplished scholar. As a textual critic he had acquired an extensive knowledge of various readings by his study of MSS'. And: 'In making his selection from the vast mass of variants, he was guided by a fine taste and a sound judgement acquired by long experience'. And: 'His editions of the Latin poets laid the foundation of the textual criticism of those authors, and he has thus obtained the title of 'sopitator poetarum Latinorum.' (Sandys 2,323/327). Heinsius consulted, he says in the praefatio, for his first edition some 28 manuscripts, 'viginti enim & octo fere ad manum fuerunt, ut vides'. Among these were 2 from the University Library of Leiden, and 2 from the Bodleian. Also 2 that were in the possession of the successor of Plantin, the publisher Balthasar Moretus, manuscripts that were originally used for the Plantin edition of Claudian by Pulman. (Antwerp, 1571) Heinsius rebukes Pulman for having neglected one of these, which he calls 'insignis' and 'probus'. Pulman used it sluggishly, 'oscitanter'. Heinsius consulted also 3 manuscripts which the French librarian and collector of manuscripts Alexander Petavius (Petau) had send him, one of the Royal Library, one of his own, and one owned by J.A. de Thou (Thuanus). After his edition of 1650 Heinsius continued to consult during his diplomatic travels through Europe 10 'bis quini' other excellent manuscripts containing texts of Claudian. Heinsius gives in the new praefatio to this second edition, written 14 years after the first edition, 'ante annos hosce plus minus quatuordenos' a dazzling account of the books and manuscripts he consulted for the new edition. We also get a glimpse of the huge network of scholarly friends of which Heisius was a member. This second edition was published, so the title says, by Cornelis Schrevelius, who took his doctoral degree in Paris as a Doctor of Medicine in 1627. Hence C.S.M.D., that is Cornelis Schrevelius Medicus Doctor. He taught classics at the Schola Latina at Leiden, where he had been raised himself. In 1642 he succeeded his father, Theodorus Schrevelius, as the rector (Moderator) of the school. He died in 1664, a few days after having completed this edition of Claudian. He raised at least 11 kids, and fell victim to the plague. (A.M. Coebergh van den Braak, Meer dan zes eeuwen Leids Gymnasium, Leiden, 1988, p. 47/55); includes also his portrait). The involvement of Schrevelius in publishing a new edition of Claudian was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. He did, so the 'typographus' (who must be Daniel Elzevier) tells us in his short address to the reader, all that is necessary for a better understanding of Claudian, producing excerpts from the commentaries and editions of the best scholars) (Provenance: An engraved armorial bookplate on upper pastedown of one 'Joshua Ruddock': a crown, with 3 strawberry leaves on it, and a 'pearl' in the center of the leaves, on top, an eagle with spread wings. On the front flyleaf the name of Lennart Håkanson, professor of Latin Literature at the Univ. of Uppsala, 1980-1987) (Collation: *8, 2*6, A-3M8 3N2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130044 Euro 400,00
CLAUDIANUS. Cl. Claudiani Quae exstant. Varietate lectionis et perpetua adnotatione illustrata a Io. Matthia Gesnero. Accedit index uberrimus. Leipzig (Lipsiae), In officina Fritschia, 1759. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XIV) p., p. 400; (2),401-720; 222 (index),(2 blank). Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 178: 'enthält (...) nützlichen lat. Komm.'; Schweiger 2,184: 'Im wesentlichen ist der Text der Ausg. von Heinsius (1650) wiederhohlt, aber auch dessen spätere Emendationen u. ältere Ausgg. zu Rathe gezogen. Die kurzen Anmerkgg. erläutern trefflich den Sinn, die Sprache u. die Sachen'; Dibdin 1,471/72: 'A work so recommended (...) will not make the student hesitate long about the necessity of procuring it.'; Moss 1,377: 'undoubtedly a very excellent and valuable edition'.; Ebert 4759; Brunet 2,88; Graesse 2,194; Not yet in VD18; Fabricius/Ernesti 3,202) (Details: 2 thoungs laced through the joints; back ruled gilt, and with a black shield in the 'second' and 'fourth compartment'. Endpapers and edges marbled) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and slightly soiled. The edges of the shields on the back damaged. The upper boards are slightly outstanding. Foxed, paper somewhat browning) (Note: The Roman poet Claudius Claudianus, ca. 400 AD, 'war ein sehr fruchtbarer, temperamentvoller Dichter und (he) bietet reichen historischen Stoff in rhetorischem Stil'. (Buchwald, Tusculum-Lexikon, 3rd ed. p. 171/172). As 'tribunus et notarius' he acted as court poet, eulogizing the emperor Theodosius, his general Stilicho, and the emperor's sons Honorius and Arcadius. In 400 he was honoured with a bronze statue on the Forum Trajanum in Rome, and a rich bride selected for him by Stilicho's wife. He is the last representative of the classical tradition of Latin poetry. 'In diction and technique he bears comparison with the best Silver Age work, but his considerable gifts of invective, description and epigram are offsett by a deplorable tendency of over-elaboration. His writings are a useful (...) historical source for his period'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 245) Claudianus died ca. 404. His work was widely read in the Middle Ages. The humanists also placed him on the center stage. In the beginning of the 20th century philologist lost interest, but since the rise of interest in late antiquity in the sixties, he is again recognized as one of the great Roman poets. This edition of Claudian of the German classical scholar Johann Matthias Gesner, 1691-1761, gives evidence of sound scholarship, but, just like his many other editions of ancient authors of Gesner, the edition does never break new ground. It just is a testimony of solid current knowledge. Textual critiscism was not Gesner's strongest point. His notes are excellent and learned, well calculated to illustrate the poet. The edition contains erudite prolegomena, a literary history of Claudianus, variae lectiones, and a useful account of his editions. Gesner earned lasting fame with his epoch-making lexicographic work, especially with his revised edition of the 'Dictionarum, seu Latinae linguae thesaurus' of Robertus Stephanus. (London 1734). Wilamowitz calls Gesner a 'Praeceptor Germaniae', 'denn er hat die Leipziger Thomasschule zu einer Musteranstalt gemacht, (...) und ihm bleibt der Ruhm, das erste philologisches Seminar gegrundet zu haben'. (U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, 'Geschichte der klassichen Philologie', Leipzig/Berlin 1921, p. 42) (Collation: a-c8 (chi1 'addenda emendanda' after leaf a1); A-Z8, Aa-Bb8, chi1 (title second volume), Cc-Zz8, Aaa-Nnn8 (leaf Nnn8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152315 Euro 200,00
COLLECTIO PISAURENSIS, omnium poematum, carminum, fragmentorum latinorum, sive ad christianos, sive ad ethnicos, sive ad certos, sive ad incertos poetas; a prima latinae linguae aetate ad sextum usque christianum seculum & Longobardorum in Italiam adventum pertinens, ab omnium poetarum libris, collectionibus, lapidibus, codicibus exscripta. Pesaro (Pisauri), Ex Amantina Chalcographia, 1766. 4to. 6 vols: XVIII,LII,522; (II),XXXV,480; (II),XXIV,529; (II),LXXIV,514; (II),VIII,388; (II),XII,306 p. H.calf 27 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,1284; Ebert 4932; Brunet 2,134) (Details: Backs with 5 raised bands; floral ornament in compartments on the back; edges dyed red; engraved printer's mark on the first title, depicting a flying Fama, the banner of her trumpet reads: 'Hic meret aera liber Sosiis', taken from the Ars Poetica of Horace, verse 345/46: 'Hic meret aera liber Sosiis, hic et mare transit et longum noto scriptori prorogat aevum'. 'That is the book to make money for the Sosii; this the one to cross the sea and extend to a distant day its author's fame' (Fairglouch, Loeb translation); woodcut initials; printed in 2 columns; 9 folding leaves of vol. 4 are filled with the virtuous 'carmina figurata' of the late antique poet Publilius Optatianus Porphyrius. They are attractively printed, some in red and black, on folding leaves, to display their ingenuous composition. See J. S. Edwards: 'The Carmina of Publilius Optatianus Porphyrius and the Creative Process' online at: 'somegreymatter.com')(Condition: Backs rubbed; head & tail of the backs somewhat chafed; covers slightly scratched; paper partly yellowing, some gathering slightly browning; some pinpoint and unobstrusive wormholes in a limited number of pages of vol. 1 & 4) (Note: The 'Collectio Pisaurensis' is dedicated to the Marquis Carlo Mosca Barzi, 'protagonista della cultura Pesarese del 1700' by Paschalis Amatus (Pasquali Amati), teacher of the illustrious Gymnasium of Pesaro. During their talks in the last few years, Amati tells us, they discussed the need for a new and better edition of a corpus comprising all latin poets. The existing collections, all printed outside Italy, were found to be incomplete and of doubtful quality. Then the Marquis asked young Amati to produce for him a new and better corpus of all Latin poets, (qui Italici fere omnes & nostrates fuissent) which would make Italy proud. Amati gave up his job at the Gymnasium and completed in 2 years this 'Collectio Pisaurensis' in the service of the Marquis who owned also a printing office, an office which was called for this occasion after Amati, the 'Amatina Chalcographia'. Amati disputes next about the faults of the previous collections of Geneva 1611, Lyon 1616 and of London 1713, which were not well organized, not complete, and full of typographical errors, wrong readings and emendations. He then explains how he searched for new material, and how he divided and classified it more logically and chronologically. He consulted important collections edited previously by Henricus en Robertus Stephanus, Scriverius, Scaliger, Almeloveen, Burmannus, Gruterus and many others. Amati had the bright idea to offer the reader for each author also the biographies and bibliographical matter collected by G. Fabricius in his 'Bibliotheca Latina' (1734-1746). For the authors, especially the late antique and christian ones, who were not incorporated in Fabricius' bibliography , Amati printed the bio- and bibliographical data that he found in the best editions of the time. Amati was not only busy in his study editing this corpus, but he also supervised the printing itself. He complains about the tumultuous activity in the printing shop, about the pressure of his printers, and the heat of the printing type. We donot know if the publishing of the 'Collectio' was as profitable for the Marquis as for the Sosii the work of Horace, but it surely extended the fame of the young editor and his noble employer, because the 'Collectio' was far better and far completer that earlier editions. Pasquale Amati, or Amatius, 1726-1797, was a classical scholar, he calls himself 'Litterarum satis expers', but also a jurist. He was professor of Roman law of the University of Ferrara. He is also known for his dissertation 'De restitutione Purpurarum', about the colour purple in antiquity)(Collation: the collation is sometimes irregular, but consistent and complete, details on request)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 150253 Euro 750,00
COLUTHUS. KOLOUTOU HARPAGÊ HELENÊS. Coluthi raptus Helenae. Recensuit ad fidem codicum MSS. ac variantes lectiones et notas adiecit Joannes Daniel a Lennep. Accedunt eiusdem animadversionum libri tres tum in Coluthum tum in nonnullos alios auctores. Leeuwarden, (Leovardiae), Ex officina Guilielmi Coulon, Illustr. Frisiae Ordd. & Acad. Typographi, (colophon: Typis J. Brouwer, Franequerae), 1747. 8vo. 26,127,(1 blank);215,(1 colophon) p. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Hoffmann I,471; Brunet 2,173/74; Ebert 5018) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints; title in red & black; Greek text with facing Latin translation, and critical notes on the lower part of the page; the second part of the work consists of 2 books with a commentary on Coluthus, and a third on several other Greek authors)(Condition: Vellum showing the patina of its age; free endpapers gone; edges of first leaves thumbed; yellowing, the title page somewhat browning) (Note: The second edition of the OCD (1970) is rather negative about the Greek epic poet of Egyptian origin Coluthus (or Colluthus), ca. 5th cent. A.D. His only surviving work, the 'Rape of Helena', an epyllion of 392 hexameters, is deemed uninspired and clearly influenced by Nonnus. Dibdin, in his famous bibliography, and much later H.J. Rose, in his 'A Handbook of Greek literature' did not take the trouble of mentioning him at all. The 11th edition of the Encyclopeda Brittanica of 1910, volume VI, finds the poem 'dull and tasteless, devoid of imagination, a poor imitation of Homer, and (it) has little to recommend it except its harmonious versification, based upon the technical rules of Nonnus'. The RE, volume XI of 1922, col. 1099, s.v. 'Kolluthos' is harsh, and finds his poetry 'Machwerk, sprachliche und sachliche Stümperei'. Nowadays Coluthus' poetry is rehabilitated. Der Neue Pauly, volume 3 of 1999, is positive. Coluthus is called 'ein vollendeter Künstler', who imitates Homer. 'Der Tradition hellenistischer Dichtung folgend, wendet er die stilistischen Regeln der 'imitatio', der 'variatio', und der 'oppositio in imitando' an'. (NP s.v. Kolluthos) In 2010 Coluthus' poem was upgraded to 'a short and charming miniature epic'. (Griffin,J., 'The Cambridge Companion to the Epic', Cambr. 2010, p. 28) The 'Rape of Helena' tells the story of the Trojan prince Paris and Helena, the wife of the Spartan king Menelaus, from the wedding of Peleus and Thetis, the judgement of Paris, the elopement of Helena from Sparta, till the arrival of Paris and Helena in Troy, and as we all know 'Helenae raptus belli Trojani causa habendus'. The young Dutch scholar Johannes Daniël van Lennep, born in Leeuwarden in 1724, chose to produce this edition of Coluthus to finish his studies under Valckenaer and Schrader at the University of Franeker. He did not edit Coluthus to rehabilitate him, or because he liked his poetry, it has nothing to recommend itself, he says in the preface, but as a proof of his competence as a scholar on the threshold of a scholarly career. (page V) The professor of Greek at Leyden University, Tiberius Hemsterhuis, who Van Lennep much admired, and under whom he wanted to continue his studies, once called the work of Coluthus 'corruptissimum simul et mutilum'. (p. VI) Van Lennep produced his Coluthus to show him that he was able to amend this corrupt text. (p. VII) He thanks his professor Valckenaer for giving him his collation of an important manuscript, the Vossianus. He thanks also Jacobus Philippus d'Orville, 1696-1775, since 1730 professor Greek of the Athenaeum Illustre of Amsterdam, and the young scholar David Ruhnkenius, 1723-1798, for their collations of important manuscripts, which they consulted in the libraries of Florence, Paris, Milan and Hamburg. (p. XI & XIII). On stylistic grounds he dates the poem not long after Nonnus and Tryphiodorus. (p. XX) (See for Van Lennep, J.G. Gerretzen, 'Schola Hemsterhusiana', Nijmegen-Utrecht, 1940, p. 312-329) Van Lennep studied under Hemsterhuis another 5 years. In 1752 he was appointed professor of Greek and Latin at the University of Groningen. He died in 1771 in Franeker) (Collation: *8, 2*6 (minus leaf 2*6); A-H8 (leaf H8 verso blank); A-N8, O4)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 130319 Euro 185,00
CORSINUS,E. Notae graecorum, sive vocum et numerorum compendia, quae in aereis atque marmoreis graecorum tabulis observantur. Collegit, recensuit, explicavit easdemque tabulas opportune illustravit Eduardus Corsinus, Cl. Reg. Scholarum Piarum in Academia Pisana Philosophiae Professor. Accedunt dissertationes sex quibus marmora quaedam tum sacra tum profana exponuntur ac emendantur. Florence (Florentiae), e Typographio Imperiali, 1749. Folio. 2 parts in 1: 48,92;132 p., 1 folding table. Vellum 38 cm (Ref: Brunet 2,309; Sandys 2,379; Neue Pauly 13,282 & 15/3,1177) (Details: Title in red & black; big engraved title vignet: 2 seated angels, one pointing at the radiant symbol of 'Maria Mater Theou' in the background; between them an inscription: 'IN SPIRITU SCIENTIAE ET PIETATIS'. This vignet is an engraving of the Italian painter and etcher Giuseppe Zocchi, 1711-1767. (He is best known for his series of views of Florence). 6 engraved or woodcut head pieces; 6 big engraved initials; several woodcut tail pieces) (Condition: Vellum worn, soiled & slightly wrinkled; corners bumped; head & tail of spine chafed; some damage to the vellum on the outer edges; a few nearly invisible wormholes in the vellum of front and rear cover; small paper repair in upper margin of the front pastedown) (Note: Odoardo Corsini (Eduardus Corsinus), Italian historian, mathematician, philosopher & epigrapher, 1702-1763. He published important works on chronology and epigraphy. His Fasti Attici, published in 1744-56, laid the foundation for the chronology of the Attic Archontes; he also studied problems connected with the chronology of the Panhellenic Games. In 1749 he published this great work on Greek abbreviations for words and numerals; after the prolegomena of 48 p. follow the lemmata with abbreviations in alphabetical order; the second part consists of six dissertations with commentaries and text editions of already published and not yet published inscriptions, together forming an ample 'Appendix ad notas graecorum in qua graeca quaedam marmora partim edita partim inedita proferuntur, ac variis dissertationibus illustrantur') (Provenance: Engraved bookplate on verso of front flyleaf: Ex libris Nino Vassura) (Collation: § - 6§4, A - K4 L2 M4; a - p4 q6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 103484 Euro 800,00
CRISPINUS, JOHANNES. Io. Crispini Lexicon Graecolatinum. Nunc recens restitutum & auctum. Cui accessere novi & perutiles duo indices, quorum prior ex methodo ab Henr. Steph. observata, voces simplices, compositas & derivatas, quae in Lexico sparsim leguntur in unum veluti fasciculum congestas exhibet. Posterior est vocum Latinarum: quo tanquam Latino Graeco Lexico studiosi uti poterunt. Geneva (Coloniae Allobrogum) Apud Ioannem Vignon, 1615. 8vo. (XIV),(2 blank) p.; 1851 (recte 1856) columns; (31)(1 blank);(236;272 indices) p. Vellum. 24 cm (Details: Title with engraved borders; the lexicon is in 2 columns a page, the indices have 4 columns) (Condition: Back gone; covers soiled & scratched; all four ties gone; front endpapers renewed; edges of the title thumbed and chipping; nasty fold in the title, paper repair on verso of the title; foxed, paper yellowing, several gatherings slightly browning; upper & lower edge slightly waterstained) (Note: Jean Crespin, 1520-1572, was an important printer/scholar in Geneva during the third quarter of the 16th century. He was an expert on the Greek & Latin languages, and first published his Lexicon Graecolatinum in 1554. Several editions followed. This 1615 edition has features in common with the edition of 1566, i.e. the same 3 introductory poems, the same praefatio in Greek by Crispinus, and it has the same number of appendices (short works meant to help the user of the lexicon, e.g. on dialects, 'verba anomalia' etc.) with more or less the same titles. The lexicon of 1566 was an abridged version 'plus maniable' and 'plus économique' in quarto of a big 2 volume edition in folio, which was published in 1562. The first index of this lexicon is for Greek; the second index has Latin lemmata, in order to make it possible to use the lexicon for translation from Latin into Greek)(cf. G.-F. Gilmont, Bibliographie des éditions de Jean Crespin, 1550-1572. Verviers, 1981) (Collation: ¶8 (leaf ¶8 blank); a-3O8; 2A-2O8, 2P6, 2Q2, 2R-3K8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140079 Euro 125,00
CUPER,G. Gisb. Cuperi Harpocrates, sive Explicatio imagunculae argenteae perantiquae, quae in figuram Harpocratis formata representat Solem. Ejusdem Monumenta antiqua inedita. Multi auctorum loci, multae inscriptiones, marmora, nummi, gemmae, varii ritus, & antiquitates in utroque opusculo emendantur & illustrantur. Accedit Stephani Le Moine Epistola de Melanophoris. Utrecht (Trajecti ad Rhenum), Apud Franciscum Halma, Acad. Typogr., 1687. 4to. (VIII),294,(14 index) p., frontispiece, 6 plates, of which 5 folding, text engravings. Vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: Brunet 6, no. 22603; Cicognara 3212; Ebert 5512) (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints; frontispiece depicting Harpocrates standing on a pedestal, around him gods like Apollo, Hermes, Serapis and Isis, and in the foreground Tempus, who shovels for Egyptian antiquities. Title printed in red and black; woodcut printer's mark on the title, motto: 'vivitur in genio', 'only through his genius man survives'; 3 woodcut headpieces, 3 cul de lampe vignettes, text engravings on 39 pages, small woodcuts on 2 pages; 6 plates depicting ancient monuments) (Condition: Vellum soiled and slightly stained; front flyleaf gone) (Note: This book is a philological tour de force of the Dutch classical scholar Gisbertus Cuper, or Cuperus, in Dutch Gijsbert Kuiper, 1644-1716. He was professor of Latin and Greek literature at the Athenaeum Illustre of Deventer from 1668 till 1681, and at the same time mayor of this old city, which once had been a member of the Hanseatic League. Cuper has his own lemma on Wikipedia. (In Dutch only) In this book Cuper examines a deity of Egyptian origin, Harpocrates, who was imported into Rome in the second century B.C., and who was connected with the mystery cult of the Egyptian goddess Isis. Cuper's research began, he tells us in the preface, with a small silver statuette which he saw in the famous collection of his friend and scholar Johannes Smetius, whom he visited in 1674 in Nijmegen. The statuette was found in the ground of the collector's hometown Nijmegen. It is a sculpture of a small boy, almost naked, and with a lotus flower on his head. He is winged and wears a small quiver on his back; the boy holds the index finger of his right hand against his lips, as if to enjoin silence. (p. 1: 'manus dextrae digito indice premit vocem, & silentia suadet') From his right arm hangs a small bucket (situla), and around his left arm coils a snake. His left hand rests on a club, around which another snake coils, and to which a goose has been attached. At the boy's right foot sits a rabbit or hare. At his left foot a small bird of prey (accipiter vel alia avis). (p. 2) As soon as Cuper saw this aenigmatic figurine, he decided to examine it, for he could not imagine that all those attributes had been added without any intention. He recognized the boy from a Egyptian hieroglyph as Harpocration, whom Egyptian superstition brought to Rome. He immediately realized also that this boy did not ask for silence (non silentium tantum digito suadens), but that he represented the Sun (verum Solis imaginem referens). (p. 2) In the rest of the book Cuper closely examines all the relevant passages concerning Harpocrates' iconography in ancient authors, in mythology, on gemmae, coins, inscriptions, amulets etc., to prove his point, that Harpocrates's finger was misunderstood, from the Roman scholar Varro to Augustine, and that the boy was not a diety of Silence at all. The boy did not ask for silence, he argues, but was a representation of the rising sun, because the ancient Egyptians greeted and honoured it's appearance by pressing their index finger against their lips. The 'Harpocrates' was first published in 1676 in Amsterdam 'apud Theodorum Pluymer'. This 1684 edition is a reissue, considerably augmented with 'Gisberti Cuperi Monumenta antiqua inedita' (ca. 70 pages) in which Cuper discusses recent finds. He offers a description and image of the finds, and tries to explain matters with the help of ancient sources and the work of contemporary scholars. At the end has also been added 'Ad Gisb. Cuperum De Melanphoris epististola' (30 pages) written by the French orientalist Stephanus Le Moine, 1624-1689, who lectured in Leiden since 1676. His letter is a treatise on the black clothes (melamphoroi), which the members of the Isis fraternities wore when they lamented the fate of their goddess. This book of Cuper is tough reading, the Latin is difficult and it abounds in philological pedantry. The Latin text of the second part of the book, Cuper's 'Monumenta antiqua inedita', can be found on: http://www.stilus.nl/cuper/, where one can also download a translation of it into Dutch by Leo Nellissen, who is an expert on Smetius) (Collation: *4 (including frontispiece); A-Z4, Aa-Pp4, Qq2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151911 Euro 640,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Q. Curtius Hoog-beroemde historie. Van t' leven ende de daden van Alexander de Groote. Inhoudende hoe hy Europa overheert, Darius der Persen Coninck met gantsch Asia ende India tot de Oceanische zee t'ondergebragt ende eyntlick tot Babilon gestorven is. Overgeset uit den Latyn door A. S(nel) Delft (Tot Delf), By Adriaen Gerrits, 1613. Small 8vo. (XVI) p.; 323 leaves,(10 index) p., engraved portrait of Alexander. Vellum 16 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 105,1: the first translation into Dutch; OiN 154) (Details: 3 thongs laced through cover; manuscript short title on the back; covers blindstamped; engraved title; at the beginning of the translation an engraved portrait of 'Alexander de Groote, Coninck van Macedonien') (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled and spotted; endpapers renewed; the 3 outer margins of the title, which were frayed and somewhat damaged, are skillfully repaired; right margin of 2nd leaf frayed & slightly soiled) (Note: Quintus Curtius Rufus, probably first cent. A.D., is the author of the only surviving monography on Alexander the Great in Latin. He was an historian enough to use sources, which drew from different traditions, conscientiously. His aim was not to write great literature, but his 'Historia' certainly possesses great narrative qualities, acquired by a thorough knowledge of the Roman epic and historiographic traditions, and a training in Roman rhetoric. (NP, s.v. Curtius). This is the first edition of the first translation into Dutch of Curtius Rufus. The aim of the translator is didactic. The reader, the translator says in the preface, 'Voor-reden totten Leser', must learn from the best examples what to do and what to avoid. He can do this best by reading the ancient historians, of whom Curtius Rufus is the best. He turns against those who proclaim that Dutch is inferior to Latin. We learn also which edition Snel used for his translation, the 'Raphalyn'. This must be the edition of 'De rebus gestis Alexandri Magni' published 'ex officina Plantiniana Raphelengii' in Leiden in 1606. The translation is preceded by 'Byvoeghingh uit verschyden schrijvers tot vervullinghe van Quinti Curtii eerste' and 'tweede' boec.' This is a translation of a reconstruction of the lost first 2 books from other sources. Van der Aa does not know much about Snel. Only his translation of Curtius Rufus is mentioned. The NNBW does not mention him at all. In the short preface to the second edition of 1627, signed by one Albrecht Snel, we discover more about Snel. The preface of 1627 is in fact a dedicatio to the 'Rulers' of the city of Delft and the 'Opper-Heeren', that is curators of the local Schola Latina. Albrecht Snel tells the reader that he is a teacher at the local Schola Latina, and that he wants to dedicate his translation as first-fruits to the excellent members of the City Council, just like the old Greeks did when they wanted to thank their benefactors. He calls his bosses 'Voedster-Heeren', i.e. sponsors, or patrons of Greek and Latin, and of those whom they charge to teach them at the local school. The translation was a big success. It saw, according to Geerebaert, 15 reissues, the last one in 1765) (Collation: *8, A-2S8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120045 Euro 240,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Hoogberoemde historie van 't leven ende de daden Alexandri de Groote. Inhoudende hoe hy Europa overheerd, Darius der Persen Coninck met gansch Asia ende India tot de Oceanische Zee t'ondergebraght heeft, ende eyntlijck tot Babilon gestorven is. Overgeset uyt Latijn door A. SNEL. Den vierden druck gecorrigeert. Rotterdam, By Pieter van Waesbergen, 1648. 8vo. 513,(14) p. Vellum 16 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 105,c; OiN 154; Schweiger 2,328) (Details: Engraved title, depicting Alexander on horseback, at his feet a trampled Darius; printed in Gothic type, as is usual with translations into Dutch) (Condition: Shabby: vellum worn, back wrinkled; small tear at head of spine; book block loose in binding; front endpapers gone; rear endpapers loose; title soiled, loosening and with thumbed edges; small wormhole in the first 6 leaves near the left upper corner; first 2 gatherings dampstained at the lower margin; gatherings quite loose) (Note: This Dutch translation of Curtius Rufus was a great success. It was first published in 1613, and was reissued 15 times, for the last time ca. 1765. It was far more popular than the translation of Glazemaker that was reprinted only 2 times. Not much is known of the translator A. Snel. Van der Aa only records what we know already, that one A. Snel produced a translation of Curtius Rufus. The short preface of the second edition of 1627, signed by one Albrecht Snel, which is reprinted here in this 4th edition, learns us more. It is in fact a dedicatio to the 'Rulers' of the city of Delft and the 'Opper-Heeren', that is curators of the local Schola Latina. Albrecht Snel tells the reader that he is a teacher at the local Schola Latina, and that he wants to dedicate his translation as first-fruits to the excellent members of the City Council, just like the old Greeks did when they wanted to thank their benefactors. He calls his bosses 'Voedster-Heeren', i.e. sponsors, or patrons of Greek and Latin, and of those whom they charge to teach them at the local school. From the preface of the first edition of 1613 of this translation, and which was left out in later editions, we learn more about Snel. We learn something about his aim while translating Curtius Rufus. His aim is didactic. We must, Snel says, learn from the best examples available, what to do and what to avoid. We can do this best by reading the ancient historians, of whom Curtius Rufus is the best. Snel turns against those who proclaim that Dutch is inferior to Latin. We learn also which text Snel used for his translation, the 'Raphalyn'. This must be the edition of 'De rebus gestis Alexandri Magni' published 'ex officina Plantiniana Raphelengii' in Leiden in 1606. The translation is preceded by 'Byvoeghingh uit verschyden schrijvers tot vervullinghe van Quinti Curtii eerste' and 'tweede' boec.' This is a translation of a reconstruction of the lost first 2 books from other sources) (Collation: A-2K8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120048 Euro 150,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Q. Curtii Rufi Historia Alexandri Magni. Cum notis selectiss. Variorum, Raderi, Freinshemii, Loccenii, Blancardi, &c. Editio accuratissima. Accurante C.S.M.D. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Ex officina Elzeviriana, 1664. 8vo. (IV),93,46,(1 blank);751,(1) p. folding map, and folding plate. Mottled 18th century calf 19.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 094956561; Schweiger 2,320; Willems 1325; Berghman 2054; Rahir 1369; Moss 548; Dibdin 375; Graesse 2,311; Ebert 5549) (Details: Beautiful binding. Back with 5 raised bands and panelled gilt with repeating floral motifs; in the center of the compartments gilt birds visit a bunch of flowers. Brown morocco letterpiece in the second compartment. All 3 edges of both boards gilt. Edges of the bookblock dyed red. Endpapers marbled. Engraved title, which depicts a world conquering Alexander on horseback, trampling his enemy Darius. He is accompanied by a flying Fama, who blows her horn. The plate depicts the 'fons solis', a fountain in the Egyptian oasis of the temple of Ammon, cool at midday and warm at the rising and setting of the sun. Alexander visited this famous oracle in order to obtain an answer concerning the divinity of his origin; the map shows the triumphal march of Alexander through Egypt and Asia) (Condition: Fine. Some slight rubbing on the upper board. Some light foxing) (Note: This is a typical Variorum edition. It offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of these sometimes overloaded 'dustbins' of knowledge was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. In a 'Variorum' edition of Claudianus published by the same Elzevier a year later, we get a glimpse of such a division of labour. There the 'typographus', i.e. Louis and/or Daniel Elzevier, tells the reader that a 'vir diligentissimus' the schoolmaster Cornelius Schrevelius, excerpted from the best sources all that was necessary for a good understanding of the text. 'Quod ad praestantissimi poetae intellectum pertineret, ex optimis Doctissimorum Virorum', follows a number of names of Claudianus editors and commentators, 'aliorumque, qui antea in eo illustrando elaborarunt, notis & commentariis selectissima quaeque excerpsit'. § Quintus Curtius Rufus, probably first cent. A.D., is the author of the only surviving monography on Alexander the Great in Latin. He was historian enough to use sources, which drew from different traditions, conscientiously. His aim was not to write great literature, but his 'Historia' certainly possesses great narrative qualities, acquired by a thorough knowledge of the epic and historiographic tradition, and a training in Roman rhetoric. (NP, s.v. Curtius) This work, consisting of 10 books, did not survive in its entirety, the first 2 books are lost. Now, the text of Curtius Rufus is preceded here by a rather strange philological accomplishment by the German scholar Johannes Casper Freinsheim, 1608-1660. He endeavoured to repair the loss of the 2 lost books by a composition of his own, a feat which was much admired by his contemporaries. He published this new text earlier in his edition of 1640. Moss declares that this supplemented text is 'scarcely descernible from that of Q. Curtius'. This 'Variorum' edition of Curtius Rufus was produced by the above mentioned Cornelis Schrevelius, 1608 - 1664, who took his doctoral degree in Paris as a Doctor of Medicine in 1627. Hence C.S.M.D. on the title, that is 'Cornelis Schrevelius Medicus Doctor'. He was Rector of the Schola Latina at Leiden) (Provenance: name in ballpoint on the front flyleaf of Lennart Håkanson, professor of Latin Literature at the Univ. of Uppsala, 1980-1987) (Collation: pi2, a-h8, i4, k2; A-3A8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130180 Euro 340,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Q. Curtii Rufi Historia Alexandri Magni. Cum notis selectiss. Variorum, Raderi, Freinshemii, Loccenii, Blancardi, &c. Editio accuratissima, accurante C.S.M.D. (And:) J. Freinshemii Supplementorum in Q. Curtium liber I (& II). Amsterdam, Ex Officina Elzeviriana, 1673. 8vo. 2 parts in 1: 751,(1); 93,(48),(1 blank) p., engraved title, 1 plate, 1 map. Overlapping vellum 19 cm (Ref: Willems 1482; Berghman 2055; Rahir 1590; Schweiger 2,321; Moss 548; Dibdin 375: 'the edition of 1673 is the most correct and beautiful') (Details: 6 thongs laced through covers; engraved title, depicting a world conquering Alexander on horseback, trampling his enemy Darius. He is accompanied by a flying Fama, who blows her horn; a plate depicts the 'fons solis', a fountain in the Egyptian oasis of the temple of Ammon, cool at midday and warm at the rising and setting of the sun. Alexander visited this famous oracle in order to obtain an answer concerning the divinity of his origin; the map shows the triumphal march of Alexander through Egypt and Asia) (Condition: Good condition; back soiled; a small unobstrusive wormhole in the gutter of the first half, not affecting text; old & small paper label on the back) (Note: This is a typical Variorum edition. It offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of these sometimes overloaded 'dustbins' of knowledge was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. In a Variorum edition of Claudianus published by the same Elzevier in 1665, we get a glimpse of such a division of labour. There the 'typographus', i.e. Louis and/or Daniel Elzevier, tells the reader that a 'vir diligentissimus' the schoolmaster Cornelius Schrevelius, excerpted from the best sources all that was necessary for a good understanding of the text. 'Quod ad praestantissimi poetae intellectum pertineret, ex optimis Doctissimorum Virorum', follows a number of names of Claudianus editors and commentators, 'aliorumque, qui antea in eo illustrando elaborarunt, notis & commentariis selectissima quaeque excerpsit'. The Roman historian Quintus Curtius Rufus, probably first century A.D., is the author of the only surviving monography on Alexander the Great in Latin. He was an historian enough to use sources, which drew from different traditions, conscientiously. His aim was not to write great literature, but his 'Historia' certainly possesses great narrative qualities, acquired by a thorough knowledge of the epic and historiographic tradition, and a training in Roman rhetoric. (NP, s.v. Curtius) This work, consisting of 10 books, did not survive in its entirety, the first 2 books are lost. Now, the text of Curtius Rufus is followed here by a rather strange philological accomplishment by the German scholar Johannes Casper Freinsheim, 1608-1660. He endeavoured to repair the loss of the 2 lost books by a composition of his own, a feat which was much admired by his contemporaries. He published this new text earlier in his edition of 1640. Moss declares that this supplemented text is 'scarcely descernible from that of Q. Curtius'. This Variorum edition of Curtius Rufus was, as it happens, produced by the above mentioned Cornelis Schrevelius, 1608 - 1664, who took his doctoral degree in Paris as a Doctor of Medicine in 1627. Hence C.S.M.D. on the title, that is 'Cornelis Schrevelius Medicus Doctor'. He was Rector of the Schola Latina at Leiden.) (Provenance: The label on the back reads: 'Litt Antiq. A.J. v. B.C.' This must be Aarnoud Jan van Beeck Calkoen, 1805-1874, born in Leiden. He went to Utrecht to study law. There he settled as a lawyer, and grew into politics. (NNBW 9,123) (Collation: pi2, A-3A8; (map after gathering A; folding plate after leaf M4); a-h8, i4, k2 (leaf k2 verso blank) ( Photographs on request)
Book number: 130415 Euro 325,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Q. Curtii Rufi, Historia Alexandri Magni, cum notis selectiss. Variorum, Raderi, Freinshemii, Loccenii, Blancardi etc. Editio novissima cui accessit locorum difficiliorum interpretatio. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Ex typographia Blauiana, sumptibus Societatis, 1684. 8vo. (IV),86,(44),818,(1),(1 blank) p., engraved title, 1 folding map & 1 engraved plate. Vellum. 20 cm (Ref: Schweiger p 321; Brunet 2.450; Graesse 2,311; Spoelder p. 486, Amsterdam 4) (Details: Prize copy, the prize is however gone. 6 thongs laced through the joints. Back with gilt fillets. Boards with double fillet borders, the gilt coat of arms of Amsterdam in the center, and gilt cornerpieces. Engraved title, depicting Alexander on horseback, who crushes an ennemy and is accompanied by a flying Fama. The plate depicts the 'fons solis', a fountain in the Egyptian oasis of the temple of Ammon, cool at midday and warm at the rising and setting of the sun. Alexander visited this famous oracle in order to obtain an answer concerning the divinity of his origin) (Condition: Vellum soiled. Gilt on the back faded away. Binding worn at the extremes. The right margin of the first 8 gatherings is waterstained. Both pastedowns worn. The last page of the index is loose, and has thumbed and chipping edges. The slightly waterstained map is also loose and its edges are thumbed) (Note: This is a typical Variorum edition. It offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum' never broke new ground. The production of these sometimes overloaded 'dustbins' of knowledge was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. In a Variorum edition of Claudianus published by Elzevier in 1665 we get a glimpse of such a division of labour. There the 'typographus' tells the reader that a 'vir diligentissimus' the schoolmaster Cornelius Schrevelius, excerpted from the best sources all that was necessary for a good understanding of the text. 'Quod ad praestantissimi poetae intellectum pertineret, ex optimis Doctissimorum Virorum' (here follows a number of names of Claudianus editors and commentators) 'aliorumque, qui antea in eo illustrando elaborarunt, notis & commentariis selectissima quaeque excerpsit'. As to the Curtius edition on offer here: we have compared this anonymously published edition of Blaeu with the Elzevier edition of Curtius Rufus of 1664, and found out that the text is an almost exact copy. Blaeu used for the engraved title even the plate of the previously published edition. Blaeu only erased the name of the editor, who is, as it happens, Cornelius Schrevelius, and instructed an engraver to replace the name by: 'Editio novissima, cui accessit locorum difficiliorum interpretatio'. This was done to fool the public. The promised explanation of difficult places (placed between the text, which is printed at the top of the page, and the 'notis variorum' at the lower half), is very scant, obvious and redundant. The rest is the same. The text of Curtius Rufus is preceded by a rather strange philological accomplishment, a feat which was much admired by his contemporaries, the endeavour to repair the loss of the first 2 books of the 'Historia Alexandri Magni'. This new Latin text was produced earlier by the German classicist Johannes Casper Freinsheim, 1608-1660, in his edition of 1640. Moss declares that this supplemented text is 'scarcely descernible from that of Q. Curtius') (Collation: *2, a-h8, i2 (leaf i1 loose, minus blank leaf i2); A-3E8, 3F2 ) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130045 Euro 190,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Quinti Curtii Rufi De rebus gestis Alexandri Magni, regis Macedonum, libri superstites. Cum omnibus supplementis, variantibus lectionibus, commentariis ac notis perpetuis, Fr. Modii, V. Acidalii, T. Popmae, Joh. Freinshemii, Joh. Schefferi, Christoph. Cellarii, Nic. Heinsii. Selectis & excerptis Ph. Rubenii, J. Rutgersii, C. Barthii, Joh. Loccenii, M. Raderi, Cl. Salmasii, J.F. Gronovii, M. Tellierii, Christoph. Aug. Heumanni, itemque Jac. Perizonii vindiciis, & aliorum observationibus, auctioribusque indicibus curavit & digessit Henricus Snakenburg. Delft, Leiden (Delphis & Lugd. Bat.), Apud Adrianum Beman, Samuelem Luchtmans, 1724. 4to. (XXXVII),824,222,1 p. Frontispiece, folding map & 17 engraved plates. Vellum 25 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,323; Brunet 2,450: 'édition très estimée'; Moss 2,549: 'This is undoubtedly a very excellent and copious edition'; Ernesti 2,352/3; Dibdin 2,376/7: 'a very valuable performance, and deservedly held in high respect'; Ebert 5554: 'Eine der schätzbarst. Ausgg. dieser Art'; Spoelder p. 580, 's-Gravenhage 5) (Details: Prize copy, without the prize. Back with 6 raised bands; borders of covers gilt; gilt coat of arms of The Hague on covers; title in red & black; woodcut printer's mark of Luchtmans on title; folding map of the expedition of Alexander; plates with archaeological object, mythological scenes and portraits) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled) (Note: 'This is one of the most valuable Editions of the Latin Classics I have ever read. Snakenburg has approved himself in this work to be a very able and judicious critic. Few editors have illustrated their authors so well'. With this quotation begins the review of Moss of this quarto Variorum edition. Like other Variorum editions it offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, in this case the text published by the German scholar Johannes Casper Freinsheim, 1608-1660, which appeared in 1640. The text on the upper half of the pages is accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists on the lower half, These are taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like this one, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of these sometimes overloaded 'dustbins' of knowledge was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Yet Snakenburg did also some research. In a long and well-wrought introduction Snakenburg elaborates on the books he used, and the scholars who helped him. He seems to have digested anything worth knowing about Curtius Rufus. He also asked permission from the University Library of Leiden to consult a 'codex antiquissimus'. He further inspected 2 other manuscripts, one 'minime negligendus', and the third of a more recent date, both 'codices Vossiani'. He collected readings, emendations, and collations from all normative sources, but also e.g. annotations which he found in the margins of a book once owned by the Dutch scholar Nicolaas Heinsius, 1620-1681. Quintus Curtius Rufus, probably first cent. A.D., is the author of the only surviving monography on Alexander the Great in Latin. This work, consisting of 10 books, did not survive in its entirety, the first 2 books are lost. The text of Curtius Rufus is preceded in this edition by a rather peculiar philological accomplishment by Freinsheim. He endeavoured to repair the loss of the 2 lost books by a composition of his own, a feat which was much admired by his contemporaries. He had published this addition earlier in his edition of 1640. The only thing Hendrik Snakenburg, 1674-1750, ever did for scholarship is this Variorum edition. The praise and success which he earned with this one edition, makes it likely that he was a good critic with a sound judgement. Snakenburg spent his life teaching classics at the Schola Latina of Leiden. In 1740 he was appointed Rector. In Leiden he was befriended with the classical scholar J. Gronovius and one of the publishers of this book, Samuel Luchtmans. His portrait, painted by J. Houbraken in 1715, is in the possession of the 'Lakenhal' in Leiden. (For Snakenburg see Van der Aa 17-2,801 and NNBW 2,1333/4) (Provenance: In pencil on the front pastedown: 'Dr. Brinkgreve'. This is Dr. Marius Roelof Johan Brinkgreve, 1888-1966, a Dutch teacher of classics at the gymnasium of Utrecht, (1912-1919), later till 1937 the director of 'Koninklijke Begeer' a silver-factory in the small town of Voorschoten. He was an active fascist, ca. 1933 party offical of the 'Nationale Unie', and in 1934 leader of the 'Algemeene Nederlandsche Fascisten Bond'. During WW II he sided with the German oppressor. (See for Brinkgreve, 'Repertorium kleine politieke partijen, 1918-1967'; also G. Brinkgreve, 'Schrijvend in 't Aalsmeerder veerhuis, opstellen van Geurt Brinkgreve', 1982, p. 93/105, with a portrait) (Collation: pi1 (frontispiece), +-2+4, 3+2 (minus leaf 3+2), *-7*4, A-6P4, 6Q4 (minus leaf 6Q4) 6R2 (leaf 6R2 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140111 Euro 425,00
CURTIUS RUFUS. Q. Curtii Rufi De rebus Alexandri Magni historia, supplementis Freinshemii aucta, commentariisque Chr. Cellarii, ac indicibus, & figuris aeneis inlustrata. The Hague (Hagae Comitum), Typis Alberts & vander Kloot, 1727. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XLII),392,(19),(1 blank); (IV),357,(18 index),(1 blank) p., 2 frontispieces. Mottled calf 16 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,323, see also Schweiger 2,328; Dibdin 2,376 s.v. Cellarii; Ebert 5555; cf. Brunet 2,451) (Details: Backs with 5 raised bands, and panelled gilt with floral motifs; brown morocco shield in second compartment; endpapers marbled; 2 frontispieces, both originally belonging to the edition of the French translation, published by the same publisher in the same year; the frontispiece depicts a triumphant Alexander on horseback, trampling his enemy Darius; title in red & black; engraved architectural ornament on the title; good paper, well printed) (Condition: Bindings worn at the extremities; backs slightly rubbed; head of spine of the first volume very slightly damaged; 2 names on the title; lacking the engraved plates announced on the title) (Note: The publishing firm of Alberts & Vander Kloot produced in 1727 three different Curtius Rufus editions. For each of them they probably had a different kind of customer in mind. (1:) For the scholar/student and the gentleman well versed in Latin they published a Latin only edition. The title is: 'Q. Curtii Rufi De rebus Alexandri Magni historia, supplementis Freinshemii aucta, commentariisque Chr. Cellarii, ac indicibus, & figuris aeneis inlustrata'. (2:) For the same clientele and the less well versed gentleman they published an edition of the Latin text, with an opposing French translation. The title of this second category is: 'Quinte Curce, De la vie et des actions d'Alexandre le Grand. De la traduction de Mr. De Vaugelas, avec les Supplemens, de Freinshemius traduits par M. Du Rier. Latin & François'. (3:) And for those who could not read Latin, but were interested in Classics or Alexander the Great, they published a French translation only edition. The title is the same as 2, but without the statement 'Latin & François'. To complicate matters even more, the publisher also sold copies to people who could afford a book with engraved plates, and to those less well to do, who could do without the plates. Our copy is an example of the first listed here, but without the plates. It appears that, with so much possibilities at hand, the printer erroneously combined for a number of copies the Latin title with the frontispiece for the French translation. § Quintus Curtius Rufus, probably first cent. A.D., is the author of the only surviving monography on Alexander the Great in Latin. This work, consisting of 10 books, did not survive in its entirety, the first 2 books are lost. The text of Curtius Rufus is preceded in this edition by a rather peculiar philological accomplishment by the German scholar Johannes Casper Freinsheim, 1608-1660. He endeavoured to repair the loss of the 2 lost books by a composition of his own, a feat which was much admired by his contemporaries. He published this new text earlier in his edition of 1640. Moss declares that this supplemented text is 'scarcely descernible from that of Q. Curtius'. (Moss 2,548) § Freinsheim was the foremost representative scholar of the flourishing school of Roman history at the University of Strassburg. His editions of the Roman historians were distinguished for their excellence. The unknown editor of the 1727 edition chose the concise commentary of the German scholar Christoph Cellarius, 1638-1707, to accompany the Latin text. Cellarius was famous for his works on grammar and style, and for his editions of Latin historians. His commentaries were concise, and written in elegant Latin. (Sandys 2,369 & Dibdin). His edition of Curtius Rufus was first published in 1688) (Provenance: Name at the edge of the title of 'John Brodie'. On the rear endpaper of vol. 1 is written: 'John Brody his book, 1772'. Under the impressum written in a different hand 'Bungie C-1-3', or 'Brangie') (Collation: volume 1: pi1 = frontispiece, *6 (minus leaf *6) 2*-3*8, A-2A8 2B4 2C8 2D2; volume 2: pi2 = frontispiece & title, A-Z8 2A4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120232 Euro 175,00
DESRIVIERES, DIT BOURGUIGNON,F. Loisirs d'un Soldat du Régiment des Gardes Françoises. Seconde édition, revue, corrigée & augmentée. (Broché, 1 liv., 10 sous) (And:) Réponse de l'auteur à différentes critiques dont on a honoré Ses Loisirs. (Bound with:) Réponse des Soldats du Régiment des Gardes Françoises, aux Loisirs d'un Soldat du même Régiment.nd ad 1: A Amsterdam, & se trouve à Paris, Chez Saillant, Libraire, rue Saint-Jean-de Beauvais, 1767; ad 2: N.pl., 1767. 8vo. 2 volumes, consisting of 3 parts, bound in 1 volume: (1),174;48 p. Contemporary wrappers. 18 cm (Ref: Cf. Cioranescu 23764 & 23765) (Details: Uncut edges. Woodcut ornament on both titles. Some woodcut headpieces) (Condition: Marbled cover scuffed. Paper on the back partly gone. Somewhat dog-eared) (Note: The most important evolution in European warfare of the 17th century was the expansion of its armies. This development started about 1630, rose to a high level during the French wars of expansion (1660-1710), and continued in the 18th century. The increase in scale made it necessary to professionalize logistics, administration and the recruting of soldiers. Most countries formed standing armies. This brought an end to the undisciplined mercenary armies of uncertain loyalty, and strengthened the grip of the central governments on the military. The result was a further knitting together and a growing identification between the nation and its armed forces. The first Military Academies were established, and the compulsory conscription of young and able citizens was organized. The officer's corps consisted predominantly of loyal noblemen, who found in the army a vehicle for their ambitions. (Source R. Lesaffer, Europa: een zoektocht naar vrede? 1453-1763 en 1945-1997. Leuven, 1999, p. 315-317) § This book, anonymously published in 1767, was written by an officer of the Régiment des Gardes Françaises, the infantery regiment of la Maison du Roi of France, the core of the French army, and also responsible for guarding the exterior of the Versailles, and for maintaining public order in Paris. The aim of this officer was to civilize his colleagues and soldiers of the French army. The occupation of a warrior is, he says, a noble and grave one. (p. 10) However, the reputation of the French army, he continues, is lousy. 'Sans les excès auxquels nos Troupes ont été capables de se porter, nos diverses Campagnes au-delà des Monts auroient eu des suites plus heureuses; la France compteroit peut-être la Hollande au nombre de ses Provinces; les Allemands nous aimeroient, & notre nom seroit honoré chez nos autres voisins'. (p. 12) The French soldier should not rape and plunder, but he should behave himself. 'Un Soldat, tel que le demande de la gloire & l'interêt de l'Etat, est un homme qui se fait un devoir de suivre sa Religion, d'aimer sa Patrie, qui sait marcher à l'ennemi, & le combattre'. (p. 15/16) He should love his country and his Monarch. 'Quelque soin que prenne l'amour-propre de grossir notre mérite à nos yeux, l'attachement sacré des François à leur légitimes Souverains, doit être regardé comme la seule qualité solide qui les distingua de tous tems des autres peuples' (p. 28) The role of the École Militaire is important. 'C'est dans ce temple de Mars, que sont conservés, avec dignité, les restes précieux d'un peuple de Héros, qui ne connurent point d'autre fortune que celle de l'Etat, c'est-là que croissent, sous les yeux de Minerve, de jeunes Hercules (...) c'est de là que sortiront des Officiers (...) & que le Soldat n'appercevra en eux aucun des vices, ni des ridicules qui sont les suites d'une éducation campagnarde ou efféminée'. (p. 32) The identity of the author of this book is revealed by the French author, and philosopher Voltaire already in the September issue of the Mercure de France of 1767. There we find on p. 29: a 6 line poem, announced as 'Vers de M. de Voltaire, au sieur Desrivières, Soldat du Régiment des Gardes-Françoises, de la Compagnie De la Tour, à l'occasion d'un livre intitulé: Loisirs d'un Soldat, &.: 'Soldat digne de Xénophon / Ou d'un César, ou d'un Biron, / Ton écrit dans les coeurs allume / Un feu d'une héroïque ardeur; / Ton Régiment sera vainqueur, / Par ton courage & par ta plume'. Not much is known about this Ferdinand Desrivières, dit Bourguignon. Desrivières was born in 1734 in the Bourgogne, and was an officer (sergent), who wrote in his spare time his Loisirs to instruct and enlighten his fellow officers. He signed the preface to this treatise with D*R**S. (Des RivièreS) His Loisirs was first published in Paris by the publisher/librarian Charles Saillant in 1767, and found several reissues. It was translated into German in 1770. In the same year of its first publication (1767) an augmented second edition was published in Amsterdam. Desrivières added a short continuation in which he discussed several reviews of his Loisirs. He later published also an Essai sur le vrai mérite de l'Officier (1769), which was republished in 1771 under a new title: Suite des loisirs d'un Soldat. Guerrier d'après l'Antique et de bons originaux modernes. In 1770 he produced a Compliment des Gardes françoises à Msgr. le Dauphin sur son mariage to congratulate the crown prince, the later King Louis XVI, and his wife Marie Antoinette. He did so en vers grivois. The Amsterdam edition was possibly produced in cooperation with the Huguenot publisher Marc Michel Rey, 1720-1780, who resided in Amsterdam, and published many titles of French philosophers. Rey and Saillant had e.g. previously collaborated in the production Du Contrat Social of the French philosopher J.J. Rousseau. The description of the Bibliothèque National calls the Amsterdam address of this 1767 edition fake, and observes that the book was produced with permission tacite. The first part of this second edition of the Loisirs (p. 9-132) is a line for line reissue of the first edition of Paris 1767. Only the preliminary pages are printed with different type face. The remaining pages (p. 133-174) contain the added observations of Desrivières concerning reviews of the first edition. From the same press comes the second volume, the Réponse des Soldats du Régiment. These 3 parts are seldom found toghether in one volume. The Regiment of Desrivières was disbanded on the 31th of August in 1789. Voltaire praises Desrivières, as we have seen, sky-high (Xenophon, Caesar), but his contemporary, the philosopher Denis Diderot, 1713-1784, one of the editors of the famous Encyclopédie, thought otherwise. He condems him utterly, the man and his style. We cite his opinion on Desrivières' Essai sur le vrai mérite de l'officier of 1769: 'C'est l'ouvrage d'un homme qui a nuls principes, aucune conséquence dans l'esprit; qui ne sait pas penser, et qui ne sait encore moins écrire, insolent et bas, insultant l'étranger et les subalternes, flattant ridiculement les grands; qui se déchaine contre ceux qui croient aux revenants et qui croit aux vertus hériditaires, qui recommande la bonne institution des jeunes gens et qui cite à la page suivante le mérite de Duguesclin qui ne savait pas lire. C'est l'ouvrage d'un homme sans goût et dont les pages sont farcies des plus ridicules citations en vers. Avec tout cela il est si doux de lire des propos ou des actions qui font honneur à l'espèce humaine que je ne mépriserais pas celui qui pourrait aller jusqu'à la dernière page de ce livre, et cela me serait arrivé si l'on ne m'eût prévenu que votre colporteur ne reprenait pas les livres coupés'. (Fragments inédits de Diderot, Revue de l'Histoire littéraire de la France, 1ère année, no. 2, 1894, p. 169) The loyalty to the House of Bourbon, according to Desrivieres essential for the courage of the French soldier, desintegrated rapidly at the beginning of the French Revolution. 'The sympathy shown by the Gardes Françaises for the French Revolution at its outbreak was crucial to the initial success of the rising.' (Wikipedia, s.v. Gardes Françaises). There was desertion in June 1789, and on the 14th of July mutinous Gardes Françaises took part in the storming of the Bastille. What role the 55 year old (if he was still alive) Desrivières played in this, history doesnot tell) (Collation: pi1, A8, B4, C8, D4, E8, F4, G8, H4, I8, K4, L4, M2; N8, O4, P8, Q1; A8, B4, C8, D4 ) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120530 Euro 290,00
DIODORUS SICULUS. DIODÔROS. Diodori Siculi Bibliothecae Historicae libri qui supersunt e recensione Petri Wesselingii, cum interpretatione latina Laur.Rhodomani atque annotationibus Variorum integris indicibusque locupletissimis. Nova editio, cum commentationibus III Chr. Gottl. Heynii et cum argumentis disputationibusque Ier. Nic. Eyringii. Zweibrücken (Biponti), Strassburg, (Argentorati), Ex typographia Societatis, 1793-1807. 8vo. 11 volumes. Together 5259 pages. Contemporary half calf 21 cm (Ref: G. Burkard p.63/66; Hoffmann 1,558; Brunet 2,716; Didbin 1,498/99: 'beautiful and judicial work'; Moss 1,394; Ebert 6159; Graesse 2,395) (Details: Back ruled gilt, red shield in second and fourth 'compartment'. Boards marbled. Nice set) (Condition: Bindings slightly worn; front joint of volume 2 split; front joint of volume 6 partly split; right upper corner of the 3rd volume slightly cracked; paper slightly yellowing) (Note: The Sicilian Greek historian Diodorus Siculus of Agyrium, who was a contemporary of Caesar and Augustus, states, that he spent thirty years collecting material, and writing the 40 books of his History of the World, from the beginning of the world to Caesar's conquest of Gallia, the Bibliothêkê (historikê). The first 7 books concern world history prior to the Trojan war: 1, Egypt; 2, Mesopotamia, India, Scythia, Arabia; 3, Africa; 4/6, Greece and Europe. The books 7/17 deal with the Trojan war, down to the death of Alexander the Great; 18/40 are from the Diadochi to Caesar. Of this work the books 6/10, 21/40 survived fragmentary; fully preserved are 1/5, and 12/20. Heyne states that this great compilation is of the highest importance, on account of the great mass of materials collected from authorities whose works have perished. The editio princeps of the Bibliotheca was published in Basle in 1539. The Amsterdam edition of 1746 of the Dutch/German scholar Peter Wesseling, 1692-1764, with Latin translation and commentary, was long time considered to be authoritative. From the edition of Peter Wesseling have been adopted for this 'editio Bipontina' the Greek text, the Latin translation of Laurentius Rhodomannus, first published in 1603, Wesseling's praefatio, the annotations of Wesseling and various other leading scholars, 65 forged letters of Diodorus, the treatise of Henricus Stephanus 'De Diodoro', and the indices. The errors and omissions of the 1746 edition are 'here corrected and supplied by consulting the ancient editions, and chiefly the editio princeps. This admirable work (this editio Bipontina) will be found to contain various readings from a manuscript in the library of the Elector of Bavaria; also various readings from two Vienna manuscripts, which Wesseling was unable to procure. (...) To make the edition at once complete and commodious, great pains have been taken to reduce into chronological order, and according to the arrangement of the books, the fragments of the lost books'. (Didbin) Original work of this 'editio Bipontina' consists of an important dissertation of the German scholar Christian Gottlob Heyne, 1729-1812, professor at the university of Göttingen since 1763, on the sources of Diodorus (De fontibus et auctoribus historiarum Diodori), several treatises of the German scholar Jeremias Nicolaus Eyring, 1739-1803, who taught also at te university of Göttingen, a useful survey of editions ('notitia literaria editionum), and the 'variae lectiones' from new Viennese manuscripts) (Provenance: From the Rostagni Library. 'The Rostagni private library has been built over a time of 133 years, between 1880 and 2013, by 3 generations of collectors: Augusto Gabinio (1863-1939), internist, his nephew Augusto Rostagni (1892-1961), classical philologist at the University of Turin, and his son Luigi Rostagni (1932), Operational Director. (...) Augusto Rostagni taught ancient literature in various Italian Universities. In 1928 he was appointed professor in Latin literature at the University of Turin, an office he fulfilled until his death in 1961. He became one of Italy's most authorative philologists of the 20th century. He held positions of President of the Turin Institute of Classical Philology, Dean of the Department of Literature and Philosophy, Editor of the Rivista di Filologia Classica, President of the 'Accademia delle Scienze di Torino'. He was a well-known member of many Italian and foreign academies and institutions, amongst them the Accademia dei Lincei. The Department of Philology, Linguistics & Classical Tradition of the University of Turin is named after him.' (Burgersdijk & Niermans, Auction sale 340, Leiden, 2014, p.68) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152316 Euro 540,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Diogenis Laertii De vita et moribus philosophorum libri X. Recens ad exemplar Graecum collati, ex eiusque fide cura doctissimorum virorum restituti & emendati. Cum indice nominum ac rerum locupletissimo. Paris, (Parisiis), Apud Hieronymum de Marnef, sub Pelicano, Monte D. Hilarii, 1560. 12mo. 596,(28 index),(2 epilogue 'Candido Lectori'),(1 woodcut illustration),(1 woodcut printer's mark of De Marnef) p. Later vellum 13 cm - The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Hoffmann 1,569; Graesse 2,397, erroneously dating 1561) (Details: 2 thongs laced through the joints. Woodcut printer's mark of De Marnef on the title (BaTyR no. 28133), depicting a pelican on his nest, feeding his young with his own blood; the motto is: 'In me mors, in me vita'. On the last page another version of De Marnef's printer's mark (BaTyR no. 2882), now depicting a griffon that holds in its claw a cubic weight to which is attached a winged globe. The cube stands for constancy and the globe for fortune; the motto is: 'Virtutis et gloriae, comes invidia'. Marnef used this version of his mark only at the end of the books he printed; This printer's mark very closely resembles that of the Lyonese printer Sébastien Gryphius, only the motto is different. Greek text and a Latin translation.) (Condition: Vellum somewhat age-toned. Short title in ink on the back. Front flyleaf removed. Stamp on front pastedown and on the title; tiny hole in outer margins of title; 4 tiny holes in last leaf; Binder's error: he bound leaf X7, p. 333/4, probably a cancel, before leaf X3) (Note: This is according to Graesse a repetition of the edition of 'De vita et moribus etc.' edited by Johannes Boulierius (Jean Boulier), Lyon 1556. We compared both works and conclude that Graesse is more or less right. The typesetter of the 1560 edition had most probably the 1556 edition before him. He repeats even the printed marginal remarks and annotations. But there are occasionally minute differences in the Greek text, and sometimes the 1560 edition adds an explanatory marginal remark. In book 7 p. 340, in the life of Zeno Criticus for instance, we found a printed 'varia lectio'. There 1556 has only therizonti, 1560 adds in the margin: '* Forte erizonti contentioso'. In 1556 the number 58 is quintaginta & octo, in 1560 Duodesexaginta. (p. 425 & 342) In the epilogue dated 1560, we read that we have here a text revised and ameliorated with the help of a manuscript 'cuius (quamvis mutili) veritate & fide non pauca restituenda, emendandaque curavit Hieronymus Marnefius Parisiensis Typographus'. (Leaf 2Q7). This activity is confirmed in the 'Extrait du Privilège du Roi', which grants Marnefius the exclusive right to publish this text 'Lequel auroit esté nouvelement reveu, visité, corrigé, additionné & augmenté', for the next six years. (Leaf A1 verso, which is the verso of the title) Immediately after this privilege, and preceding the Latin translation, we find a 3 page letter of Fr. Ambrosius addressed to Cosimo de' Medici. This letter is meant to assure the reader that this 1560 translation is a reliable old, and often printed one, based on the translation that was made by the Italian priest, theologian and Hellenist Ambrogio Traversari, O.S.B. Cam., also known as Ambrosius Traversari, or Ambrosius Camaldulensis, 1386-1439. He worked between 1424 and 1433 on this translation, which came to be widely circulated in manuscript form, and was only published in Rome in 1472. In this dedicatory letter Ambrosius Traversari tells us that he translated the 'Lives of the Philosophers' at the request of Cosimo de' Medici. ('Tibi (...) hoc opus dedicatum fuit, qui & autoritate tua in primis nos ad illud impulisti'. p. 5) The 'Lives of the Philosophers' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who probably lived in the first half of the 3rd cent. A.D., is a compendium full of biographies of the ancient philosophers, from Thales to Epicurus, and their doctrines. Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations. His reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 348/49) It 'provides not a systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy (...) of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought'. (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown a green stamp of 'Univ. Doz. Dr. Mag. F.F. Schwarz, Professor. A 8810 Graz, Panoramagasse 2A' with a handwritten date of acquisition '1973'. Franz Ferdinand Schwarz was from 1982 till 1996 professor of classical philology at the University of Graz, where he was born in 1934. He died in his hometown in 2001 after a long illness. (See his wikipedia lemma 'Franz Ferdinand Schwarz') On the title an old almost illegible stamp of the University of Ferrara, showing a tree in its center, and part of the legend 'Università di Ferrara') (Collation: A - 2Q-8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120058 Euro 550,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Diogenis Laertii de vita et moribus philosophorum, libri X. Recens ad fidem Graeci codicis diligenter recogniti. Cum indice locupletissimo. Lyon (Lugduni), Apud Antonium Gryphium, 1592. 16mo. 670,(22 index) p. Vellum 12 cm - The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Hoffmann 1,569; Pettegree/Walsby, French Books III & IV. Books published in France before 1601 in Latin and Languages other than French', Leiden 2011, no. 65100) (Details: Latin translation of Ambrogio Traversari only. Woodcut printer's mark of Gryphius on the title, depicting a griffin, which mythological animal symbolizes courage, diligence, watchfulness, and rapidity of execution, used as a pun of the family name Gryph or Greif (of German origin). The motto is 'Virtute duce / comite fortuna', 'Virtue thy leader, fortune thy comrade', a quote from a letter of Cicero to Plancus (Epistulae ad Familiares, liber X,3). Apart from the title and headings the text is printed completely in italics. Very peculiar is that the first and the last gathering of another Diogenes Laertius edition, both numbering 8 leaves and comprising the title, preface, and the index, was bound before the Gryphius edition. These 2 inserted gatherings are from a Diogenes edition printed by Chouët in 1595: 'Diogenis Laertii de vitis, dogmatis & apophtegmatis eorum qui in philosophia claruerunt libri X'. N.pl., Apud Iacobum Chouët, 1595) (Condition: Backstrip severely damaged, and loosening. Vellum soiled and tanned. Corners bumped. Big ink stain on 3 leaves. Some light waterstains in the gutter of the first gatherings. Lower margin of title expertly repaired. Paper yellowing) (Note: The 'Vitae Philosophorum' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who probably lived in the first half of the 3rd cent. A.D., is a compendium full of biographies of the ancient philosophers, from Thales to Epicurus, and their doctrines. Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations. His reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 348/49) It 'provides not a systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy (...) of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought'. (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) The Latin translation of this 1592 edition of the 'Lives of the Philosophers' was made by the Italian priest, theologian and Hellenist Ambrogio Traversari, O.S.B. Cam., also known as Ambrosius Traversari, or Ambrosius Camaldulensis, 1386-1439. He worked between 1424 and 1433 on this translation, which came to be widely circulated in manuscript form, and was only published in Rome in 1472. The Latin translation is preceded by a dedicatory letter of Traversari to Cosimo de' Medici, in which Traversari tells that he translated the 'Lives of the Philosophers' at his request. (Tibi (...) hoc opus dedicatum fuit, qui & autoritate tua in primis nos ad illud impulisti) (Provenance: On the front pastedown: 'Gruber, 11 Jan. 1819') (Collation: *8, E8 (E6/8 blank), a-z8, A-V8, X2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120057 Euro 380,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Diogenis Laertii De vitis, dogmatis & apophthegmatis clarorum philosophorum libri X. Hesychii ill. De iisdem philos. & de aliis scriptoribus liber. Pythagoreorum philosoph. fragmenta. Is. Casauboni notae ad lib. Diogenis multo auctiores & emendatiores. Eunapii Sardiani De vitis philosophorum & sophistarum liber, cui accesserunt eiusdem auctoris Legationes. Omnia graece & lat. ex editione postrema. Geneva (Coloniae Allobrogum), Apud Joannem Vignon, 1616. 8vo. 16,884;7-88;120;(3 index),(1 blank),47;(25 index),(2 blank) p. Calf 16 cm The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Hoffmann 1,565; Schweiger 1,97; Moss 1,399: 'This edition is very favourably spoken of, and is rare'; Dibdin 1,502; Brunet 2,719; Graesse 2,396; Ebert 6174) (Details: Back with 4 raised bands. Red morocco shield in the second compartment. Boards with double fillet borders. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, it depicts Fama blowing her trumpet; she is surrounded by an oval garland and stands on a globe; she is flanked by two coiling snakes; the motto follows a complicated pattern, but boils down to this: 'Fama perpetuaque gloria comparatur per orbem virtute ac studio'. § The book contains 16 preliminary pages by Henricus Stephanus II, followed by 804 p. with the Greek text and facing Latin translation of Diogenes Laertius, followed by 80 p. with fragments 'ex quorundam Pythagoreorum libris' collected from Stobaeus, 61 p. Greek text with facing Latin translation of Hesychius Milesius' 'De vita quorundam philosophorum', followed by 21 p. notes to Hesychius by Hadrianus Junius and Henricus Stephanus II, then 120 p. 'Isaaci Casauboni notae ad Diogenis Laertii libros', (editio altera & emendatior), and at the end a letter of Ambrosius Traversari and Benedictus Brognolus concerning Diogenes Laertius, and the index. The work of Eunapius that is announced on the title is, as usual, lacking. It was brought on the market separately by Vignon and other Geneva publishers in 1615 and 1616) (Condition: Binding very scuffed, scratched and slightly damaged at the head & tail of the spine; some old notes on the front endpapers. Title finger soiled. Paper yellowing) (Note: The 'Vitae Philosophorum' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who probably lived in the first half of the 3rd cent. A.D., is a compendium full of biographies of the ancient philosophers, from Thales to Epicurus, and their doctrines. Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations. His reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 348/49) It 'provides not a systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy (...) of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought'. (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) § This 1616 edition is a line for line repetition of the Genevan edition of 1615, which in turn was a close reissue of the edition which Henricus Stephanus II published in 1594, also in Geneva. The Latin translation of this edition of the 'Lives of Philosophers' was made by the Italian priest, theologian and Hellenist Ambrogio Traversari, O.S.B. Cam., also known as Ambrosius Traversari, or Ambrosius Camaldulensis, 1386-1439. He worked between 1424 and 1433 on this translation, which came to be widely circulated in manuscript form, and was only published in Rome in 1472. The dedicatory letter of Traversari to Cosimo de' Medici, in which Traversari tells that he translated the 'Lives of the Philosophers' at his request, has been added at the end. The 'lives of philosophers' compiled by the 6th century Greek lexicographer Hesychius were translated into Latin by the Dutch humanist Hadrianus Junius, or in Dutch Adriaen de Jonghe, born in 1511. Added are the notes of the French scholars Henry Estienne II and Isaac Casaubon. Henry Estienne, Henricus Stephanus, 1529-1598, is best known for his complete edition of Plato's dialogues in 1578, and as the creator of the now standard Stephanus pagination of that author. He also corrected and improved the Latin translation of Diogenes Laertius made by Traversari. The learned notes of Casaubon, 1559-1614, had been previously published in 1583, and had been incorporated in the above mentioned 1594 edition of Henry Estienne. The young Dutch scholar Willem Canter, 1542-1575, furnished the Greek text and facing Latin translation of the Pythagorean books. Text and translation were taken from his edition of the Anthology of Stobaeus (5th century A.D) Our 1616 edition was apparantly a coproduction, because there exist copies published in Geneva by Jac. Stoer, Sam. Crispinus, Chouët, and Paul Estienne, who succeeded his father Henry Estienne II) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in pencil: '13 juli 1954', written by the Flemish linguist Walter Couvreur, 1914-1996, who was an Orientalist, and professor of Indoeuropean linguistics at the University of Gent. It indicates the date of aquisition. The place of acquisition he wrote on the flyleaf at the end: 'Amsterdam, illegible'. On the front pastedown in ink 'U. Rohde', and an inscription of 2 lines, of which the second reads 'Stiftsbibliothek 1817', the first line is illegible. On the title the ownership inscription: 'C.F. Semleri'. Who this Semler was we couldnot find out) (Collation: q8, A-3I8, 3K4, 3L-4D8, 4E4 (leaf 3E4 blank) (leaves Z7 & Z8 blank, left out in the pagination) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120237 Euro 375,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Kort Begrijp van Diogenes Laërtius zijnde het Leven, heerlijke Spreuken, loffelijke Daden, en snedige Antwoorden der oude Philosophen: waar by komen eenige treffelijke spreuken en gelykenissen: uyt verscheyden heydensche en andere schryvers. By-een-gebragt door P(aschier) D(e) F(ijne). Tot Rotterdam, By Joannes Naeranus, 1655. 12mo. (XXIV),407,(1 blank) p., frontispiece. Vellum 13.5 cm The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Geerebaert 31,1: first translation into Dutch; OiN. 164: 'reeks fragm.'; Sub Rosa 6254) (Details: 5 thongs laced through cover. Engraved frontispiece, depicting a gathering of philosophers, and the meeting between Alexander the Great and the philosopher Diogenes) (Condition: Vellum worn and soiled. Small piece of the back (halfway left) gone. Name on the upper margin of the frontispiece and on the title page. Upper corner of the frontispiece expertly and almost invisibly repaired. Lower half of the first 2 gatherings (ca. 50 p.) slightly waterstained) (Note: This book offers an anthology (kort begrijp) of the 'Vitae Philosophorum' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who probably lived in the first half of the 3rd cent. A.D. The 'Vitae Philosophorum' is a compendium full of biographies of the ancient philosophers, from Thales to Epicurus, and their doctrines. Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations. His reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 348/49.) The excerpts from Diogenes fill the first 110 pages, in the rest of the book we find edifying proverbs and the like from other ancient sources, from Plato to Eusebius, followed by a collection of similes taken from unknown sources. Added is also a summary of 21 p. of the philosophy of the Roman poet Lucretius. At the end we find a bonus, 17 p. filled with wise and devote proverbs and sayings of Islamic heathens, 'welke in deugdsame werken en treffelijke Leeringen, de Christenen niet en schijnen te wijken' (Preface *3 verso). The translation of Diogenes, here translated for the first time into Dutch, and the other collections are from the hand of the Dutch protestant minister Paschier de Fijne, 1588-1667. He wrote a number of books and lively pamphlets against the Calvinists to defend the branch of the 'Remonstrantse Broederschap'. In the preface De Fijne explains why he excerpted Diogenes, and did not translate the whole work. In the first place the 'Lives' are not interesting enough for devote christians, and in the second place they contain dangerous thoughts, 'om datter dingen in sijn ende van haar verhaald werden, die beter nooyt gedacht dan gedaan waren; en waar mede de meeste ende de geleerste besmet sijn geweest, selfs die de Beste Spreuken gesproken hebben.' (Preface *4)) (Provenance: Name on the blank upper margin of the frontispiece of one 'Petrus v. Meeuwen', 20th century hand. A small stamp on the title 'B.V' Munnich', probably short for B. van Munnich) (Collation: *12, A-R12 (R12 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120059 Euro 325,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Kort Begrijp van Diogenes Laërtius zijnde het Leven, heerlijke Spreuken, loffelijke Daden, en snedige Antwoorden der oude Philosophen: waar by komen eenige treffelijke spreuken en gelykenissen: uyt verscheyden heydensche en andere schryvers. By-een-gebragt door P(aschier) D(e) F(ijne). Tot Rotterdam, By Joannes Naeranus, 1655. 12mo (XXIV),407,(1 blank) p., frontispiece. Vellum 13 cm The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Geerebaert 31,1: first translation into Dutch; OiN. 164: 'reeks fragm.'; Sub Rosa 6254) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the cover. Engraved frontispiece, which depicts a gathering of philosophers, and the meeting between Alexander the Great and the philosopher Diogenes) (Condition: Vellum soiled & spotted, showing a real patina of age. The frontispiece has been reattached to the title in the gutter with a strip of paper. The left blank margin of the frontispiece is gone, the other edges of the frontispiece are thumbed and slightly chafed. Small wormhole in the gutter of the last 110 p. Tiny pinpoint wormhole in left upper corner. Lower margins a bit narrow) (Note: This book offers an anthology (kort begrijp) of the 'Vitae Philosophorum' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who probably lived in the first half of the 3rd cent. A.D. The 'Vitae Philosophorum' is a compendium full of biographies of the ancient philosophers, from Thales to Epicurus, and their doctrines. Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations. His reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 348/49.) The excerpts from Diogenes fill the first 110 pages, in the rest of the book we find edifying proverbs and the like from other ancient sources, from Plato to Eusebius, followed by a collection of similes taken from unknown sources. Added is also a summary of 21 p. of the thoughts of Lucretius. At the end we find a bonus, 17 p. filled with wise and devote proverbs and sayings of Islamic heathens 'welke in deugdsame werken en treffelijke Leeringen, de Christenen niet en schijnen te wijken' (Preface *3 verso). The translation of Diogenes, here translated for the first time into Dutch, and the other collections are from the hand of the Dutch protestant minister Paschier de Fijne, 1588-1667. He wrote a number of books and lively pamphlets against the Calvinists to defend the branch of the 'Remonstrantse Broederschap'. In the preface De Fijne explains why he excerpted Diogenes, and did not translate the whole work. In the first place the 'Lives' were not interesting enough for devote christians, and in the second place they contained dangerous thoughts, 'om datter dingen in sijn ende van haar verhaald werden, die beter nooyt gedacht dan gedaan waren; en waar mede de meeste ende de geleerste besmet sijn geweest, selfs die de Beste Spreuken gesproken hebben.' (Preface *4)) (Provenance: Small name on front pastedown of 'H. de Koning') (Collation: *12, A-R12 (R12 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120442 Euro 200,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. LAERTIOU DIOGENOUS PERI BIÔN DOGMATÔN KAI APOPHTHEGMATÔN TÔN EN PHILOSOPHIA EUDOKIMÊSANTÔN BIBLIA I'. Laertii Diogenis De vitis dogmatis et apophthegmatis eorum qui in philosophia claruerunt, libri X. Thoma Aldobrandino interprete, cum annotationibus ejusdem. Quibus accesserunt annotationes H. Stephani, & utriusque Casauboni, cum uberrimis Aegidii Menagii observationibus. London, (Londini), Impensis Octaviani Pulleyn, typis Tho. Ratcliffe, 1664. Folio. (XLVII, including the indices),(1 blank),3,(1 blank),303,(1 blank),(4),151,(1 blank),283,(1 blank),18,(1 errata),(1 blank) (4),26,(16) p. Vellum 35.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,565/66, offers a long list of the contents; Moss 1,399/400: 'A very rare and good edition'; Dibdin 1,502/03: 'splendid work'; Brunet 2,719/20; Graesse 2,396; Ebert 6175) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands. Boards blind tooled. The second 'A gathering' has been bound at the wrong place, it should preceed the gatherings 'B-2Q4', which gatherings offer the observations and emendations of Menagius. The indices are also at the wrong place, they have been bound at the end of the preliminary leaves. This book does contain however at the end the often lacking 16 pages with the 'Auctarium addendorum et mutandorum in observationibus Aegidii Menagii in Diogenem Laertium', which 16 pages also include the 'errata typographica') (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Back rubbed. Corners bumped. Vellum curling loose at the edges. Front flyleaf partly detached) (Note: The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity The 'Lives and Doctrines of the Philosophers' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who lived probably in the first half of the third century A.D., is still 'our best indirect source of knowledge for classical philosophy'. The 'Lives' comprises both a biographical and a doxographical account, basically focused on Greek thinkers from the 6th to the 3rd century B.C. (from Thales to Epicurus), although references to schools and individuals extend to at least the 2nd century A.D.' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 271) Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations, and his doxographic account offers long excerpts from primary texts not transmitted elsewhere, for example Epicurus' 'Principal Doctrines'. Diogenes' reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. His approach is not a 'systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy, and of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists, like Leonardo Bruni, Machiavelli, Erasmus et alii, some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought.' (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) § The 'editio princeps' of Diogenes Laertius was published in Basel in 1533. This 1664 edition is based on the edition which was published in Rome in 1594 by the Italian scholar Thomas Aldobrandini, brother of Pope Clemens VIII. Under Pope Pius V he was 'Secretary of Briefs to Princes and of Latin Letters' of the Roman Curia. He died young, before he could finish his Latin translation of Diogenes Laertius, and complete and polish his notes. His version and notes do not extend beyond the 'Life of Leucippus' in the ninth book. His cousin, the Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini completed the work and superintended its publication. Thomas Aldobrandini's Greek text and Latin translation were praised by the Diogenes' specialists Isaac and Meric Casaubon. His notes were incorporated in all later editions of Diogenes Laertius. This 1664 edition contains besides the Greek text and Latin translation of Aldobrandini (331 p.), the annotations of the French scholars Henricus Stephanus II, and Isaac Casaubon (58 p.), of Aldobrandini (92 p.), and of Meric Casaubon (16 p.), and the elaborate and learned commentary of the French scholar Giles de Ménage of Angers, or Aegidius Menagius (283 p.). Menagius, 1613-1692, was a parliamentary barrister and later became prior of Mont-Didier. He published a discourse on the Heautontimorumenos of Terentius and notes on Lucianus. Among classicists he is known for his notes on Diogenes Laertius, and among the specialists in gender studies as the author of the 'Historia Mulierum Philosopharum' (see below). This 1664 edition of Diogenes Laertius was published under the inspection of the English scholar and bishop John Pearson. Menagius worked for years on his commentary, but he had to abandon this project on the advice of his medicin, because of his bad health. A great part of it perished through the negligence of his secretary. When however the rumour reached England that Menagius had been compiling a huge commentary, the London publisher Pulleyn, wanting to publish a Diogenes edition, urged him to finish what he had begun. ('Pulleynus, repetitis litteris illum commovit, ut manum denuo admoveret telae, quam texere coeperat', Moss 1,400). Menagius put his hand once again on the plough and had printed in 1662 in Paris at his own cost a few copies of his commentary, which he sent to Bishop John Pearson for publication. § Menagius published in 1690 his 'Historia Mulierum Philosopharum'. He already had a 'soft' reputation, because he was ridiculed by Molière in his 'Femmes Savantes' (1672), where he appears as Vadius. For those involved in gender studies we quote the abstract of an article of professor Richard Maber: 'The late work of Gilles Ménage (1613-1692), 'Historia mulierum philosopharum' (1690), is a compilation of all the information that he could gather concerning women philosophers from earliest antiquity to the fourteenth century. It made little impact when first published, but is currently the subject of renewed interest in the context of women's studies, with recent translations into English, French, Italian, and Spanish. However the work's true importance is much greater than has been realised. Ménage included it, as he had always intended, in his monumental and definitive edition of Diogenes Laertius's Lives of the Philosophers (1692), the greatest known source of information about the (male) philosophers of antiquity. Ménage's Historia thus became a supplement, and corrective, to Diogenes Laertius, and was included with subsequent editions and translations of the irreplaceable Greek text. In this way, the reality of women's capacity for the highest intellectual achievement was incontrovertibly established, and women were integrated into the mainstream of the history of philosophy. An analysis (...) demonstrates how, thanks explicitly to Ménage's work, the role of women was now seen as crucial to modern intellectual life'. (Maber, Richard G. (2010). Re-Gendering Intellectual Life: Gilles Ménage and his Histoire des femmes philosophes. Seventeenth-Century French Studies 32(1): 45-60)) (Provenance: On the verso of the front flyleaf: 'Jun 1774, Ambr. Dorhout'. Ambrosius Dorhout, born in the Frisian capital Leeuwarden in 1699, died in Dokkum in 1776. He studied theology and was appointed minister in several small cities. From 1745 he was active in Dokkum. (DBNL 3,295)) (Collation: A4, A4, *4, (a)4, (b)2, *+*6 (leaf *+*6 verso blank); A-2 (leaf A2 verso blank), A-2A6, 2B8,(leaf 2B8 verso blank); B-V4, X2 (leaf X2 verso blank); B-2Q4 (leaf 2O & 2Q4 verso blank); A-C4, D4 (minus leaf D4); *-4*2) (The Indices, which should be at the end, have been bound at the end of the preliminary leaves. The second 'A gathering' of this book has been bound at the wrong place, it should preceed the gatherings 'B-2Q4', which gatherings offer the observations and emendations of Menagius) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 066577 Euro 550,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Diogenis Laertii De vitis, dogmatibus et apophthegmatibus clarorum philosophorum libri X. Graece et Latine. Cum subjunctis integris annotationibus Is. Casauboni, Th. Aldobrandini & Mer. Casauboni. Latinam Ambrosii versionem complevit & emendavit Marcus Meibomius. Seorsum excusas Aeg. Menagii in Diogenem Observationes auctiores habet volumen II. Ut & ejusdem Syntagma de mulieribus philosophis; et Joachimi Kühnii ad Diogenem notas. Additae denique sunt priorum editionum praefationes, & indices locupletissimi. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Henricum Wetstenium, 1692. 4to. 2 volumes: (XVI, including the frontispiece),672;(8),590,(55)(1 blank) p., 25 plates. Vellum 26.5 cm § By far the best edition (Ref: Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 204; Hoffmann 1,566; Brunet 2,720: 'Édition la plus complète et la plus belle'; Ebert 6176; Graesse 2,396; Moss 1,400/01: 'excellent edition, exhibiting the most correct and critical revision'; Dibdin 1,503/04: 'most perfect edition. (...), by far the best edition'. The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 272) (Details: Back with 6 raised bands. Brown morocco shield in the second compartment. Boards with blind double and triple fillets. Engraved frontispiece, depicting a bunch of philosophers, including Pythagoras and the cynic Diogenes, who are discussing in the court of a kind of 'temple of wisdom'; in the left corner sits Diogenes Laertius, writing his account. § Both titles in red and black. Engraved printer's device on the title: a burin being sharpened on a whetstone (Wetstein!); around it the device: 'Terar dum prosim'; this scene is flanked by a standing Hermes and Athena. 25 full page plates with beautiful engraved portraits of the ancient Greek philosophers Thales, Solon, Pittacus, Anacharsis, Socrates, Aeschines, Aristippus, Euclides, Plato, Xenocrates, Carneades, Aristoteles, Theophrastus, Antisthenes, Diogenes, Monimus, Chrysippus, Pythagoras, Archytas, Heraclitus, Zeno, Democritus, Sextus Empiricus, Epicurus, and in the chapter on Cleobulus a portrait of a 'Aenea virgo', a bust with a sunny side and a dark, lunar, side) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Backs slightly soiled. The front joint of the first volume is cracked for 7 cm at the head of the spine. Pinpoint wormhole in the blank lower margin of the first 176 pages of the first volume, not coming near the text. Small and faint stain at the uppermargin of the first 2 gatherings. Paper slightly yellowing) (Note: The 'Lives and Doctrines of the Philosophers' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who lived probably in the first half of the third century A.D., is still 'our best indirect source of knowledge for classical philosophy'. The 'Lives' comprises both a biographical and a doxographical account, basically focused on Greek thinkers from the 6th to the 3rd century B.C. (from Thales to Epicurus), although references to schools and individuals extend to at least the 2nd century A.D.' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 271) Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations, and his doxographic account offers long excerpts from primary texts not transmitted elsewhere, for example Epicurus' 'Principal Doctrines'. Diogenes' reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. His approach is not a 'systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy, and of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists, like Leonardo Bruni, Machiavelli, Erasmus et alii, some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought.' (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) § The 'editio princeps' was published in Basel in 1533. The Latin translation was published much earlier in Rome in 1472. This translation, also appearing in this book, was made by the Italian priest, theologian and leading Hellenist of his time Ambrogio Traversari, O.S.B. Cam., also known as Ambrosius Traversari, or Ambrosius Camaldulensis, 1386-1439. He was an exponent of the new humanism which was growing up within the church. This 1692 edition was produced by the Danish philologist Marcus Meibom, or Marcus Meibomius, born in 1630 in Tönning in Schleswig-Holstein. He was a scholar with a bad temper and a lot of ennemies. After a turbulent life he died poor in Utrecht in 1710 or 1711. He was one of those colourful people who, despite numerous initiatives, was unable to ascend in the Republic of Letters. Meibom treated everyone crudely and could never restrain his arrogance. The Dutch gentleman/scholar Nicolaas Heinsius called him a 'hungry rogue' and an 'ungrateful person'. He was made royal librarian and professor at Uppsala in 1654. In 1668 he accepted a position at the Athenaeum Illustre at Amsterdam. One year later, in 1670, he was fired. Modesty and humility were not his strongest points. § The first volume of this 1692 edition 'contains the (Greek) text of the author on the basis of the Roman edition of 1594, divided into sections, and amended by Meibomius from former editions, and a Cambridge and an Arundelian MS.; the text is succeeded by the Latin version of Ambrosius, but so greatly improved and corrected by the present editor, that it may be justly called a 'new one'. To each page are added the entire notes of Stephen (Henry Estienne), both the Casaubons, Aldobrandini, and the unpublished ones of Meibomius; (...) The second volume contains the long and learned annotations of Ménage (Aegidius Menagius, or Giles Ménage of Angers, 1613-1692) and his 'Historia Mulierum Philosopharum' (...) To these succeed some very learned notes of Kuhnius, never before published, in which great light is thrown on many passages of Laertius; then follow some various readings from the Cambridge and Arundelian MS. collated with great care by Gale. (...) Beyond all doubt, however, this is by far the best, as well as the most splendid, edition extant of the author.' (Dibdin) § Of special interest is the section with short biographies of ancient women philosophers, produced by the French scholar Aegidius Menagius. We quote concerning this section the abstract of an article of professor Richard Maber: 'The late work of Gilles Ménage (1613-1692), 'Historia mulierum philosopharum' (1690), is a compilation of all the information that he could gather concerning women philosophers from earliest antiquity to the fourteenth century. It made little impact when first published, but is currently the subject of renewed interest in the context of women's studies, with recent translations into English, French, Italian, and Spanish. However the work's true importance is much greater than has been realised. Ménage included it, as he had always intended, in his monumental and definitive edition of Diogenes Laertius's Lives of the Philosophers (1692), the greatest known source of information about the (male) philosophers of antiquity. Ménage's Historia thus became a supplement, and corrective, to Diogenes Laertius, and was included with subsequent editions and translations of the irreplaceable Greek text. In this way, the reality of women's capacity for the highest intellectual achievement was incontrovertibly established, and women were integrated into the mainstream of the history of philosophy. An analysis (...) demonstrates how, thanks explicitly to Ménage's work, the role of women was now seen as crucial to modern intellectual life'. (Maber, Richard G. (2010). Re-Gendering Intellectual Life: Gilles Ménage and his Histoire des femmes philosophes. Seventeenth-Century French Studies 32(1): 45-60)) (Collation: Volume 1: *-2*4; A-4P4. Volume 2: *-4, a-4m4 (leaf 4m3 verso blank; leaf 4m4 blank); plates at p. 14, thales (at p. 44), 26 solon, 46 pittacus, 56 'aenea virgo', 64 anacharsis, 90 socrates, 115 aeschines, 118 aristippus, 141 euclides, 163 plato, 230 xenocrates, 263 carneades, 268 aristoteles, 288 theophrastus, 317 antisthenes, 325 diogenes, 353 monimus, 477 chrysippus, 487 pythagoras, 540 archytas, 548 heraclitus, 564 zeno, 569 democritus, 602 sextus empiricus, 603 epicurus) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140091 Euro 825,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Diogenis Laertii De vitis, dogmatibus et apophthegmatibus clarorum philosophorum libri X. Graece et Latine. Cum subjunctis integris annotationibus Is. Casauboni, Th. Aldobrandini & Mer. Casauboni. Latinam Ambrosii versionem complevit & emendavit Marcus Meibomius. Seorsum excusas Aeg. Menagii In Diogenem observationes auctiores habet volumen II. Ut & ejusdem syntagma de mulieribus philosophis; et Joachimi Kühnii ad Diogenem notas. Additae denique sunt priorum editionum praefationes, & indices locupletissimi. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Henricum Wetstenium, 1692. 4to. 2 volumes: (XVI, including the frontispiece),672;(VIII),590,(55 index)(1 blank) p.; 25 engraved plates. 20th century dull and coarse sackcloth (burlap) 26.5 cm The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 204; Hoffmann 1,566; Brunet 2,720: 'Édition la plus complète et la plus belle'; Ebert 6176; Graesse 2,396; Moss 1,400/01: 'excellent edition, exhibiting the most correct and critical revision'; Dibdin 1,503/04: 'most perfect edition. (...), by far the best edition'. The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 272) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands. Engraved frontispiece, depicting a bunch of philosophers, including Pythagoras and the cynic Diogenes, who are discussing in the court of a kind of 'temple of wisdom'; in the left corner sits Diogenes Laertius, writing his account. § Both titles in red and black. Engraved printer's device on the title: a burin being sharpened on a whetstone (Wetstein!); around it the device: 'Terar dum prosim'; this scene is flanked by a standing Hermes and Athena. Brunet and Hoffmann call for 24 plates, our copy has 25 plates: Thales, Solon, Pittacus, Anacharsis, Socrates, Aeschines, Aristippus, Euclides, Plato, Xenocrates, Carneades, Aristoteles, Theophrastus, Antisthenes, Diogenes, Monimus, Chrysippus, Pythagoras, Archytas, Heraclitus, Zeno, Democritus, Sextus Empiricus, Epicurus and at p. 56 'Aenea Virgo') (Condition: The original leather binding has been covered with coarse sackcloth; this cheap solution has the advantage that the binding is strong and sturdy. The front hinges are cracking, but strong. The front flyleaf of the first volume removed. Frontispiece slightly worn and browning, its edges are worn. Manuscript ownership inscription on the title. The edges of the second title are slightly browned. Paper slightly yellowing. Some faint foxing) (Note: The 'Lives and Doctrines of the Philosophers' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who lived probably in the first half of the third century A.D., is still 'our best indirect source of knowledge for classical philosophy'. The 'Lives' comprises both a biographical and a doxographical account, basically focused on Greek thinkers from the 6th to the 3rd century B.C. (from Thales to Epicurus), although references to schools and individuals extend to at least the 2nd century A.D.' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 271) Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations, and his doxographic account offers long excerpts from primary texts not transmitted elsewhere, for example Epicurus' 'Principal Doctrines'. Diogenes' reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. His approach is not a 'systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy, and of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists, like Leonardo Bruni, Machiavelli, Erasmus et alii, some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought.' (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) § The 'editio princeps' was published in Basel in 1533. The Latin translation was published much earlier in Rome in 1472. This translation, also appearing in this book, was made by the Italian priest, theologian and leading Hellenist of his time Ambrogio Traversari, O.S.B. Cam., also known as Ambrosius Traversari, or Ambrosius Camaldulensis, 1386-1439. He was an exponent of the new humanism which was growing up within the church. This 1692 edition was produced by The Danish philologist Marcus Meibom, or Marcus Meibomius, born in 1630 in Tönning in Schleswig-Holstein. He was a scholar with a bad temper and a lot of ennemies. After a turbulent life he died poor in Utrecht in 1710 or 1711. He was one of those colourful people who, despite numerous initiatives, was unable to ascend in the Republic of Letters. Meibom treated everyone crudely and could never restrain his arrogance. The Dutch gentleman/scholar Nicolaas Heinsius called him a 'hungry rogue' and an 'ungrateful person'. He was made royal librarian and professor at Uppsala in 1654. In 1668 he accepted a position at the Athenaeum Illustre at Amsterdam. One year later, in 1670, he was fired. Modesty and humility were not his strongest points. § The first volume of this 1692 edition 'contains the (Greek) text of the author on the basis of the Roman edition of 1594, divided into sections, and amended by Meibomius from former editions, and a Cambridge and an Arundelian MS.; the text is succeeded by the Latin version of Ambrosius, but so greatly improved and corrected by the present editor, that it may be justly called a 'new one'. To each page are added the entire notes of Stephen (Henry Estienne), both the Casaubons, Aldobrandini, and the unpublished ones of Meibomius; (...) The second volume contains the long and learned annotations of Ménage (Aegidius Menagius, or Giles Ménage of Angers, 1613-1692) and his 'Historia Mulierum Philosopharum' (...) To these succeed some very learned notes of Kuhnius, never before published, in which great light is thrown on many passages of Laertius; then follow some various readings from the Cambridge and Arundelian MS. collated with great care by Gale. (...) Beyond all doubt, however, this is by far the best, as well as the most splendid, edition extant of the author.' (Dibdin). This is the first illustrated edition of Diogenes Laertius. It has 25 beautiful full page portraits of famous Greek philosophers, and in the chapter on Cleobulus a fancy portrait of a 'Aenea virgo', a bust with a sunny side and a dark, lunar, side. In the praefatio H. Wetstenius explains that he produced on the advice of Meibomius a text free from ligatures. § Of special interest is the section with short biographies of ancient women philosophers, produced by the French scholar Aegidius Menagius. We quote concerning this section the abstract of an article of professor Richard Maber: 'The late work of Gilles Ménage (1613-1692), 'Historia mulierum philosopharum' (1690), is a compilation of all the information that he could gather concerning women philosophers from earliest antiquity to the fourteenth century. It made little impact when first published, but is currently the subject of renewed interest in the context of women's studies, with recent translations into English, French, Italian, and Spanish. However the work's true importance is much greater than has been realised. Ménage included it, as he had always intended, in his monumental and definitive edition of Diogenes Laertius's Lives of the Philosophers (1692), the greatest known source of information about the (male) philosophers of antiquity. Ménage's Historia thus became a supplement, and corrective, to Diogenes Laertius, and was included with subsequent editions and translations of the irreplaceable Greek text. In this way, the reality of women's capacity for the highest intellectual achievement was incontrovertibly established, and women were integrated into the mainstream of the history of philosophy. An analysis (...) demonstrates how, thanks explicitly to Ménage's work, the role of women was now seen as crucial to modern intellectual life'. (Maber, Richard G. (2010). Re-Gendering Intellectual Life: Gilles Ménage and his Histoire des femmes philosophes. Seventeenth-Century French Studies 32(1): 45-60)) (Provenance: On the titles the name of 'J.H. Wieten'. One Jan Hermannus Wieten published in 1915 his Leiden dissertation 'De tribus laminis aureis quae in sepulcris Thurinis sunt inventae' (Amsterdam, 1915) Walter Burkert calls this dissertation still fundamental. (W. Burkert, 'Greek Religion, archaic and classical', (Oxford, 1985, p. 461). In 1912 Wieten taught Latin and Greek at the 'Gereformeerd gymnasium' at Arnhem. His dissertation is cited by all the great names in the field of ancient religion, Burkert, Nilsson, Zuntz, Cook) (Collation: 1: *-2*4; a-4p4; 2: *4, a-4m4 (leaf 4m3 verso blank; 4m4 blank); plates at p. 14, 26, 46, 56 aenea virgo, 64, 90, 115, 118, 141, 163, 230, 263, 268, 288, 317, 325, 353, 477, 487, 548, 550, 564, 569, 602, 603) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140003 Euro 300,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Diogenis Laertii De vitis, dogmatibus et apophthegmatibus clarorum philosophorum libri decem, graece et latine. Leipzig (Lipsiae), Impensis Ioannis Pauli Krausii, Bibliop. Viennens., 1759. (Colophon at the end: 'Lipsiae, Ex officina I.G.I. Breitkopfii') 8vo. (XIV),756 (recte 736),(94 index) p. Contemporary calf. 19.5 cm The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Hoffmann 1,566; Dibdin 1,504; Moss 1,400/01; Brunet 2,720; Graesse 2,396; Ebert 6177) (Details: Printed in 2 colums, Greek text with facing Latin translation) (Condition: Binding scuffed & chafed, especially at the extremes. Back & boards rubbed. Paper foxing, yellowing and occasionally browning. Right upper corner of the last 80 p. is slightly waterstained. Some small and old ink annotations and underlinings) (Note: The 'Lives and Doctrines of the Philosophers' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who lived probably in the first half of the third century A.D., is still 'our best indirect source of knowledge for classical philosophy'. The 'Lives' comprises both a biographical and a doxographical account, basically focused on Greek thinkers from the 6th to the 3rd century B.C. (from Thales to Epicurus), although references to schools and individuals extend to at least the 2nd century A.D.' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 271) Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations, and his doxographic account offers long excerpts from primary texts not transmitted elsewhere, for example Epicurus' 'Principal Doctrines'. Diogenes' reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. His approach is not a 'systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy, and of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists, like Leonardo Bruni, Machiavelli, Erasmus et alii, some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought.' (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) § The 'editio princeps' was published in Basel in 1533. The Latin translation was published much earlier in Rome in 1472. This translation was later revised several times and appears also in this book. It was made by the Italian Hellenist Ambrogio Traversari, also known as Ambrosius Traversari, 1386-1439. Our 1759 edition is a reissue of the edition of 1731 of Longolius, which in turn was a revision of the 1692 edition, which was produced by the Danish philologist Marcus Meibom, or Marcus Meibomius. The edition of 1731 was produced by the German philologist and historian Paulus Daniel Longolius, 1704-1779, from 1735 till his death Rector of the Gymnasium in Hof. He wrote on local history and was an editor of Zedler's Universallexikon. He also published three texts of classical authors: 'Plinii epistolae' (Amsterdam 1734), this Diogenes edition (Curiae, i.e. Hof, Saale, 1739), and a Gellius edition (Curiae, 1741). (ADB 19, 156/57) The 1731 edition contained, besides the Greek text and Latin translation, a preface, commentaries and engraved portraits. Because this edition was out of print, and there was much demand for it, the publisher Paulus Krausius decided to produce this Leipsic edition of 1759, which is in fact a reissue of the 1731 edition of Longolius, omitting however the portraits, the preface and the commentaries, and offering the Greek text , the Latin translation, and 94 pages of indexes. (Praefatio leaf *5 verso and *6 recto) (Provenance: on the front flyleaf in pencil 'RtK', this is Rijkel ten Kate 1918-2008. He taught classics at the Willem Lodewijk Gymnasium in Groningen. In 1955 he wrote his dissertation: ’Quomodo heroes in Statii Thebaide describantur quaeritur’, on the Thebaid of the Roman poet Statius)(Collation: *8 (minus leaf *8), A-3F8 (minus leaf 3F8); the pagination jumps between the gatherings 2Y and 2Z from 721 to 741, the catchword on leaf 2Y4 verso is correct) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130315 Euro 200,00
DIOGENES LAERTIUS. Les vies des plus illustres philosophes de l'antiquité, avec leurs dogmes, leurs systêmes, leur morale, & leurs sentences les plus remarquables. Traduites du grec de Diogène Laerce (by J.-G. Chauffepié). Auxquelles on a ajouté la Vie de l'auteur, celles d'Epictète, de Confucius, & leur morale; & un abrégé historique de la vie des femmes philosophes de l'antiquité. Nouvelle édition. Paris, Chez Richard, Libraire, rue de la Harpe, 1796. 8vo. 2 volumes: XXXII,507,(1 blank); 535,(1) p. Calf 20 cm The greatest known source of information about the philosophers of antiquity (Ref: Hoffmann 1,570; Brunet 2,721; cf. Cioranescu 18849; Graesse 2,397; Ebert 6185) (Details: Backs ruled gilt, and with a shield. Marbled endpapers. Edges dyed red) (Condition: Backs very rubbed. Back of volume 1 cracked. Joints cracking, but still strong. Head of the spines worn away. Partly foxed. Some inkstains. Two labels on the front pastedown) (Note: The 'Lives and Doctrines of the Philosophers' of the Greek author Diogenes Laertius, who lived probably in the first half of the third century A.D., is still 'our best indirect source of knowledge for classical philosophy'. The 'Lives' comprises both a biographical and a doxographical account, basically focused on Greek thinkers from the 6th to the 3rd century B.C. (from Thales to Epicurus), although references to schools and individuals extend to at least the 2nd century A.D.' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 271) Diogenes Laertius drew his material from earlier compilations, and his doxographic account offers long excerpts from primary texts not transmitted elsewhere, for example Epicurus' 'Principal Doctrines'. Diogenes' reliability and value differ from passage to passage. Some give invaluable information, other passages offer mere caricature. His approach is not a 'systematic analysis, but rather a eulogistic narrative of the course of ancient philosophy, and of the four main classical schools, the Academy, Peripatetics, Stoics and Epicureans. Anecdotal and perhaps largely apocryphal in nature, still it gave to Renaissance humanists, like Leonardo Bruni, Machiavelli, Erasmus et alii, some conception of ancient philosophy, especially of Platonic and Epicurean thought.' (Ch.L. Stinger, 'Humanism and the Church Fathers: Ambrogio Traversari (1386-1439) and Christian antiquity in the Italian Renaissance', Albany 1977, p. 71) To the second volume has been added a 75 page biography of Confucius and, of special interest, 90 pages with short biographies of ancient women philosophers. This section, a translation of 'Historia Mulierum Philosopharum' was taken and translated from the authoritative Diogenes Laertius edition of the French scholar Aegidius Menagius, or Giles Ménage, of 1692. We quote concerning this section the abstract of an article of professor Richard Maber: 'The late work of Gilles Ménage (1613-1692), 'Historia mulierum philosopharum' (1690), is a compilation of all the information that he could gather concerning women philosophers from earliest antiquity to the fourteenth century. It made little impact when first published, but is currently the subject of renewed interest in the context of women's studies, with recent translations into English, French, Italian, and Spanish. However the work's true importance is much greater than has been realised. Ménage included it, as he had always intended, in his monumental and definitive edition of Diogenes Laertius's Lives of the Philosophers (1692), the greatest known source of information about the (male) philosophers of antiquity. Ménage's 'Historia' thus became a supplement, and corrective, to Diogenes Laertius, and was included with subsequent editions and translations of the irreplaceable Greek text. In this way, the reality of women's capacity for the highest intellectual achievement was incontrovertibly established, and women were integrated into the mainstream of the history of philosophy. An analysis of the frontispieces to the three volumes of Chauffepié's translation of Diogenes (1758) demonstrates how, thanks explicitly to Ménage's work, the role of women was now seen as crucial to modern intellectual life'. (Richard G. Maber (2010), 'Re-Gendering Intellectual Life: Gilles Ménage and his Histoire des femmes philosophes', Seventeenth-Century French Studies 32(1): 45-60) This French translation of Diogenes Laertius and of the 'Historia Mulierum Philosopharum' of Ménage is attributed to Jacques-Georges Chauffepié, a calvinist minister of the Walloon Church, of French origin, born in Leeuwarden in 1702. He preached in Flushing, Delft and Amsterdam, where he died in 1766. It was first published in Amsterdam in 1758. (NNBW 4,417/18, and Wikipédia 'Jacques-Georges Chauffepié', with a wrong date of his death) (Provenance: Two old labels of booksellers on the front pastedown: one of 'Libreria Puvill, libros antiguos. Boters, 10-Barcelona-2, España' & one older one: 'Vendese en la Libreria de Josef Cerqueda, calle de la Boearia, en Barcelona'. 'Puvill libros, librería técnica SA' still exists. Josef Cerqueda was active at the beginning of the 19th century) (Collation: a-b8; A-2H8, 2I6; A-2K8, 2L4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130238 Euro 150,00
EMMIUS,U. Graecorum Respubliae, ab Ubbone Emmio descriptae. Leiden (Lugd. Batavorum), Ex officina Elzeviriana, 1632. 24mo. 2 parts in 1: 426,(6 index);323,(7 index & privilegium) p. Calf 11.5 cm (Ref: Willems 364; Berghman 1573; Rahir 345; Ebert 6690) (Details: Back and boards with blind tripple fillet borders. Title engraved by C.C.D(uysend), it depicts around the text of the title a floral cartouche, on top of which rests an eagle (aquila) with spread wings, holding in its talons the deadly thunderbolts (fulmina) of Jupiter. The eagle was called by Aristotle for the lordly manner with which it looked over the earth 'divine among birds'. (HA 619b.6) The eagle is flanked by an owl (wisdom) and two 'kissing' pigeons. The second part has its own title, on it a woodcut printer's mark featuring an old man who stands in the shade of a vine-entwined elmtree, symbolising the symbiotic relationship between scholar and publisher. The motto is enigmatic: 'Non solus' , probably indicating the interdependency of publisher and scholar. They cannot do it alone, and need each other) (Condition: Binding scuffed, corners bumped. Endpapers detached) (Note: Ubbo Emmius, 1547-1625, born in Eastern Friesland was appointed professor of History and Greek literature at the newly established University of Groningen in 1614, where he became also the first Rector Magnificus. In his publications and correspondence with eminent scholars of his time, he defended the right of a people to revolt, an idea that would eventually lead to the French revolution. In the Netherlands he is best known for his Rerum Frisicarum Historia, 1592-1616, the first modern study of Friesland and the Frisians, in which he refuted many idle tales related by earlier historians of Friesland. Among classicists and ancient historians he is known for his 'Vetus Graecia illustrata', a three volume work which he composed during the last years of his life, and which was published posthumously in Leiden in 1626 by the Elzevier brothers. The third volume, which describes the particular form of government of every state or commonwealth of Greece, was published in 1632 separately by Elsevier as 'Graecorum Respublicae') (Provenance: In the center of the upper board have been punched in small type the capitals H A I. The letter A was punched upside down. § On the front flyleaf in pencil the Dutch Jewish name: V. Goldsmid, probably 20th century) (Collation: A-2D8; A-X8, (leaves X6, X7 & X8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120234 Euro 280,00
EPICTETUS, THEOPHRASTUS. EPIKTÊTOU EGCHEIRIDION. THEOPHRASTOU ÊTHIKOI CHARAKTÊRES. Epicteti Enchiridion. Theophrasti Characteres ethici. Edidit C. Aldrich, A.M. Aedis Christi Alumn. Oxford (Oxonii), E Theatro Sheldoniano, 1707. 4to. 2 parts in 1: (XVI),72; 46 p., 2 engraved plates. Calf 20 cm (Ref: Ad Epictetum: Hoffmann 2,15; Schweiger 1,106; Oldfather 117; Dibdin 1,516; Ebert 6774; Ad Theophrastum: not in Hoffmann, nor in Schweiger) (Details: Early 19th century binding. Back with 5 raised bands. Gilt shield in second compartment. Boards blind stamped. Engraved printer's mark on the title. Engraved fullpage portrait of a writing Epictetus, his crutch at hand; and at the beginning of the second part an engraved portrait of Theophrastus) (Condition: Both joints are cracking. Corners bumped. Bookplate on the front pastedown. Endpapers browning) (Note: Nobody seems to know who Charles Aldrich, the editor of this edition, is. On the title it is said that he is an alumnus of Christ Church, and the dedicatio is to his uncle Patrue Reverende Henry Aldrich, deacon of Christ Church. The dedicatio is signed by Carolus Aldrich (Charles Aldrich) nepos tuus. Now, in A directory of the parochial libraries of the Church of England and the Church of Wales by N.R. Ker & M. Perkins, London 2004, p. 235, we find s.v. Henley-On-Thames, that a Charles Aldrich left his books to Henley-on-Thames. 'Charles Aldrich (1681-1737), rector of Henley 1709-1737, in his will of 1736 left 'all my study books to the rectory of Henley, being desirous to lay the foundation of a parochial library, begging my successor, or the parish, to provide a room for them, if God should not spare my life to do it'. In 1710 Aldrich had become Librarian at Christ Church, Oxford, where his uncle Henry Aldrich (1647-1710) was Dean, an appointment made to facilitate the carrying out of his wish that his library duplicates should be given to his nephew. The term 'duplicate' was loosely interpreted, and many early books and inscribed presentation copies came into Charles Aldrich's library which should not have left Christ Church'. This solves also a problem mentioned in Oldfather 117 (W.A. Oldfather, 'Contributions toward a bibliography of Epictetus', Urbana, 1927). Oldfather says that Charles Aldrich is regarded as the editor of the editions of 1680 and 1702, the latter being a reimpression of that of 1680. Aldrich however cannot be the editor since he was not even born in 1680. In his note to Oldfather 114, the Oxford edition of 1680, Oldfather explains that he has this knowledge from Fabricius, who ascribes this 1680 edition to Aldrich in his Bibliotheca Graeca, 3rd edition, Hamburg 1796, p. 80. The real editor of the 1680 edition might be the classical scholar, Dean of Christ Church, bishop of Oxford, Architypographus of the University Press, John Fell (1625-1686), because Aldrich tells the reader on page (VII) in his Ad Lectorem that he minime deflexisse from illa Felli editione of 1680. This could mean from the University Press, led by John Fell since 1672. More probable is that Fell himself brought out the Epictetus of 1680. John Fell had a high reputation as a Grecian and a philologist. He published editions of Cyprian, Aratus, Theocritus, Athenagoras and other classical authors. (N. Barker, The Oxford University Press and the Spread of Learning, Oxf., 1978, p. 14-26; see also the 11th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, s.v. John Fell) The Greek text, of Epictetus and Theophrastus, is followed by a Latin translation, and by text critical and explanatory notes. (Provenance: Bookplate: Uit de Bibliotheek van de Doopsgezinde Gemeente bij het Lam en den Toren te Amsterdam. The 400 years old anabaptist (doopsgezind) community still exists. Its members attend church in Amsterdam at the Singelkerk in the center of the city. The anabaptist were persecuted and suppressed during the 16th and 17th century, and were later tolerated by the Calvinist and the local gouvernment. In the past there were in Amsterdam ten anabaptist communities, which went to church for example Bij de Zon, Bij het Lam or Bij de Toren. Bij het Lam was built next to a brewery called Het Lam at the Singel. In 1801 the communities were united in the Verenigde Doopgezinde Gemeente Amsterdam. The library of the Amsterdam Anabaptists was founded in 1680 by reverend Johannes Reyersen, when he donated his books to the anabaptist kweekschool, a teacher training college. This library and school were located in the church In de Toren till 1810, and then were relocated in a house next to the church Bij het Lam. In 1969 this library merged into the University Library of the University of Amsterdam. Leftovers and doubles were later sold in parts) (Collation: a - b4, A - F4 (minus F4); 2F4 3F4 4F4 5F2 (minus 5F2) G - M4 (M4 blank) ) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120468 Euro 250,00
EPICTETUS. Simplicii commentarius in Enchiridion Epicteti, ex libris veteribus emendatus. Cum versione Hieronymi Wolfii, et Cl. Salmasii animadversionibus, et notis quibus Philosophia Stoica passim explicatur & illustratur. (Praefatio Danielis Heinsii (...); Cebetis Tabula, Graece, Latine, Arabice: eiusdemque delineatio aeri incisa; Aurea Carmina Pythagorae cum paraphrasi Arabica quam recensuit & in latinum convertit Iohannes Elichmannus, M.D.; Praefatio Cl. Salmasii in Cebetis Tabulam Arabicam & Pythagorae Carmina Aurea Arabice versa; Accessit Index in Simplicium copiosissimus) Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Typis Iohannis Maire, 1640. 4to. 3 volumes in 1: (XX),332,(12 index); (II),329,(23 index); (XL),88;15,(1 blank) p., folding plate. Calf 20.5 cm (Ref: Breugelmans, Fac et Spera, no. 1640-17; Oldfather no. 812; Hoffmann 2,13; Dibdin 2,513/14; Ebert 6768; Brunet 2,1012) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands; compartments ruled gilt with double fillets and a star in the centre of the compartments; gilt short title in the second compartment; gilt double fillet border on both covers; the first title in red and black; woodcut printer's mark on the titles, depicting a toiling farmer, busy turning soil with his spade, the motto is 'Fac et Spera'. Greek text and Latin translation in 2 columns; the folding plate, 40x50 cm, is an artist's impression of the 'Tabula Cebetis'. It is the work of N.I. Visscher, and shows the many ways leading to vice, and the only straight and narrow path to virtue: we see a garden with 2 concentric walls filled with a host of allegorical figures. At the Entrance (to life) sits Seductio (Temptation), offering a youth a drink from a goblet. In the foreground also the philosopher Cebes explaining to a bunch of young children the dangers and temptations which lie ahead. Most people within the first wall, among who kings and bishops, are busy gambling, fighting, drinking. Within the second wall we see philosophers and scholars. In the background is a high hill with a temple on top, a destination which is reached by only a few. This engraving is a minimized version of Goltzius' engraving of the 'Tabula' of Cebes of 1592. In the lower margin of the plate is a frieze of 7 cm in which we find ample explanation of 22 allegorical figures on this engraving in Latin and in Dutch) (Condition: Binding somewhat scuffed; covers scratched; head & tail of spine chafed rubbed; corners bumped; a few gatherings at the end are loosening; the folding plate is loose, and worn; some tears and the wear of the folds have been repaired with acidfree paper tape) (Note: The Greek Neplatonic philosopher and commentaror Simplicius, ca. 490-560 A.D., was one of the last great philosophers of pagan antiquity. He is best known for his useful commentaries on the Enchiridium of Epictetus and on Aristotle's Categoriae, Physica, De Caelo and De Anima. He had to flee Athens, to escape anti-pagan measures taken by the Roman emperor Justinian I, who closed the Platonist school, to the court of the Persian king Chosroes. His commentary on the Enchiridium is propaedeutic. The Enchiridium, in English Manual or Handbook, of the Greek Stoic philosopher Epictetus, ca. 50-130 A.D., is in fact a later summary, or epitome, of his collected lectures, also called diatribes, which had been published by his pupil Arrianus. Like the Stoics Epictetus wanted to make man free and independent of the vicissitudes of fortune. 'We must not, he said, let our happiness depend on things which are not in our power. The only thing which is always in one's power is one's own self and one's will. This we must keep unblemished. We must be indifferent to death, pain and illness, and even the loss of our dearest relatives must not touch us. For all this not only belongs to the external world, but also happens through Divine Providence, which is always good' (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 390) The practical exercises for a moral life of the pagan Epictetus found many Christian admirers, and he continued to be read in Byzantine times. The Renaissance brought Epictetus new readers. In 1479 a Latin translation by Polizziano of the Manual was published. The Manual was even adapted by a 16th century Jesuit, Matteo Ricci, for a Chinese public, for, he argued, Stoicism was close in spirit to Confucianism. The classical scholar and neostoic Justus Lipsius, 1547-1606, thought that the Stoicism of Epictetus could profitably be combined with Christianity. A host of editions and translations was published before the 19th century. After that interest in Epictetus declined, 'although Nietzsche acknowledged him as one of the great moralists of antiquity, whose quiet slave nobility compared favorably with Christian slave morality. More recently Epictetus has benefited from a renewed scholarly interest in Hellenistic philosophy'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 319/20) Although he is not mentioned on the title, it is clear from the short introduction, written by the Dutch classicist Daniel Heinsius, 1580-1655, that he edited the Greek text of Simplicius. He tells us that he used for this new edition the text which was published in Venice in 1528. He collated it with the help of another manuscript, according to the 'Typographus amico lectori' a codex called Nansianus. Oldfather ascribes this title simply to Daniel Heinsius and not to Salmasius. Heinsius 'began the work, collated new Manuscripts and carried it far towards completion'. (Oldfather 812) Schweighaeuser states simply, 'At in ipso libro (edition of Simplicius) curando nullae prorsus fuerant Salmasii partes'. (Schweighaeuser, Epicteti Manuale, Lpz., 1798, p. XLVI) The Greek text is accompanied by the Latin translation of the German Hieronymus Wolf, 1516-1580, which was first published in Basel in 1560/63. The second volume contains the notes on Simplicius edited by the French scholar Claude de Saumaise, or Claudius Salmasius, 1588-1653. He was in Leyden the successor of Scaliger, and was a prolific author and textual critic. Oldfather tells that Salmasius only completed the work began by Heinsius, and that he 'added numerous, but not very valuable notes'. Schweighaeuser adds that Salmasius did not finish his notes (numquam absolutum) (Schweighaeuser, p. XLVI) The third (small) part contains an Arabic version of the 'Tabula Cebetis', and the 'Aurea Carmina' of Pythagoras, accompanied by a Greek and Latin translation, produced in his sparetime by the German Dr. Med. Johannes Elichmann, 1600-1639. He was a physician who learned himself Arabic. In 1636 he wrote an article, in which he underlined the use of Arabic for the study of Medicin. He was a successfull physician in the city of Leiden, where he had both Daniel Heinsius and Claude de Saumaise among his patients. He was one of the first to declare that Persian and German had the same roots. He died young, and could not accomplish his goal, to produce Arabic translations of Greek texts which were lost, or had been published incompletely. 'Vor allem aber wollte er arabische Übersetzungen von solchen griechischen Werken in Text und Übersetzung herausgeben, deren Urtext entweder verloren war oder nur in fehlerhaften Ausgaben vorlag. Als ersten wählte er die arabischen Paraphrasen der (damals als Schullektüre beliebten) Tabula Cebetis, sowie der pythagoräischen Goldenen Verse aus, um seine These zu beweisen, dass der arabische Text zur Emendation und Ergänzung des griechischen Originals wesentliche Hilfe biete.' Salmasius took good care of the abandoned manuscripts of Elichmann and published them in this edition of 1640. (NDB 4,440) In the course of his studies Elichmann stumbled upon an Arabic manuscript containing the paraphrase of the Enchiridium and the Golden Verses, the work of a learned scholar Ahmud ibn Muhammad ibn Miskawayh (d. 1030). 'From this Arabic manuscript Dr. Elichmann prepared an edition of the Tabula of Cebes with his own Latin translation which he intended to have printed along with the Greek text. (...) Salmasius was the ideal person to prepare Elichmann's edition for publication. Since he himself was an experienced Arabic scholar, he went over the text very carefully, comparing it with the Greek. He found, as Elichmann had said, that the Arabic text represented a paraphrase of a Greek manuscript considerably older that those in existence in his time. (...) Apparently the notes and commentary which Elichmann had expected to publish with the triple texts were not available, so Salmasius himself examined the text in detail and furnished notes on the textual problems he encountered'. (C.E. Lutz, 'The Salmasius-Elichmann edition of the Tabula of Cebes', Harvard Library Bulletin, vol. 27/2 (april 1979), Cambr. Mass., 1979 , p. 166/71) The 3 texts are printed in parallel columns, the Arabic, the Latin translation of Elichmann. The 3rd columns offers the Greek text apparently from one of the Greek manuscripts available to Elichmann. 'There are 2 features of the Arabic paraphrase and the Latin translation which deserve special attention. In the first place, ibn Miskawayh must have had a Greek manuscript (of the Tabula Cebetis) that preserved a good textual tradition, for in a number of places it has been found useful in restoring some omission or correcting a faulty reading found in all of the extant (later) Greek manuscripts. More striking, however, is the inclusion of a considerable amount of additional material at the end of the dialogue in the Arabic and Latin versions. Nothing comparable has been found in any of the extant Greek manuscripts, for there the text breaks off abruptly in chapter 41. The paraphrase provides over a manuscript page of material, forming chapters 42 and 43. In these last chapters the allegory is satisfactorily rounded out with an appropriate ending. (...) This would seem to have constituted the substance of the conclusion of the original dialogue'. (C.E. Lutz, p. 169) The Cebetis Tabula is a dialogue which dates from the first century A.D. It was attributed to the philosopher Cebes, a student of the Athenian Socrates. In it an ancient temple painting (tabula), which caught the attention of 2 visitors, is explained by an old man. It is an allegorical picture on which the dangers and temptations of human life are symbolically represented. It shows that happiness can only be reached by proper education and a virtuous life. This once popular ethical work is now almost forgotten. But in the 16th, 17th and 18th century it was widely read, e.g. by clergymen and preachers. The Golden Verses (Carmina aurea) are commonly attributed to the Greek philosopher and mathematician Pythagoras, born ca. 570 B.C. on the island of Samos, His life is enshrouded in legend. 'He wrote probably nothing (though works were later fathered on him) and already in Aristotle's day his life was obsured by legend'. (OCD 2nd ed. 903) He is the founder of a sect, the followers of which obeyed to strict ascetic rules, e.g. not eating flesh of killed animals. Pythagoras' speculations concerning the philosophy of nature were important for the development of mathematics and music theory. His moral teachings were probably tranfered in the archaic form of (often aenigmatic) sayings, his 'carmina aurea'. The study of the life and work of Pythagoras is obscured by the fact that already the oldest Pythagoreans ascribed their own utterances to the Master of the sect. The proverbial 'autos epha', Pythagoras himself said so, was considered as an ultimate proof of validity. His Golden Verses were well known among educated readers in antiquity, though the testimonia indicate that the authorship of the Golden Verses poem was already problematical for the ancients. The 'carmina aurea' consist of 71 didactic hexameters. Every scholar who ever looked at these verses seems to have his own opinion about its author, origin and date. (Quot homines, tot sententiae) It is however clear 'from the testimonia that the Golden Verses was highly regarded in late antiquity as a concise formulation of principles of the philosophical life. The Neoplatonists, starting with Iamblichus, probably all used the poem as a propaedeutic moral instruction, preparing the way for philosophy proper'. ('The Pythagorean Golden Verses'. With introduction and commentary by J.C. Thom, Leiden, 1995, p. 13) Pythagoras' body of thought was incorporated in Platonism, and found followers well into late antiquity. In modern times Pythagoras played an important role in the devolopment of the study of natural sciences. Gallilei, Copernicus and Kepler appealed to him) (Provenance: On the title the manuscript ownership entry: 'Bernardi de Vauquelin, dni de Méheudin, 1665'. (dni = domini, in French 'sieur') The family Vauquelin belongs to old Normandian gentry, some of its members added to their name 'sieur de Méheudin'. Méheudin is a village in the Department of Orne, On line we found in 'Inventaire sommaire des archives départementales antérieures a 1790, Archives Ecclésiastiques' (Paris, 1874), in the year 1671, one 'Bernard de Vauquelin, du diocèse de Séez'. (Séez is nowadays Sées) This diocese Séez (Sées) embraced the Department of Orne, (near the Calvados in Normandy) and fell under the Archdioces of Rouen. 'La Curé de Méheudin' was since 1143 a fief, and came later in the possession of the Vauquelin family. (Dictionnaire de la Noblesse, Tome X, Paris 1775, p. 13) In august 2013 a French antiquarian bookseller, a colleague of ours at Rouen, 'Librairie Bertran', offered on his website a book with the name of 'Bernard de Vauquelin' on its title. The remarkable thing is that it concerns a book of the same Salmasius, his 'Dissertatio de foenere trapezitico' published by the same Maire, and in the same year 1640. The photograph even reveals that the binding looks more or less similar to the binding of our copy. Another French colleague, the Parisian 'Librairie les Dioscures', had also a copy with Vauquelin's provenance on offer, Lucan's 'De Bello civili (...) Accurante C. Schrevelio', Amsterdam, Elzevier, 1658. The description of the binding does suggest that the binding of this book is similar too. De Vauquelin was obviously interested in (Roman) classical antiquity. The 2 books we've traced and our copy are scholarly works. The three books, with ownership entries dated 1664 and 1665, have probably been bound by a local binder) (Collation: Vol. 1: *-2*, (?)2; A-X4, Aa-Vv4. Vol. 2: pi1, A-Z4, Aa-Xx4. Vol. 3: *-4*4, 5*1, A-L4; A-B4 (leaf B4 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130462 Euro 1250,00
EPICTETUS. Handt-Boecxken van Epictetus. Cebes Tarereel, Isocratis Vermaninge aen Demonicum, en Plutarchus Van de Op-voedinghe der Kinderen. Als oock mede 't Mergh van de Nederlandtsche Spreeckwoorden, waer in H.L. Spiegels By-spraecks Almanack. Noyt aldus volkomen gedruckt. Amsterdam, By Jacobus van den Bergh, 1660. 12mo. 3 parts in 1: (2),218;124 p. Vellum 14 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 18,2,b; Geerebaert 69,7; Oldfather 338) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. All three parts have their own title. Printed in black letter (Gothic script)) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled and spotted. Front flyleaf removed. Bookplate tipped in on front the pastedown) (Note: According to Geerebaert the translator of the Enchiridium and the other works included in this volume is Dirk Pietersz Pers; according to Oldfather the translator was Marcus Antonius Gillis; Oldfather must be wrong, because this translation is certainly different from the translation of Gillis. (We compared the translation of 1615 (Geerebaert 18,1) and this one of 1660) Furthermore we are told by an anonymous on p. 107 that this is a new and more comprehensible translation than that of Gillis. We could not find why Geerebaert attributes the translation of 1660 to the author/publisher Pers. One thing is sure, this book is completely based on the edition of 1644 produced by the Amsterdam-publisher Hartgers. There are only minor differences in orthography. In this 1644-edition also no translator is mentioned. Because the translations of 1644 and 1660 are combined with two collections of Dutch moralistic proverbs collected by H.L. Spiegel, 1549-1612, some bibliographers thought that this translation (and that of 1644), was made by Spiegel. We know that Spiegel was busy learning Greek in 1585 or 1586 (Coornhert Zedenkunst, ed. B. Bekker, Leiden, 1942, p. XIV). According to Buisman however his knowledge of Greek was not sufficient enough to understand the original Greek text. (J.F. Buisman, De ethische denkbeelden van Hendrik Laurensz. Spiegel, Wageningen, 1935, p. 106) Spiegel was one of the prominent authors and thinkers in the Dutch republic of the second half of the 16th century. He is considered to be a precursor of Hooft, Huygens and Vondel, and by some even of Spinoza) (Provenance: Small bookplate of one 'U.P.', within grey borders and above an opened book. It was designed by 'J.N'. This is the Dutch graphic designer Jacob Nuiver, 1892-1953, who worked for Philips, Eindhoven, and for Proost & Zoon, a wholesale company of paper. The book was once the property of the bibliophile Ulco Proost, 1885-1966, one of the owners of this centuries old firm. His huge and prestigeous library was auctioned in 1967 by Beijers, Utrecht) (Collation: A-O12, P4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120499 Euro 290,00
EPICTETUS. EPIKTÊTOY Egcheiridion, KEBÊTOS thêbaiou Pinaks; kai THEOPHRASTOY Êthikoi Charaktêres. Epicteti Enchiridion, Cebetis Thebani Tabula; et Theophrasti Characteres Ethici. Cum versione latina. Denuo recognita & notis illustrata. Oxford (Oxonii), E Theatro Sheldoniano, 1670. 8vo. (XV)(1),143(1);95(1),8 p. Calf 15.5 cm (Ref: Oldfather 175, see also 114; Ebert 6771; not in Hoffmann; only 2 copies in the British Libraries; cf. Brunet 2,1012, who mentions an edition of 1707) (Details: Back ruled gilt, and with 4 raised bands. Black morocco shield in second compartment. Boards ruled with double fillet borders. Greek text with facing Latin translation) (Condition: Cover scuffed and worn at the extremes. Head of the spine gone for 1 cm. Front joint beginning to split. Corners bumped) (Note: This book is the first publication for the market, i.e. 'real book', printed in the famous Sheldonian Theatre, which was named after the Chancellor of the University, and archbishop of Canterbury, Gilbert Sheldon. The building, a work of Christopher Wren, was completed in 1668. The Vice-Chancellor of the University John Fell 'the most powerful man on the University' in those days 'persuaded Sheldon that, when not in use, the building might be used for printing. Composing frames and presses, (no less than five, a large number then) all built locally, were moved in before the builders were out, late in 1668 or early 1669'. (N. Barker, 'The Oxford University Press and the spread of Learning, 1478-1978, Oxf., 1978, p. 15) In F. Madan's 'Oxford books, a bibliography of printed works relating to the University and City of Oxford, or printed or published there' (Oxford, 1895-1931) we found for 1670 only a few small occasional publications, e.g. some epicedia (funeral songs), or more or less internal University documents, such as the 'Parecbolae sive excerpta e corpore statutorum Universitatis Oxon. in usum juventutis academicae'. The only real book 'e Theatro Sheldoniano' in 1670 is this Epictetus/Cebes/Theophrastus edition. (Madan, vol. 3 (1931), no. 2853) For the previous year of 1669 Madan mentions only the imprint 'e theatro Sheldoniano' for the occasional poem of Corbet Owen, 'Carmen Pindaricum', a bad poem by the way, which was recited at the opening of the Theatre on the 9th of July 1669. In order to understand the following search for the identity of the editor of this anonymous 1670 edition, one should know that an expanded edition 'e Theatro Sheldoniano' was printed in 1680 (also anonymously), and another one in 1707. The 1707 edition mentions on its title an editor, 'C. Aldrich' (Carolus, Charles Aldrich), student of 'Christ Church'. Later bibliographers assumed that this same Aldrich must also have been responsible for the anonymous 1670 & 1680 editions. Now Aldrich's dates are 1681-1737. (See for Charles Aldrich 'A directory of the parochial libraries of the Church of England and the Church of Wales' by N.R. Ker & M. Perkins, London 2004, p. 235, s.v. Henley-On-Thames, where the story of his library is told) So, Charles Aldrich cannot have produced the edition of 1670, nor that one of 1680. He however gives us a clue to the identity of the editor of the 1680 edition. The real editor of the 1680 edition, we must conclude, is most probably the classical scholar, Dean of Christ Church, bishop of Oxford, John Fell, because Aldrich tells us on page a4-recto of his 'Ad Lectorem' that he 'minime deflexisse' from 'illa Felli editione' of 1680. This could mean of course 'from the edition of the University Press, led by John Fell', but this seems far fetched. More probable is that Aldrich refers to an Epictetus edition of 1680, which was produced by Fell himself. The name on the title of the 1707 edition caused later bibliographers (Fabricius/Harles, Bibliotheca Graeca, Hamburg, 1796, volume V, p. 80, but also Oldfather in his 'Bibliography of Epictetus', no's 114 and 117) to ascribe the 1670 and 1680 edition erroneously to Aldrich. As shown above, the almost certain editor of the 1680 edition is John Fell. On the title of the 1680 edition even the phrase on the title of 1670 'denuo recognita & notis illustrata' was copied. That it is a reprint (with the addition of passages from Prodicus and Cicero, not yet found in the first edition) of 1670 is proved by the reproduction in 1680 of the 1670 misprint of 'viderà' for 'videre' on page A4-verso of the preface. In the preface of 1670 it is admitted that the edition is based on earlier ones, especially those of Meric Casaubon and Salmasius, but the editor claims to have filled some 'lacunae' and to have corrected the Greek text and Latin translation (by Meric Casaubon, first published in 1659), not only with the help of the printed sources, but also by collating manuscripts from the Bodleian Library and the Library of the New College. (A3-verso) From the abundant notes of others he offers only an anthology (sylva), to eludicate some matters. These notes can be found at the end of the book, and they number only 8 pages. The notes are brief, for the editor says that he does not approve of voluminous books, stuffed with unnecessary knowledge. To underline his loathing he tells the reader that he left the job of compiling this 'sylva' of notes to a 'juvenis studiosus' who had plenty of time for that (cui otium magis suppetebat). (A3-verso & A4-recto) The tone of the writer of the preface is mature and very confident, he surely is a proud and advanced scholar. This leaves us in Oxford ca. 1670 with only one person, John Fell, 1625-1686, a great classical scholar, Dean of Christ Church, bishop of Oxford, and Architypographus of the University Press from 1672. He had a high reputation as a Grecian and a philologist, and published editions of Cyprian, Aratus, Theocritus, Athenagoras and other classical authors. (N. Barker, 'The Oxford University Press and the Spread of Learning', Oxf., 1978, p. 14-26; see also the 11th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, s.v. John Fell) It is more than appropriate to assume that Fell produced the first 'real' book, be it for students, for the press of his University. For the founding of the revived Press of the University of Oxford was his work alone. Epictetus and the 2 other works in this volume have been repeatedly republished by the University Press, in 1680 and 1707 (already mentioned), but also in 1702, 1715, 1723, 1739 and 1804 (Madan, no. 2853) Madan tells about the misprint 'viderà' for 'videre' in the preface that it 'is perhaps in all copies corrected by hand'. Our copy apparantly escaped the attention of the corrector, for the misprint has not been corrected. This book seems to be extremely rare. We found only 5 copies in British Libraries, one in the British Library, 2 in the Bodleian, one in Cambridge University Library, and one in Sheffield. All British university libraries hold an electronic or microfilm copy of the book. They all ascribe this edition to Aldrich, except the British Library and the Bodleian. They mention John Fell. We searched in KVK for other copies, and we found only 2 other copies, one in the University Library Gent, and one in the Royal Library of Denmark. The copy of the 'Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin' is lost owing to 'Kriegsverlust'. We found not one copy auctioned in 'Americana Exchange') (Provenance: The front pastedown has once been renewed. Through the paper is vaguely visible a big bookplate) (Collation: A-Q8, R4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120243 Euro 950,00
EPICTETUS. Epicteti Manuale et Sententiae. Quibus accedunt Tabula Cebetis, & alia affinis argumenti, in linguam Latinam conversa a Marco Meibomio. Subjiciuntur eiusdem notae, emendationes Claudii Salmasii in Epictetum, notae illorum & alius viri docti in Dissertationes Epicteti ab Arriano digestas, & varians scriptura codicum manu exaratorum, cura Hadriani Relandi. Utrecht (Trajecti Batavorum), Ex officina Gulielmi Broedelet, biliopolae, 1711. 4to. 3 parts in 1: (XX,151,(1);124; 152,(59 index),(1 blank) p. Calf 21 cm (Ref: Oldfather no. 287; Hoffmann 2,15; Didbin 2,515/6: 'The edition is a valuable and critical one'; Ebert 6775; Brunet 2,1012/13; P.A. Hansen, 'A bibliography of Danish contributions to classical scholarship from the 16th century to 1970', Copenhagen 1977, no. 363) (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands; title printed in red and black; woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting Athena and Hermes, motto: 'Suum cuique tribue'; woodcut initials; Greek text with facing Latin translation; last 152 pages are filled with the notes of Meiboom (1-32), the notes and emendations of the Enchiridium by Salmasius (33-48), notes and emendations by Meiboom and Salmasius 'in Arriani Epictetum' (49-98), variae lectiones (99-136, and an 'Accessio ad emendationes Meibomianas in Dissertationes Epicteteas Arriani' (137-152). The last 4 pages of the preliminary leaves are, owing to a binder's error, to be found in the last gathering of the book) (Condition: Cover scuffed; back rubbed; corners bumped; front joint starting to split; head & tail of the spine chafed; bookplate on front pastedown) (Note: There is something odd about this book. Half of the book is printed carefully with the use of beautiful Greek and Roman type, and is presented in a balanced layout. The woodcut initials are sharp and elegant. The other half of the book is printed on paper of somewhat lesser quality, with the use of dull and conventional Greek and Roman type. The woodcut initials are quite common and worn. This difference has its story, and reflects the life and character of its main contributor, Marcus Meibom. The 'fine' half was printed in Copenhagen, about 40 years earlier than the other half, which was printed in Utrecht in 1711. The Danish philologist Marcus Meibom, or Marcus Meibomius, was born in 1630 in Tönning in Schleswig-Holstein. He was a scholar with a bad temper and a lot of ennemies. After a turbulent life he died poor in Utrecht in 1710 or 1711. He was 'one of those colourful people who, despite numerous initiatives, was unable to ascend in the Republic of Letters. He had achieved some fame with an edition of seven classical authors on music, which he dedicated to Queen Christina of Sweden, and for which he received an invitation to her court in return. He himself had reconstructed instruments from antiquity, with which he tried to put on a concert (for the court of the Queen); unfortunately, the performance generated only hilarity and ended in turmoil. Frustrated Meiboom then attacked a friend of the Queen, which forced him to leave'. (D. van Miert, 'Humanism in an age of science: the Amsterdam Athenaeum in the Golden Age, 1632-1704', Leiden 2009, p. 88) Meibom treated everyone crudely and could never restrain his arrogance. The Dutch gentleman/scholar Nicolaas Heinsius called him a 'hungry rogue' and an 'ungrateful person'. (D. van Miert p. 89) In 1653 Meibom left Sweden, and entered into the service of king Frederic III of Denmark. He was made royal librarian and professor at Uppsala the next year. (Michaud, 'Biographie Universelle', Vol. 28, Lpz., 1843, p. 520/1) In 1668 he accepted a position at the Athenaeum Illustre at Amsterdam, to give public lectures and private tuition, with a salary of 1200 guilders a year. One year later, in 1670, he was fired. The reason was that, as Burmannus reports in a letter, 'Meiboom had turned up his nose at the obligation to give private tuition to the sons of the bourgomasters'. (D. van Miert, p. 90) 'Meiboom next dedicated himself to the military shipping trade. He reviewed a book on this subject by Johan Scheffer, and wrote a book himself on antique triremes, with which he left for England to convince Charles II that these antique vessels would give him supremacy at sea'. (D. van Miert, p. 91) Of course this untertaking was not successful. He also tried to sell his project to the French, but found no one interested. His next great project in England in 1674 was the publishing of the Old Testament with his remarks on the Hebrew text, of which he wanted to correct numerous passages. He shocked the English and had to return to Holland poorer than ever. Nevertheless he possessed some very valubable ancient manuscripts, which he did not want to sell. He died in Utrecht, where his heirs found the unfinished edition of Epictetus, printed ca. 40 years before, which they sold to the publisher Broedelet. He asked Hadrianus Relandus to finish it. The part of Meibom opens with the Greek text with facing Latin translation of the Enchiridion, then follow the 'Epicteti Sententiae ex Joanne Stobaeo, Graece & Latine', the 'Cebetis Thebani Tabula, Graece & Latine', and 'Prodicus de Hercule, ex Xenophontis Memorabilium libro IIdo Joa. Leunclavio interprete', a allogoric story about Hercules on the crossroads, where he has to choose between Virtue and Vice. Meibom finished with 'Hippocratis Epistola' to Damagetus, a long letter concerning the madness of the 'laughing philosopher' Democritus. This letter is a founding text in the history of melancholy. Relandus tells the reader in the preface that while he was working on this edition he stumbled upon a traesure (thesaurum), an Epictetus edition dated 1595 (Oldfather 15) from the library of Meibom, in the margins of which the French scholar Claude de Saumaise, or Claudius Salmasius, 1588-1653, had jotted down corrections and emendations to the Enchiridion. (General preface leaf *2, and preface to the notes of Salmasius, p. 37/38) Salmasius was in Leyden the successor of Scaliger, and a prolific author and textual critic. He had produced once an Enchiridium edition himself. (Amsterdam, 1640) Michaud tells about Meibom's part of this Enchiridion edition that the 'roi de Danemarck fit imprimer cet ouvrage à ses frais, et fit présent de la totalité de l'édition à Meibom, qui la garda plus de quarante ans dans son cabinet'. (Michaud, vol. 28 p. 521) The quality of the printing of Meibom's part of the book seems to affirm the story of Michaud, still the question remains why Meibom had transported heavy barrels full of quality printing to Amsterdam in 1668/69, and forgot about it for the next 40 years? Boter follows the suggestion of Schweighaeuser in his edition of 1798, (Schweighaeuser, Lpz. 1798, p. LIXV) and argues that Meibom did not think his own work worthy of publication. (G. Boter, 'The Encheiridion of Epictetus and its three christian adaptations', Leiden 1999, p. 78) This seems hard to believe with regard to such an arrogant and headstrong character. He was very much convinced of his own genius. Graevius wrote in a letter to N. Heinsius that Meibom considered himself a better philologist than Isaac Casaubon, Carlo Sigonio, Gronovius and Salmasius. (D. van Miert, p. 91) Modesty and humility were not his strongest points. The flaws in the character of this (manic?) man, who led a tumultuous life, might be the cause of the abandonment of the project. Moreover, when Meibon arrived in Amsterdam, and would have asked around in 1669 if someone was interested in publishing his Epictetus' Enchiridium, he would have heard that in Amsterdam the publishers Boom and Ravestein were already busy producing an edition for 1670, as did the Van Gaasbeek brothers. Anyway, Meibom's heirs sold part of his possessions, including the barrels filled with plano sheats of a book which had never been published. The first page of the collection simply said 'Epicteti Manuale, Graece & Latine'. The load of paper was bought by the publisher Broedelet, who asked the Dutch scholar Hadrianus Relandus, for whom he had published several titles, to write an introduction and to produce some commentary, and an index. 'Relandus did his best, he wrote introductions to the different parts, added the notes of Meibom and Salmasius, which he had found among Meibom's papers and in the margins of some of his books. He added also collations of two manuscripts, the 'codex Hafniensis' (p. 101-119 of the second part), and the 'codex Gerdesianus' (p. 120-136 of the second part). That Meibom did a good job was already noted in 1711 in the periodical 'Acta Eruditorum. 'Haec editio est accurata, & a mendis typographicis pura, literis elegantibus & majoribus impressa'. (Acta Eruditorum, 1711, p. 374) Furthermore, Schweighaeuser dedicates almost seven of his preliminary pages of his famous 1798 edition of the Enchiridium to this work of Meibomius/Relandus. And G. Boter deems Meibomius/Relandus worthy of incorporating them in the short list of 'Studiosi in apparatu critico laudati' of his edition of the Enchiridium, published in the normative 'Bibliotheca Teubneriana' series, Berlin 2007. Adrianus Reland, or Hadrianus Relandus, 1676-1718, was a child prodigy. At 13 he enrolled as a student at the University of Utrecht, where he studied philosophy, classics and oriental languages. In 1700 he was appointed professor of Oriental languages and Holy Antiquities. This 'jewel' of the university remained in Utrecht till his untimely death at the age of 41. He didnot publish much on Oriental languages, but wrote some influential works on Hebrew antiquities, the 'Antiquitates sacrae veterum Hebraeorum' (1708 & 1712, publisher Broedelet), and 'Palestina ex monumentis veteribus illustrata', (1714, publisher Broedelet). His best known work seems to be 'De religione mohammedica' (1705, publisher Broedelet), which was reissued several times, and was translated into several languages. In this work he broke new ground with an honest and correct approach of this religion. As a consequence the Vatican placed it on the Index of forbidden books) (Provenance: On the front pastedown the remains of a woodcut bookplate. The lower part with the name of the owner has been removed. It shows the Royal arms of the United Kingdom, as used by the Hanover dynasty between 1714 and 1800, during the reign of King George I, II & III. (See Wikipedia, s.v. 'Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom') The shield is oval, and rests on a pedestal. Around the oval a belt with the motto of the Order of the Garter 'Honi soit qui mal y pense'. The oval is surmounted with a royal crown. Before the pedestal a banner with the motto of the English monarchs 'Dieu et mon droit'. Right of the shield the Unicorn, and left a crowned lion. (There is no royal helm beneath the crown) The bookplate is probably of a royal or of a library of a public institution, and dates from before 1800) (Collation: *-2*4, A-T4, 2A-2P4, 2Q2; A-R4, *R4-*S4, S-2B4 (leaf 2B4 verso blank; the second and third leaf of the last gathering 2B are signed 3*1 and 3*2; these 2 leaves ought to have been cut out and bound after 2*4; we once sold another copy of this book, and it showed the same binder's error) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130463 Euro 390,00
EPICTETUS. Epicteti Enchiridium una cum Cebetis Thebani tabula, Graec. & Lat. Cum notis Wolfii, Casauboni, Caselii & aliorum; quibus accedit Graeca Enchiridii paraphrasis, lacunis omnibus, codicis Medicei ope a Jacobo Gronovio repletis. Recensuit & a plurimis mendis, quae in priores editiones irrepserant, repurgavit, ac notis quibusdam & animadversionibus illustravit Joannes Casparus Schröderus. Delft (Delphis), Apud Adrianum Beman, 1723. 8vo. (LXIV),288 p., frontispiece, folding plate. Vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: Oldfather no. 232, but see also Oldfather Supplement no. 233; Hoffmann 2,15; Dibdin 1,515: on the 2nd edition of 1683: 'is reputed the best of the octavo Variorums'; Ebert 6777; Brunet 2,1013) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints; engraved frontispiece depicting the philosopher Epictetus, behind him a host of (allegoric) female followers. One holds a lamp, another a pair of scales. In his left hand Epictetus holds a scroll with one of his motto's: 'ANECHOU KAI APECHOU', 'bear (with patience) and abstain', his recipe for a 'vita tranquilissima' (Gellius book 17, caput 19); he is greeted by a woman (Ethica) who leads a reined lion that has a bridle in its mouth, thus signifying reason's command over man's passions. At Epictetus' feet 5 pityful victims of their passions, among who a drunk. This frontispiece was designed and etched by the Dutch artist Romeyn de Hooghe. The copper plate of the frontispiece is here used for the second time. It was first used for the first edition of this book which was published in 1670 by Van Gaasbeek at Leiden & Amsterdam. (Romeyn de Hooghe, De verbeelding van de late Gouden Eeuw, no. 1670.03 and 1723.01). The title is printed in red and black. The text is printed in 2 columns, with juxtaposed Latin translation to the Greek text. The commentary is on the lower half of the page. The folding plate is also the work of Romeyn de Hooghe, and is an artistic illustration of the 'Tabula Cebetis'. It shows the many ways leading to vice, and the only straight and narrow path to virtue: we see a garden with 2 concentric walls filled with a host of allegorical figures. At the Entrance (to life) sits Seductio (Temptation), offering a youth a drink from a goblet. In the foreground also the philosopher Cebes explaining to a bunch of young children the dangers and temptations which lie ahead. Most people within the first wall, among who kings and bishops, are busy gambling, fighting, drinking. Within the second wall we see philosophers and scholars. In the background is a high hill with a temple on top, a destination which is reached by only a few. Romeyn de Hooghe's engraving is a mirrorwise, minimized and free baroque version of Goltzius' more solemn engraving of the Tabula of Cebes of 1592. De Hooghe's details are more explicit, narrative and passionate. Life is a sordid fight, one drinks and pukes with gusto, and we even see a shadowy naked couple making love) (Condition: Vellum slightly scratched and spotted; both pastedowns are loose) (Note: The Enchiridium, in English Manual or Handbook, of the Greek Stoic philosopher Epictetus, ca. 50-130 A.D., is in fact a later summary, or epitome, of his collected lectures, also called diatribes, which had been published by his pupil Arrianus. Like the Stoics Epictetus wanted to make man free and independent of the vicissitudes of fortune. 'We must not, he said, let our happiness depend on things which are not in our power. The only thing which is always in one's power is one's own self and one's will. This we must keep unblemished. We must be indifferent to death, pain and illness, and even the loss of our dearest relatives must not touch us. For all this not only belongs to the external world, but also happens through Divine Providence, which is always good' (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 390) The practical exercises for a moral life of the pagan Epictetus found many Christian admirers, and he continued to be read in Byzantine times. The Renaissance brought Epictetus new readers. In 1479 a Latin translation by Polizziano of the Manual was published. The Manual was even adapted by a 16th century Jesuit, Matteo Ricci, for a Chinese public, for, he argued, Stoicism was close in spirit to Confucianism. The classical scholar and neostoic Justus Lipsius, 1547-1606, thought that the Stoicism of Epictetus could profitably be combined with Christianity. A host of editions and translations was published before the 19th century. After that interest in Epictetus declined, 'although Nietzsche acknowledged him as one of the great moralists of antiquity, whose quiet slave nobility compared favorably with Christian slave morality. More recently Epictetus has benefited from a renewed scholarly interest in Hellenistic philosophy'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 319/20) Indeed, the Stoic teachings of Epictetus still have their impact. In Wikipedia we found s.v. Epictetus (English) the story of the American fighter pilot James Stockdale, 'who was shot down over North Vietnam, became a prisoner of war (...) and later a vice presidential candidate. In 'Courage under Fire: testing Epictetus's doctrines in a laboratory of human behaviour' (1993), Stockdale credits Epictetus with helping him endure seven and a half years in a North Vietnamese military prison, including torture, and four years in solitary confinement'. This Enchiridium edition of 1723, called on the frontispiece 'editio tertia', is a reissue of the second edition of the Manuel and the 'Tabula Cebetis' of 1683, Delft. It was first published in 1670 by Van Gaasbeek in Amsterdam, and was produced by the Dutch scholar Abraham van Berkel, or Abrahamus Berkelius, 1639/40 - 1686. Though trained as a physician he renounced medicin, and began to study classics under Jacobus Gronovius when he was 30 years old. He soon was appointed Rector of the Schola Latina at Delft, where he produced several competent editions, besides his Epictetus of 1670, the fragments of Stephanus Byzantinus 'De Urbibus' (Leiden 1674, and anew with commentary posthumely in 1688, his opus magnum), and an edition of Antoninus Liberalis (also Leiden 1674). (NNBW 1,309/10) The third edition on 1728 was produced by one Johannes Caspar Schröder, whom the NNBW does not know. At the end of the preface, dated 1722, Schröder calls himself an 'addictus cliens' of the Mayor of Delft, Theodorus Vallensis. From p. 5*8, the last leaf of the preliminary pages, we learn that Schröder was like Berkelius Rector of the 'Schola Latina' at Delft. Schweighaeuser reveals that Schröder was an imposter. He simply reissued the second edition of Berkelius, 'ejecto Berkelii nomine, suum praeponere nomen non erubuerit'. (J. Schweighaeuser, 'Epicteti Maunale etc.', Leipzig 1798, p. LXI) After the preface follow a short biography of Epictetus and a number of ancient testimonia, and the opinions on Epictetus of Lipsius, Henri Estienne, Meric Casaubon and Politianus. After the Enchiridium, accompanied by the notes of Wolf, Casaubon and Caselius, comes the text and Latin translation of a Byzantine 'paraphrasis' of the Enchiridium, first published by Meric Casaubon in London, 1659. The second half of the book contains the 'Tabula Cebetis'. This is a dialogue which dates from the first century A.D. It was attributed to the philosopher Cebes, a student of the Athenian Socrates. In it an ancient temple painting, which caught the attention of 2 visitors, is explained by an old man. It is an allegorical picture on which the dangers and temptations of human life are symbolically represented. It shows that happiness can only be reached by proper education and a virtuous life. This once popular ethical work is now almost forgotten. But in the 16th, 17th and 18th century it was widely read, e.g. by clergymen and preachers. The famous engravings of Goltzius and Romeyn de Hooghe of this 'tabula' are discussed above. At the end of the book we find 25 pages with notes of Jacobus Gronovius, from 1679 till his death in 1716 professor of Greek at Leiden, on the Byzantine 'paraphrasis' of the Enchiridium. These useful notes, for which he used the Codex Mediceus, were first added to the second edition of 1683. Schweighaeuser praises these notes highly: 'quae Notae (...) emendationes utique luculentas & necessarias e codice Msto Mediceo ductas continebant'. (J. Schweighaeuser, 'Epicteti Manuale etc.', Leipzig 1798, p. LIX) (Collation: *-4*8, A-S8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130459 Euro 300,00
EUCLIDES. De ses eerste boeken der beginselen van Euclides op een korte en klare manier gedemonstreert door Henrick Coets, lector in de Mathesis te Leyden. Met eene voorreden, en eenige aanmerkingen verrykt door Wilhelmus La Bordus. Den derden druck, veel verandert en verbeetert. Leiden (Te Leyden), By Samuel Luchtmans, Ordinaris Stads Drukker, 1740. 8vo. (X),435,(1 blank) p. Half calf 17.5 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 36,9,b; OiN 174) (Details: Back with 4 raised bands. Red morocco shield in the second compartment. Title in red & black. Numerous woodcut geometric illustrations in the text) (Condition: Cover worn. Back rubbed. Small tear in the head of the spine. Two old ownership entries on the title) (Note: Euclides was a Greek mathematician who lived in the 3rd cent. B.C. He wrote the most famous book in the history of mathematics, the 'Elements'. His work was intended for teaching, and follows a deductive approach. 'Euclid's fame is unquestionably attached to the success of the Elements. The number and relative antiquity of manuscript copies, the number of translations, abridged versions, and other adaptations, the variety of comments that have sprung from his text which has enjoyed a large number of editions, prove the immense significance it has had in the history and teaching of mathematics'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 345/6) § Henrick Coets, the translator of this text, was appointed professor of Mathematics (Lector der Wiskunde in het Nederduitsch) of the University at Leiden in 1701. He was to teach mathematics in Dutch. He died in 1730. He wrote also two books on sundials. (Van der Aa, 3,601) This is the 3rd revised edition produced by a successor Wilhelmus La Bordus, who was promoted to the same chair in 1734. He died in 1757. (Van der Aa, 2-1, 912)) (Provenance: Near the upper edge of the title 'B.E. Paravicini di Capelli'. The Dutchman Bartholomeus Eduard Paravicini di Capelli was born in Breda in 1724. His family was of Swiss origin. He may have used this book during his studies and later. Since 1788 he was the Chief of the artillery of the Dutch army. In 1794/95 he fought in the Allied Forces against the French army in the North of France. He died in 1810. The second name on the title is also of a gunner, and reads: 'W. Frowein, Sergeant'. He too may have read and used this book to his advantage. In the 'Nederlandsche Staatscourant' no. 240, of 25 nov. 1842, we found that one 'W. Frowein', sergeant major, was promoted by King William of the Netherlands to First Lieutenant of the second Batallion of the Artillery of Gelderland) (Collation: *6 (minus blank leaf *6); A-2D8, 2E2 (leaf 2E2 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120368 Euro 475,00
EURIPIDES. Euripides poeta, Tragicorum princeps, in Latinum sermonem conversus, adiecto e regione textu Graeco: cum annotationibus et praefationibus in omnes eius Tragoedias, autore Gasparo Stiblino. Accesserunt, Iacobi Micylli, De Euripidis vita, ex diversis autoribus collecta; item De Tragoedia & eius partibus 'prolegomena' quaedam. Item Ioannis Brodaei Turonensis Annotationes doctiss. nunquam antea in lucem editae. Ad haec, rerum & verborum toto opere praecipue memorabilium copiosus index. Cum Caes. Maiest. & Christianiss. Gallorum Regis gratia ac privilegio, ad decennium. Basel (Basileae), Per Ioannem Oporinum, (1562) (Colophon at the end: 'Basileae, Ex officina Ioannis Oporini, Anno salutis humanae 1562, mense Martio') Folio. p. 1-667; col. 668-679, (1 p.), col. 680-845; (23 index) p. Contemporary blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards. 34 cm This Euripides edition is the first to offer a Greek text accompanied by a (complete) translation into Latin. Autograph dedication by the editor on the title. (Ref: VD16 E 4217; Griechischer Geist aus Basler Pressen no. 200; Hoffmann 2,69; Schweiger 1,115; Dibdin 1,528; Moss 1,416; Brunet 2,1096; Ebert 7077; Graesse 2,519) (Details: Signed binding, produced between 1562 and 1570 by Hans Rietzsch, and probably commissioned by Prince-Bishop of Würzburg, Friedrich von Wirsberg, or his chancellor Balthasar ab Hellu. (See below for the binder and his client) Back with 4 raised bands; boards decorated with 3 rows of blind-stamped rolls, the first one with floral motives, the second and third comprising portraits of apostles and other biblical figures, and floral motives; the portraits are accompanied by short texts which are reasonably legible, e.g. King David, playing his harp, he has 'De fructu ventris tui'; This refers to Psalm 131,11, where God promisses David: 'iuravit Dominus David veritatem et non frustrabit eum de fructu ventris tui ponam super sedem suam'. Left and right of David's head the initials H and R. Another blind-stamped portrait depicts the apostle Paul, whose text is: 'Apparuit beningita(s)' (sic!), a quote from a letter of Paul to Titus. (Ep. Pauli ad Titum 3,4) The initials H.R. stand for 'Hans Rietzsch', a Würzburg bookbinder, of whom the University library of Würzburg holds a great number of bindings, which can be dated between 1555 and 1570. Rietzsch often used on 'his' boards rolls depicting King David, John the Baptist, the apostle Paul. (H. Endres, 'Die Zwickauer Buchbinder Hans Rietzsch und Gregor Schenck und ihre Beziehungen zu Würzburg', Archiv für Buchbinderei 26 (1926) p. 13-16) Woodcut printer's mark on the title of Oporinus, depicting Arion, who stands on the dolphin that saved him, he plays the violin; woodcut initials; 1 woodcut text illustration; text printed in 2 columns, Greek text with opposing Latin translation; each play is concluded with a short 'praefatio' of Stiblinus, who added also short notes; the last 185 columns contain the commentary of Johannes Brodaeus) (Condition: Vellum age-toned, spotted, scratched, and worn at the extremes; small piece gone at head of the spine; leather of the lower corner of the backcover loosening and damaged; the lower clasp has been preserved; the upper one is partly gone; small bookplate on front pastedown; ownership entry in ink same pastedown; inscription on the blank lower margin of the title; right edge of the title slightly thumbed; paper sometimes yellowing) (Note: 'With Sophokles Greek tragedy reaches its culmination. Euripides, great poet though he was, represents the first symptom of the inevitable decline, for in him we can recognize a certain impatience with the form he found ready to his hand'. This is how H.J. Rose started his chapter on Greek tragedian Euripides, ca. 480-406 B.C., some 80 years ago. (H.J. Rose, 'A history of Greek literature', p. 177 in the 4th edition of 1965) That opinion has now been superseded. Euripides' play 'The Bacchae', which drew little attention before 1900, 'has come to seem one of the defining models of Greek tragedy and even of tragedy itself, rivalling Aeschylus' Oresteia and Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus and Antigone. (The Classical Tradition, Cambridge Mass. 2010, p. 347) For this, Euripides has to thank the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. The upsurge was caused by his 'Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik' (Leipzig 1872) in which he drew attention to the idea of 'the Dionysiac', a key element in the Bacchae. This idea 'has had a massive influence not only on understandings of tragedy, but on theories of theatrical performances itself'. (The Classical Tradition) Until the end of the 18th century especially Euripides' Medea, Alcestis, Trojan women and Hippolytus, with a powerful Phaedra, created the dominant image of Euripides. He was 'admired mainly for creating icons of female suffering'. In Andromaque (1667), Iphigénie (1674) Phèdre (1677), of the French playwright Racine we see the influence of Euripides. Alcestis, a model of self sacrifice, inspired Chaucer, Milton, Woodworth, Rilke, Browning, T.S. Elliot, Yourcenar. Comparable lists can be made for Medea and Phaedra. The play 'The Trojan women', a story of women in a great war, has throughout the 20th century 'frequently been staged in times of war across the globe from Moscow to Brazil and Germany to Japan'. (The Classical Tradition). § This Euripides edition of 1562 is the first to offer a Greek text accompanied by a (complete) translation into Latin. Earlier editions of Euripides had only the bare Greek text. It furthermore is the first Euripides edition to have textual notes. It appears from the dedication that the editor, the German humanist Gasparus Stiblinus (or Gaspar Stiblin, Caspar Stiblin, Kaspar Stiblin, Kaspar Stüblin), who was born in 1526 in the South German village Amtzell, saw more male suffering in Euripides' tragedies. The 'Dedicatio' concerns the emperor Ferdinand I (1503-1564), who had supported his career. He calls Euripides the best of the tragedians, and argues that his tragedies are an emperor worthy. He stresses that Euripides is excellent reading, especially for those in power and the wealthy, for the vicissitudes of fortune which the tragedian writes about, learn the rich and powerful to prepare for misfortune and to lead a virtuous life. The world of power and the republic of letters of the 16th century is however a men's world, so Stiblinus draws the attention of the emperor to the uncertain and often cruel fate of Polynices, Eteocles, Theseus, Amphitryon, Hercules, Menelaus, Agamemnon, Odysseus, and the Cyclops. After the dedication follows a preface (ad lectorem), dated 1558, in which Stiblinus tells the reader that the Basle publisher Oporinus urged him to produce for his press a new translation for a envisaged Euripides edition. Stiblinus honestly admits that he made some use of the Latin translation of Dorotheus Camillus, which had been published in 1555 in Basel by the same Oporinus (expensis Ioannis Oporini). We may assume that Oporinus was not satisfied with the translation of Camillus, and asked Stiblinus to do a better job, for the translator boasts in the preface that his translation is more august, more reliable, and in smoother and more correct Latin. ('augustior, luculentior, et honesto ac Romano habitu commendatior', (p. a4 verso)) Stiblinus goes on to tell that while preparing the edition, the translation (which is more or less iambic) and the annotations, he was able to consult books from the library of the famous classical scholar Beatus Rhenanus (1485-1547). He did so with permission of the government of Schlettstadt, nowadays Sélestat in the Alsace. (Rhenanus had bequeathed his invaluable collection of books to his hometown Schlettstadt, where it is still to be seen in the Humanist Library of Sélestat). Stiblinus furthermore divided, he writes, each play into 5 acts to make the reading easier. He added also at the beginning of each play, and of every act, a short 'argumentum', a kind of plot-summary, and notes. He continues with the acknowledgment of his debt to Johannes Hartung, his teacher in Freiburg (praeceptorem meum), who introduced him to Euripides. He thanks him for lending him his vast collection of notes on Euripides' tragedies and references to other authors. On page 630, at the beginning of the last play, the Electra, (a play that was first published only in 1545 in Rome) Stiblinus has added a second 'praefatio', now dated Freiburg I.Br. 1560, in which he tells the reader that he inserted into his commentary on the Electra many notes of Johannes Hartung, which he dictated to his students. Stiblinus' Latin translation of the Electra is the first to appear. This 1562 edition contains furthermore 2 short texts of Jacobus Micyllus (Molsheym) of Heidelberg, who died 1558, a biography of Euripides and a treatise on tragedy. Added is also a commentary to 11 plays produced by the French scholar Johannes Brodaeus (Brodeau) of Tours, of which the title states that it was never published before. It was however published previously in Paris in 1545. As a scholar and translator of Euripides however Stiblinus met the ill fate of an Euripidean character. In the same year 1562, Holzmann published in Frankfurt a translation in prose of Euripides by the famous German humanist Philipp Melanchthon, a translation which was far better. And the Dutch scholar Willem Canter, 1545-1572, published in 1571 a Greek text that made all earlier editions obsolete. Stiblinus' edition and translation were soon forgotten. 'L'Éuripide de Stiblin avait désormais fait naufrage pour toujours dans la mer grise des entreprises manquées'. (Firpo,L. 'Les Utopies à la Renaissance', Bruxelles, Paris 1963, p. 125/26) This article of Firpo is the beginning of the Euripidean 'renaissance' of Stiblinus. Until recently little was known of Stiblinus. ADB does not know him. Zedler and Jöcher only mention a few titles of him. In VD16 we harvested for Stiblinus 17 hits: 8 own productions, among which an edition of the letters of Phalaris, and 11 contributions to works of others. The oldest title dates from 1555. Johannes Oporinus published in that year Stiblinus' works 'Coropaedia, sive de moribus et uita Virginum sacrarum, libellus planè elegans, ac saluberrimis praeceptis refertus. Eiusdem Eudaemonensium Republica Commentariolus', of which the last one, the 'Eudaemonensium Republica' ('Happinesham', in German 'Seligland') would save him from oblivion. (See hereafter for this utopian treatise) In 1559 Stiblinus was called by the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg, Friedrich von Wirsberg, 1507-1573, to teach Greek at a newly founded Paedagogium Illustre. The bishop, who wanted to revive Greek and Latin studies in his town, did so on the advice of his chancellor Balthasar ab Hellu. 'Désireux de reconstruire dans la capitale de la Franconie (Würzburg) un centre d'études, le prince-évêque Friedrich von Wrisbert (sic!) s'était adressé, peu de mois après son élection (1558), au juriste Balthazar von Hell (sic), alsacien de Haguenau, et sur son conseil appela durant l'été de 1559 'ad docenum bonas litteras ... honestis propositis praemiis' (...) notre Stiblin, pour l'enseignement du grec'. (L. Firpo, o.c. p. 126) After some delay, Stiblinus finally got his chair in Würzburg in spring 1561. His inaugural lecture, read before the bishop and other dignitaries, was on the Holy Spirit. (Firpo p. 130). Stiblinus died shortly after his appointment, probably in 1562, in Würzburg, about 36 years old. (Firpo p. 132) Stiblinus, who was of humble origin, matriculated at the University of Freiburg i.Br. on January 19th 1548. He became 'magister artium' and was immediately appointed professor of Latin in 1551 at a modest salary of 15 florins a year, 'salaire de famine' according to Firpo. (Firpo p. 110) In 1553 he fled from the Plague and went to Schlettstatt in the Alsace, where he was the next 6 years in charge of the famous humanist school, where he taught Latin, and had also time to browse and study in the library of Beatus Rhenanus. There he wrote in the summer of 1553, free from dull lecturing, (scholae molestias pertaesus) his 'Eudaemonensium Republica Commentariolus', the description of a Happy City called Eudaemonia, the capital of the utopian island Macaria, situated somewhere in the Indian Ocean. It was published by Oporinus in Basle in 1555 . This treatise makes Stiblinus the first German Utopist, and the first to create a fictional island society after Thomas More's, who published his Utopia in 1516. If Stiblinus knew More's Utopia is not sure. Interest in this forgotten 'Utopia' of Stiblinus was revived some 50 years ago by Luigi Firpo, who blew the dust from it in an article in 'Les Utopies à la Renaissance, Colloque International (avril 1961)'. Bruxelles Paris 1963, p. 117-134) His article placed Stiblinus in the current and ongoing Utopia discussion, and paved the way for the admittance of the humanist Stiblin in the cultural and literary history of Germany. (J.J. Berns in 'Literatur und Kultur im deutschen Südwesten zwischen Renaissance und Aufklärung', Amsterdam 1995, p. 153/154) Stiblinus has his own street in Amtzell, the village where he was born, the 'Kaspar-Stüblin-Weg'. (A good survey of this born again humanist in: 'Killy Literaturllexikon', Berlin/Boston, 2011, Vol. 11, p. 259/61) The interest in Stiblinus as a classical scholar was revitalized by the American Euripides expert Donald Mastronarde, Melpomene Distinguished Professor of Classics at the University of California, Berkeley, in 2009, when he launched a blog 'Stiblinus’ Prefaces and Arguments on Euripides (1562)'. In it he argues that this 'rare edition is of considerable interest for the early scholarly reception of Euripides because it includes short prefaces and plot-summaries (Latin argumenta) for each play in addition to the Greek epitomes and prefatory material transmitted in the medieval manuscripts. In contrast, most other early printed editions of tragedy simply repeat the scholarly and pedagogical annotations from the manuscripts, if they do not simply confine themselves to the text of the plays themselves'. On this website Mastronarde offers Stiblinus’ prefaces and argumenta, accompanied by an English translation, 'so that they can be studied in connection with the reception of Euripides and tragedy in the 16th century'. (ucbclassics.dreamhosters.com/djm/stiblinus/stiblinusMain.html) (Provenance: 1. Autograph inscription of Gasparus Stiblinus on the title: 'Egregio et summae spei juveni D. Balthasari ab Hellu B.A.H. amico suo chariss.(imo) Gasparus Stiblinus D. D'. From this inscription we learn that Stiblinus donated this book to his good friend Balthasar ab Hellu. Does B.A.H. simply mean 'Balthasar Ab Hellu'? We assume that Stiblinus gave him the book to thank him for his chair in Würzburg. The name, 'Ab Hellu' or in Dutch 'Van Hellu' is found in the Dutch province of Gelderland, where Hellu was a centuries old Seigniory. No mention is made of Balthasar in ADB, nor in the Dutch equivalent NNBW. Balthasar ab Hellu was a descendant of empoverished Dutch nobility. His father emigrated to the Elzas, where he found refuge in Hagenau. Balthasar was born there in 1518. He studied law in Freiburg i.Br., where he matriculated as 'Balthasarius de Heller ex Haganoia" and in 1555 he participated as 'Syndikus und Stadtschreiber' of the city of Colmar in the important 'Reichtag' of Augsburg of 1555, where it was decided 'cuius regio, eius religio', i.e. that the subjects had to adopt the religion of their ruler. In Augsburg he probably met Prince-Bishop Melchior Zobel, who engaged him in 1556 as Chancellor. As Chancellor, which meant also Prime Minister, and diplomat he travelled a lot to promote the interest of the 'Landsberger Bund', a kind of defense organisation of several states in the South of Germany. His salary (Dinstgelt) was 300 florins. (Archiv des Historische Vereins Unterfranken und Aschaffenburg, Würzburg 1840, p. 55) 'Ab 1570 musste er allerdings mehrfach Termine absagen wegen Erkrankungen, so im Oktober 1573 wegen Rückenschmerzen. Wahrscheinlich begann er aber bereits da an einem Geschwür zu leiden, denn im Oktober 1574 bezeichnete das Domkapitel den noch nicht 60jährigen bereits als 'unvermüglich und alt' und beriet über seine Ablösung. (K. Karrer, 'Johannes Posthius, (1537-1597): Verzeichnis der Briefe und Werke', Wiesbaden 1993, p. 153/154). Ab Hellu had an operation in 1575, but remained at his post till the day he died, January 9, 1577. On the internet we found the following scattered data concerning Balthasar ab Hellu, especially in volume V of the correspondence of Petrus Canisius. ('Beati Petri Canisii Societatis Iesu Epistolae et acta' , Volume V, Freiburg.Br., 1910, edited by O. Braunsberger) This volume contains Canisius' correspondence between 1565 and 1567. Canisius doesnot mention Balthasar by name, he refers to him in a few letters (letter 1259, 1290 & 1309) as the 'Cancellarius' or 'Cancellarius Herbipolensis' (= Würzburg) of the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg, Friedrich von Wirsberg. From the letters and the commentary of Braunsberger, we collected the following: Balthasar was a jurist (iuris peritus), and a strong defender of the Catholic church against the protestants. In a letter of 15 november 1565 Canisius complains that the funding of the new Collegium of the Jesuits in Würzburg did not make any progress, because the bishop was too parcimoneous (parcus, si non tenax). This, he tells, was told him by the 'Cancellarius', who asked him to convince his bishop to pump money into the project. (Letter 1259) In november 1566 we see Canisius during one of his visits to Würzburg cooperate with the 'Chancellor' in establishing the Collegium, and finding money for it. (Letter 1290) In february 1566 Canisius writes in a letter that the Chancellor opposed the plans of the bishop to mobilize troops for a war against the Turcs. This story does not end well, as we saw. We found the following epitaph for 'Balthasar de Hellu' among the occasional poetry of Johannes Posthius, 1537-1597: "Epitaphium D. BALTHASARIS AB HELLU, Cancellarii Wirzeburgici" / Balthasar hoc requiem ducit post fata sepulcro,/Qui genus a claris nobile duxit avis./Eloquio praestans, et rebus natus agendis,/Non sine laude suo praefuit officio./Novit id Herbipolis, novit Germania tota,/Huius et est magni Caesaris aula memor./Haud senio fractus, rodente sed ulcere partem/Vesicae, lenta morte miser periit./Nunc gravibus curis omnique dolore solutus/Spiritus astrigeri vivit in arce poli./ (Posthius, Johannes (1537-1597): 'Parergorum poeticorum pars altera', Heidelberg 1595, p. 201) From this epitaph we learn that Balthasar was considered to be of noble birth, known in Würzburg, yes, even through the whole of Germania; that he spoke well, and performed his tasks to the satisfaction of his bishop and the emperor, and that he died a most horrible death (probably caused by prostate or bladder cancer). Now his soul lives on peacefully in the starry sky. No mention is made in the poem of wife or children. This poem is based on first hand knowledge, for Posthius was not only a poet, but also a medicin. He was the personal physician of the Prince-Bishop. In a letter of March 1575 (letter 45) Posthius tells his addressee, his colleague Johannes Crato, the personal physician of the emperor, who had been treating 'Von Hellu', that his (Crato's) patient will pay with wine next autumn. (K. Karrer, 'Johannes Posthius, (1537-1597): Verzeichnis der Briefe und Werke', Wiesbaden 1993, p. 153) In december the next year (letter 74) Posthius writes the classical scholar Joachim Camerarius that Von Hellu is incurably ill. Posthius is looking, he writes, for a physician who can operate him, for the Chancellor suffers from 'urina purulenta'. Three weeks after this letter the poor man died. That Baltasar ab Hellu was a nobleman, and that he never forgot that his roots lay in the Netherlands, is furthermore confirmed by the Dutch bibliographer Van der Aa. He records that one 'Balthasar van Hellu', Chancellor of Würzburg, tried several times to gain possession of the above mentioned Seigniory of Hellu in the 18th century (must be 16th century) on the ground that he had old family rights to that land. ('Zelfs in het jaar 1750 (this must be 1570) deed Balthasar van Hellu, Cantzeler van Wurtzburg, verscheidene pogingen bij het hof van Gelderland, om tot het bezit der heerlijkheid te geraken, waartoe bij, uit hoofde van zijne voorouders, vermeende geregtigt te zijn'. A.J. Van der Aa, 'Aardrijkskundig woordenboek der Nederlanden', volume V, Gorichem, 1844, p. 395) We found indeed in the digital archive of the 'Hof van Gelre en Zutphen' a file (0124/2281) dated 1570, concerning the Chancellor's request to buy the seigniory of Hellu. This village, which lies a few kilometers west of Zaltbommel, was for centuries, some say from 850 A.D, the family property of 'Van Hellu's'. (A good impression of the village, nowadays called Hellouw, and its history, including the mistake of Van der Aa, are to be found at: http://www.hellouw.com/infohellouw.htm) A specimen of the Chancellor's handwriting can be admired in a letter of 1565 held in the Royal Archive in The Hague. The letter is addressed to Prince William of Orange, and in it he asks the Prince to recommend him to the Stadholder of Gelderland, because he wants to renew the ancestral ties of friendship of his father Adriaan van Hellu. (http://resources.huygens.knaw.nl/wvo/brief/4256) 2: Bookplate of the German classical scholar Otto Jahn, cut by Ludwig Richter, has been pasted on the front pastedown. Jahn, 1813-1869, had published in 1852 a biographic sketch of this successful artist. (Mittheilungen über Ludwig Richter) To thank him Richter cut for Jahn a bookplate, which he pasted from then on in his books. (See O.Jahn, 'Biographische Aufsätze', Leipzig, 1866, p. 221-287) Jahn was for the last 14 years of his life professor at Bonn. 'His work on archaeology (...) includes a large number of masterly monographs. (...) His lectures at Bonn were lucid and unadorned in style (...), there was a perfect mastery of all the details' (J.E. Sandys, 'A history of classical scholarship', vol. 3, N.Y. 1964, p. 220/21) 3: The name written on the front pastedown: 'Cary W. Bok, April 1928' is that of the American millionair Cary William Bok, 1904-1970. He was a magazine man, who tried unsuccessfully to run the huge Curtis Publishing Company (Lady's Home Journal, Saturday Evening Post)(Collation: a-z6, A-Z6. Aa-Ss6, Tt8 (leaf Tt8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151912 Euro 4500,00
EURIPIDES. Medea, treurspel naar het Grieksch van Euripides; in jambische verzen gevolgd door N.G. van Kampen. Met ophelderende aanteekeningen. Haarlem (Te Haarlem), François Bohn, 1811. 8vo. XXXII,96 p. Plain modern wrappers 22 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 37,7; OiN 176) (Details: Engraving of R. Vinkeles on the title, it depicts a raving Medea shortly before murdering her two kids) (Condition: Partly waterstained) (Note: This is the first Dutch translation of the Medea, made by Nicolaas Godfried van Kampen (1776-1839), who became professor of Dutch literature and history of the Athenaeum at Amsterdam in 1829)
Book number: 130056 Euro 40,00
EUSEBIUS. Eusebii Pamphili, Ruffini, Socratis, Theodoreti, Sozomeni, Theodori, Euagrij, & Dorothei Ecclesiastica Historia. Sex prope seculorum res gestas complectens; Latine olim a doctissimis viris partim scripta, partim e Graeco a clarissimis viris, Vuolfgango Musculo, Ioachimo Camerario & Iohanne Christophersono Brittano eleganter conversa; et nunc ex fide Graecorum codicum, sic ut novum opus videri possit, per Ioan. Iacobum Grynaeum locis obscuris innumeris illustrata, dubijs explicata, mutilis restituta; Chronographia insuper Abraham Bucholceri, ad Annum epochae christianae 1598. & lectionis sacrae historiae luculenta Methodo exornata. Cum continuatione in praesentem annum 1611. Et indicibus rerum verborumque locupletiss. Basel (Basiliae), Per Sebastianum Henripetri, n.d. (1611) Folio. (LXXX),807,(1 blank)(24 index) p. Overlapping vellum 34 cm (Ref: VD17 23:297069D; Hoffmann 2, 107)(Details: Woodcut printer's mark on the title. 'From 1496 until the seventeenth century, the Petris printed in Basel, and for three generations--Adam Petri, Heinrich Petri, and Sebastian Henripetri--the printer’s mark alluded to the family name: a stone being smashed by a godlike hammer over which fire is blown by a heavenly face. The symbolism is explained by the biblical motto (Hieremias Propheta, 23,29) printed in Greek, Latin, and Hebrew in some books, 'numquid non verba mea sunt quasi ignis ait Dominus, et quasi malleus conterens petram', 'Is not my Word like fire, like a hammer that shatters stone?' (University Library Illinois, webpage 'Windows Printers' Marks') The printer's mark is repeated on the last page; one woodcut headpiece; some woodcut initials)(Condition: Vellum soiled, some small brown stains on the frontcover; paper somewhat yellowing; bookplate on front flyleaf; short title in ink on the back)(Note: The churchfather Eusebius Caesariensis, ca. 260-339, was elected to the see of Caesarea in Asia Minor, nowadays Kayseri, in 313 A.D. He had an impressive ecclesiastial career, but his literary achievements made him immortal. His important 'Historia Ecclesiastica' (History of the Church) runs up to 324; The object of this work was to present the apostolic 'succession' of the 4 great episcopal thrones, Rome, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem, and to describe the intellectual, spiritual and institutional life of the Church, the persecutions and the heresies. 'It cannot be too strongly emphasised that Eusebius, like all early church historians, can be understood only if it be recognized that whereas modern writers try to trace the development, growth and change of doctrines and institutions, their predecessors were trying to prove that nothing of the kind ever happened. According to them the Church had had one and only one teaching from the beginning. It had been preserved by the 'succession', and heresy was the attempt of the devil to change it'. (Eusebius, the Ecclesiastical History, With an English transl. by K. Lake, Cambr. Mass., 2001, vol.1, p.XXXIV) The Latin West came to know this Greek work through the translation of 403 by Rufinus of Aquieia. The 'Historia Ecclesiastica' was first published, together with the works of the later church historians Socrates Scholasticus, Sozomenus and Theodoretus in Paris in 1544 by Robertus Stephanus. The editor of our Latin edition of 1611 is the Swiss theologian and classical scholar Joannes Jacobus Grynaeus, 1540-1617, professor at the University of Basel. He was more a theologian than a philologist. In 1570 he had already published for Henricpetri a Latin translation of the 'Opera Omnia' of Eusebius. (GG 421) In the same year, 1570, a separate edition of Grynaeus' Latin translation of the 'Historia Ecclesiastica' was published by the Basler printer Episcopius. (GG 416) Hoffmann says that our 1611 edition is a repetition of the 'Historia Ecclesiastica' edition of 1570. This cannot be correct. The titles are different and the edition of 1611 has a preface dated 1587. We found in the British Library an edition (not mentioned by Hoffmann), with exact the same title as the one of 1611, and published in 1587 in Basel by Episcopius (BL shelfmark 3627.ff.4) The only difference being that the 'Chronographia' at the end of the book has been continued till 1611. As we could not find a digital copy of the 1587 work to compare, we cannot be sure)(Provenance: A modern bookplate with the text: 'Ex libris Henn Wolfram Riedesel Freiherr zu Eisenbach'. At the top a part of the coat of arms of the Riedesel family, the head of a donkey, with 3 reed leaves in its mouth. The Riedesel Freiherren zu Eisenbach family belongs to the ancient nobility in Hesse, Germany)(Collation: alpha8, alpha6, beta6, gamma6, delta6, epsilon8; a-z6 A-Z6 Aa-Vv6 Xx8, Yy-Zz6)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 151899 Euro 675,00
EUSEBIUS. Kerkelyke geschiedenissen, zedert den dood van onzen Zaligmaker tot aan den volkomen bloeistand van 't Kristendom. Waar in van de prediking der Apostelen; de Heilige Schrift des N. Verbonds; de opvolgeren der Apostelen; de uitmuntende mannen in de vornaamste kerken, en hunne schriften; de vervolgingen; martelaren; scheuringen; ketteryen, en andere zaken, de eerste Kristen Kerk betreffende, berigt gegeven: In het Grieksch beschreven door Eusebius Pamfilus, (...). Nu vertaald en met vele aantekeningen opgehelderd door Abraham Arent Vander Meersch; (...). Amsterdam, By F. Houttuyn, 1749. 4to. Frontispiece, (XLVI),584,L,116,(36 index) p., 2 folding maps. Half roan. 27.5 cm (Ref: OiN p. 180; STCN, 14 copies, does not mention the cancel of leaf 2Y4, p. 359/360, which our copy has) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands. Frontispiece engraved and made by I.C. Philips, depicting an allegoric scene which tells about the (bloody) fight of the church against heathens and heretics. Title printed in red & black; 15 charming engravings in the text, 2 folding maps, 43x30 cm, of the Roman empire under Constantine the Great, and of Asia Minor) (Condition: Paper on the boards completely gone; leather on the back faded, rubbed & chafed; corners bumped; tear of 4 cm at foot of spine) (Note: Eusebius Caesariensis, ca. 263-339, became bishop of Caesarea in 313, shortly after the Great Persecution of christians, which lasted from 303 till 313. Eusebius was not an original thinker or historian. Nevertheless, he has 'mit Gelehrsamkeit und gründlicher Quellenkenntnis zu vielen Gebieten Beachtliches in einer grossen Anzahl von Schriften beigetragen'. (N.P. 4,310) The most important of his works is his 'Historia Ecclesiastica', the History of the Church. The first 7 books run up to 280 A.D., books 8 & 9 describe the Great Persecution, and book 10 offers the events from 313 till 324; Eusebius developed the idea that a christian emperor has, as a successor of Christ, divine power. This is the first Dutch translation of this work. The book contains also a translation of the appendix to book 8, 'De martyribus Palestinae'. Then follows a translation of 50 p. of Hieronymus' Latin version of the 'Chronicon' of Eusebius, and of its continuation by Hieronymus. At the end 116 p. of annotations by Vander Meersch. Abraham Arent vander Meersch, 1720-1792, professor of Theology and Church history at Amsterdam. He taught also philosophy. He was succeeded by Daniel Wyttenbach in 1771. (See for a vita NNBW vol. 10; and Gedenkboek van het Athenaeum en de Universiteit van Amsterdam 1632-1932, p. 684) (Collation: *-6*4 (frontispiece after leaf *1, minus leaf 6*4), A-2X4, 2Y4 (cancel leaf 2Y4), 2Z-3A4, 3B4 (chi 1 after 3B3), 3C-4D4; a-f4, g2 (minus leaf g2); A-T4 (2 maps after leaf P2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140010 Euro 220,00
EUSTATHIUS MACREMBOLITES & PARTHENIUS. Eustathii De Ismeniae & Ismenes amoribus libri XI, et Parthenii Nicaensis De amatoriis affectionibus liber unus (I. Cornario Zuiccauiensis interprete). E Graeco in latinum sermonem luculenter conversi & nunc iunctim editi. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Iacobi Marci, 1618. 8vo: (IV),378 p. 19th century overlapping vellum. 14.5 cm (Ref: STCN, only 1 copy; Hoffmann 2,115 & 3,43; Schweiger 1,123 & 223; Ebert 7167; Graesse 2,527; not in Brunet) (Details: Back gilt and edges gilt; printer's device on title) (Condition: Vellum on the lower board slightly damaged by tiny wormholes; 2 hardly visible pinpoint wormholes in the spine; some slight foxing) (Note: Almost nothing is known about the byzantine author Eustathius Macrembolites. He wrote a prose romance Hysmine & Hysminias ca. 1200. The 'editio princeps' was published in 1617 in Paris by Gilbertus Gaulminus Molinensis. The Greek text is accompanied there by his Latin translation. In the introductory letter (Lectori S.) to this Latin edition of 1618 no translator is mentioned. He must however be the translator of the 'editio princeps', for it is stated there that the translation is of recent date. The book offers texts of authors 'quos docti viri Romana lingua nuper loqui fecerunt'. (p. *2 recto) The liber of Parthenius (first century B.C.) was translated by Ianus Cornarius Zuiccauiensis (Johann Cornarius von Zwickau), 1500-1558, and first published in Basel in 1513. Cornarius, a friend of Erasmus, edited and translated Greek and Latin medical writers, and is best known for his editions and translations of Hippocrates and Galenus. On p. 297 starts a Latin translation of the 'Amores', a dialogue of Lucianus. The editor and translator of Eustathius Macrembolites, the Frenchman Gilbert Gaulmin, was a magistrat et 'érudit français', born in Moulins in 1585. He died in 1665. He was a polyglot. He knew, besides Greek and Latin, Italian, Spanish, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish. His most important works are 'De operatione dæmonum' attributed to Psellus (1615) ; this 'De Ismeniae & Ismenes amoribus' (1617); 'Les amours de Rhodanthe et de Dosiclès' of Theodorus Prodromus (1625), 'De vita et morte Mosis' (an anonymous hebrew text, 1629). His most famous publication is his 'Livre des lumières en la conduite des rois composé par le sage Pilpay' (1644). His audacious exegesis of some Bible books brought him imprisonment in the Bastille for some time. (Source for Gaulmin Wikipédia) This Latin translation of Eustathius Macrembolites of 1618 was reissued in Leiden in 1634 and 1644) (Collation: *2, A-O8 P6 Q-2A8 (leaf 2A8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120068 Euro 450,00
EUSTATHIUS MACREMBOLITES. Les Amours d'Ismene et d'Ismenias. The Hague (à La Haye), 1743. 8vo. 8, 96 p., 4 engraved plates (of which the first is a kind of frontispiece). Mottled calf. 16 cm (Ref: Not in STCN; Brunet 2,1113/4: La Haye (Paris Coustelier) 1743; Hoffmann 2,115, who adds 'Traduites du grec d'Eustathius par M. de Beauchamps. La Haye = Paris Coustelier'; Schweiger 1,123; Graesse 2,527; Ebert 7169; cf Cioranescu 31380, he numbers however 6,162 pages; the Bibliothèque Nationale has a copy with the same pagination as our copy) (Details: Back gilt, and with a red shield. Boards with tripple fillet gilt borders; title in red & black; engraving on the title: two Amores. Marbled endpapers, edges of the bookblock dyed red) (Condition: Binding scuffed; leather at the corners (and edges partly) worn away. Red shield on the back damaged. Endpapers and inner margin of 2 plates waterstained) (Note: The author of this byzantine novel, Eustathius Macrembolites, not to be confounded with Eustathius, bishop of Thessalonica, the famous commentator of Homer, lived in the second half of the 12th cent. Buchwald p. 492 about this novel: 'Gehört in die Reihe der im 12. Jh. angestellten Versuche, den griechischen Liebesroman wieder zum Leben zu erwecken. Hervorstechendes Charakteristikum ist das Bemühen des Verfassers um geistreiche Antithesen und um rhetorische Stilmittel.'; The French playwright Pierre-François Godard de Beauchamps, 1689-1761, was also a historian of drama, and a translator. His translation was first published in Paris in 1729. A reissue of the 1743 edition was published in The Hague in 1756, and in 1797 in Paris. (See Wikipédia s.v. Godard de Beauchamps) (Provenance: ownership entry of 'Henri Delafontaine' in ink on verso of front flyleaf) (Collation: a4, A-F8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120239 Euro 90,00
EUTROPIUS. Breviarium Historiae Romanae, cum metaphrasi graeca Paeanii, et notis integris El. Vineti, Henr. Glareani, Tan. & An. Fabri, Chr. Cellarii, Th. Hearnii, Ch. Aug. Heumanni, et Sig. Havercampi, item selectis Frid. Sylburgii. Accedit Rufus Festus, cum notis integris Frid. Sylburgii, Chr. Cellarii, et Sig. Havercampi. Recensuit, suasque adnotationes cum indicibus copiosissimis addidit Henricus Verheyk. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Samuelem et Joannem Luchtmans, 1762. 8vo. LIV,(76),772;(90 index) p. Calf 21 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 238643581; Schweiger 2,348 & 857; Dibdin 2,3/4; Moss 2,437/8; Fabricius/Ernesti 3,137: 'sine dubio optima editio'; Graesse 2,529; Ebert 7187) (Details: Mottled calf; gilt back with 5 raised bands; red morocco shield in second compartment) (Condition: Cover somewhat worn & scratched; head & tail of spine chafed; corners slightly bumped, a nice copy) (Note: The Roman historian Eutropius took part in the campaign of the emperor Julian against the Persians (A.D. 363), and later was 'magister memoriae' of the emperor Valens. He wrote a survey in 10 books, the 'Breviarium ab urbe condita', of Roman history till 364 A.D. 'The work is short, but well balanced, showing good judgement and impartiality. It was translated in Greek by Paenius about 380'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 424/5) His work was consulted by later christian writers. The historian Rufius Festus also wrote a Roman history. His work ends with the accession of the emperor Valens, and 'represents ultimately the epitomized Livian tradition and a compendious imperial history'. (OCD 2nd ed. 435). This 1762 edition is a socalled Variorum edition. It offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of these books sometimes overloaded with knowledge, was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The British ancient historian Edward Gibbon, 1737-1794, held Eutropius and Rufus Sextus, and also its Dutch editor Verheyk in high esteem. We only need to repeat the words of Dibdin to recommend this edition: 'This is the celebrated Variorum edition, which Mr. Gibbon declares to be 'superior to all others, even to that of Havercamp'. It is indeed a very admirable performance, and contains, besides the treasures of all preceding editions, some excellent notes of Verheyk, enlarged indexes. At page XXI and the following pages of the preface, Verheyk gives a copious account of the materials, and particularly of the MSS. from which his edition is composed. On a careful and impartial survey of the variety and excellence of the matter contained in it, we may safely pronounce it one of the very best and most elegant productions of the 18th century, and exceeded by no Variorum edition of a Roman classic.' Jan Hendrik Verheijk was Rector of the Schola Latina of Amsterdam. He died in 1784. Verheijk also produced an edition of Antonius Liberalis (1764), contributed to the Hesychius edition of Alberti (1766), and published a revised edition of the Latin/Dutch lexicon of Hannot (1771) (Van der Aa 19,168) (Collation: +-3+8, 4+4 (minus blank leaf 4+4); *-5*6; A-2K8, 2L-3D4, 3E-3K8. 3L6; a-l4 ,m1) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130419 Euro 280,00
FABER SORANUS, BASILIUS. Thesaurus eruditionis scholasticae, omnium usui et disciplinis omnibus accommodatus, post c.v. Buchneri, Cellarii, Graevii operas et adnotationes et multiplices A. STÜBELII et J.M. GESNERI curas iterum recensitus, emendatus, locupletatus. Frankfurt, Lpz., Gleditsch, 1749. Folio. (10) p., 1792;1308 columns; 198 p. Vellum 39.5 cm (Ref: Brunet 2,2/1146; Ebert 7243: the best edition; Spoelder p. 618/19: Kampen 2) (Details: Back gilt; red morocco shield on the back; gilt coat of arms of Kampen on the covers, their borders are also gilt; woodcut of Pegasus on the title.) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled; foxed; some faint waterstains; folds in French title and front flyleaf) (Note: The lexicologist Faber, 1520-1576, was 'einer der bedeutensten Schulmänner des 16. Jahrhunderts' (ADB 6,488/90). He produced a Thesaurus which long survived him. It was first published in 1571, and later revised and augmented by scholars like Cellarius and Graevius. The last and best re-edition was this edition by J.M. Gesner. All derivatives are arranged under the word from which they were derived. This really is a classical 'Fundgrube'; (Sandys II,269); the lemmata offer also translations into German; The lexicon is 'nicht blos ein Lexikon der lateinischen Sprache, sondern recht eigentlich eine Schatzkammer, die durch reiche Phraseologie, sowie durch Aufnahme von Sentenzen, Sprüchen, Geschichten etc. zu freierer Bewegung im Gebrauche des Lateinischen anleiten und nebenbei auch sonst bildende Elemente darbieten sollte' (ADB 6,489); at the end is a 198 p. 'Index germanico-latinus rerum, vocabulorum, phrasium, descriptionum & locutionum proverbialium') (Collation: a - b4 chi2 A - 5V4 chi1 A - 4M4 4N4 (minus 4N4) A - 2A4 2B2 2C2 (2C2 blank). Photographs on request.
Book number: 065451 Euro 450,00
FABRICIUS,J.A. Jo. Alberti Fabricii (...) Bibliographia Antiquaria, sive introductio in notitiam scriptorum, qui antiquitates Hebraicas, Graecas, Romanas et Christianas scriptis illustraverunt. Editio secunda, auctor, & indice duplici rerum scriptorumque locupleta. Hamburg, Leipzig (Hamburgi et Lipsiae), Impensis Christiani Liebezeit, 1716. 4to. (XIV),664,(64 index) p., 1 engraved plate. Vellum 21.5 cm (Ref: Brunet 2,1154; cf. Ebert 7274; C. Bursian, 'Geschichte der classischen Philologie', Munchen/Leipzig 1883, vol. 1, p. 360/61: 'eine Sammlung von Büchertiteln und sonstigen Notizen über hebrärische, griechische, römische und christliche Alterthümer') (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints; title in red and black; good quality paper; the edges are dyed red. This book contains a plate, engraved by 'Kraus'. This must be the German engraver Johann Ulrich Kraus, 1655-1719, or his wife Johanna Sibylla, ca. 1650-1717. 'Kraus Stil is ganz im Zeitgeschmack des Hochbarock an französischen Vorbilder orientiert'. (NDB 12 689/90) This heavily ornamented plate illustrates a chapter in the book on the Roman Apotheosis funeral rite, which led to the deification of Roman rulers and their wives. It depicts a smoking funeral pyre, in the shape of an enormous modern wedding cake; the pyre is surrounded by Roman soldiers, priests etc. In most copies we know of this book this plate is bound before the title, and functions there as a kind of frontispiece) (Condition: Vellum soiled; right margin of the title is thumbed; the turn-in strip on the outer margin of inside of the backcover is loosening) (Note: The late 17th century was for classical scholarship the age of epigones, men who were more compilators than great scholars. Classical scholars started to produce (often voluminous) editions of Greek and Latin authors, packed 'cum notis Variorum', others produced enormous surveys and summaries, for instance classicists like Jacobus Gronovius, who published his 13 volume 'Thesaurus Antiquitatum Graecarum' (1697/1703), and Johannes Georgius Graevius, who compiled a 'Thesaurus Antiquitatum Romanarum', (1694-1699) in 12 huge volumes. Such processing of knowledge was only useful, because 'sie literarische Zeugnisse für zahllose Einzelerscheinungen des antiken Lebens, grosse und ganz geringe, mit saurem Schweisse sammelte und nach Kräften ordnete'. (U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Geschichte der Philologie, Lpz./Bln. 1921, p. 33) Wilamowitz, perhaps the greatest classical scholar ever, strongly disapproved of this kind of scholarship, because 'Vielwisserei' hampered progress. 'Wo das Können immer schwacher ward, galt das Wissen immer mehr, Polyhistorie war das Höchste, was man anstrebte. (...) Polymathie schafft keinen Verstand, hat schon Herakleitos gesagt'. (Wilamowitz, p. 34). A Polymath in the flesh was the German classical scholar and bibliographer Johann Albert Fabricius, 1668-1736, a man 'von staunenswerthem Fleiss und unermesslicher Belesenheit' (Bursian p. 360). He was a celebrated bibliographer, and among the foremost among the German classical scholars of his time. His chef-d'oeuvre is the 'Bibliotheca Graeca', a bibliographic survey of Greek literature (1705-1728). This work numbers 14 volumes. It displays an immense learning, and supplied the basis for all subsequent histories of Greek literature. It's bibliographic data are still useful for classical scholars. His 3 volume 'Bibliotheca Latina' (1708-1721) is on a more modest scale. Nevertheless, it still is a useful work of reference. Its last edition of 1773-1774 is still consulted by scholars, librarians and antiquarian booksellers, and it is more than once repeated by later bibliographers, like Schweiger, Dibdin or Moss. Fabricius also produced a 'Bibliotheca Latina Ecclesiastica' (1718), and a 5 volume 'Bibliotheca Latina Mediae et Infimae Aetatis' (1734-1736). Johann Albert Fabricius began to teach on the Gymnasium at Hamburg in 1699, and remained there until his death. There he collected 'in stiller mühsamer Einzelarbeit' his bibliographic material for Greek, Latin, Byzantine, and Medieval Latin literature. The NDB does not speak of the suffocation caused by the compiling 'epigones', but is full of praise. 'Diese zuverlässige, wohlgeordnete Sammelarbeit war unschätzbar nicht nur als Grundlage für die historische und kritische Arbeit der folgenden Generationen von Gelehrten, sodern auch als Arsenal für unsere Klassiker'. (NDB 4,732/33) NDB concludes with the statement that Fabricius equals 'doch als Polyhistor von unwahrscheinlicher Fruchtbarkeit' the great Leibniz. (steht in der Nähe des grossen Leibniz) The pupils on Fabricius' Gymnasium must have been diligent and brilliant, because he tells in the preface to this 'Bibliotheca Antiquaria' that it is a collection of private lectures, held for youngster who visited his school. It is a kind of encyclopedia, the approach of which is thematic. It consists of notices of the authors who had published on Jewish, Greek, Roman and ecclesiastical antiquities. For instance on 'antiquitates graecae' he refers to the general survey works of importance, including a 19 page table of contents of the 'Thesaurus Antiquitatum Graecarum' of Gronovius. The first 4 chapters discuss general works of writers on Jewish, Greek, Roman and christian antiquities. Chapter 5 is on geography, 6 on works describing ancient Rome, 7 on chronology, 8 on gods and saints, 9 on altars, temples, sacred places, 10 on 'Festus', 11 on sacrifices and rituals, 12 on divination, miracles and magic, 13 on priests and clerics, 14 on 'De re publica', 15 on law, 16 on taxes, measures and weights, 17 on militaria and nautica, 18 on clothes, 19 on food and convivia, 20 on marriage and family, 21 on school and education, 22 on Games, monuments and buildings, 23 is on death. The elaborate 'index rerum' and 'index scriptorum' are useful tools to find one's way in this farrago of names, titles and other interesting data) (Collation: *4 (minus leaf *4), 2*4; A-Z4, Aa-Zz4; Aaa-Zzz4, Aaaa-Yyyy4 (after Ll2, page 267/8, has been bound a plate, which other copies have before the title as a kind of frontispiece) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130453 Euro 400,00
FESTUS & M. VERRIUS FLACCUS. M. Verrii Flacci quae extant et Sex. Pompei Festi de Verborum significatione libri XX. Cum vetusto Bibliothecae Farnesianae exemplari Romae nuper edito, collati; ex quo lacunae pene omnes sunt suppletae. In eos libros Ant. Augustini annotationes, ex editione Veneta, J. Scaligeri castigationes recognitae, ex Parisiensi, F. Ursini notae, ex Romana. Accesserunt nunc denique doctissimorum virorum notae ex eorum scriptis hinc inde collectae. (Bound with:) Q. Asconii Pediani Patavini Commentationes in aliquot orationes M. Tullii Ciceronis. (...) Francisci Hotomani studio & diligentia post omnes omnium editiones quam emendatissimae. (...) Eiusdem Hotomani expositiones suae in Asconium operae & diligentiae. Ad 1: (Genève), Apud Petrum Santandreanum, 1593. Ad 2: Lyon (Lugduni), Apud Joan. Tornaesium & Gul. Gazeium, 1551. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: Ad 1: (XVI),CCCIX,(1 blank),(23 index),(1); LXXV,(1 blank),(10),CCXVI,(22 = index),(4),84 (recte 80) p. Ad 2: (XXIV),171,(1) p. H.leather. 17 cm (Ref: Ad 1: GLN-3651; Schweiger II,1135; Bernays, see p. 258/59 & 279; Ad 2: A. Cartier, Bibliographie des éditions des Tournes, no. 185; Schweiger I,18) (Details: 2 Back with 5 raised bands, and a black shield; Ad 1: 'Veritas' printer's device on the title: a woman, the naked truth, seated on a cubus, holding a radiant sun in her right hand. In her left hand she holds an opened book and a palm leaf. Her feet rest on the globe; the garland of fruit which surrounds her shows a ribbon with a motto in Greek: 'Alêtheia Pandamatôr', i.e. 'Allmighty Truth'. Ad 2: completely printed in italics; engraved printer's mark on title, a 'Ouroboros', with motto: 'quod tibi fieri non vis, alteri ne feceris', type no. 5. (See Cartier p. 40); Prism mark, type d on the verso of the last leaf, with motto 'Nescit labi virtus' (See Cartier p. 42) (Condition: Back rubbed; corners bumped; paper on covers slightly worn; a few small wormholes in the second half of the first work only; occasional faint pencil underlinings; old ownership entry at the upper margin of the title of Asconius erased; first title slightly soiled) (Note: Ad 1: Festus is a 2nd century abbreviator of a lost lexicographic work by Marcus Verrius Flaccus, dating from the first century B.C. Remains of his work survive in Festus; J.J. Scaliger, 1540-1609, produced a highly acclaimed edition in 1575. He was praised for his success at completing blank portions of the Farnese manuscript. The editor uses both Paulus Diaconus and Festus for a reconstruction of the text in strict alphabetical order, from A to V; Bernays tells us that the 216 pages with the 'Castigationes' of Scaliger are 'unverändert abgedruckt' in this edition of 1593 (Bernays p. 279). Scaliger's notes are followed by the notes of lesser gods, but nevertheless 'docti viri'. Ad 2: Asconius Pedianus, probably 3-88 A.D, produced for his sons a historical commentary on a number of the orations of the Roman politician/orator Cicero, the Verrines, pro Cornelio, contra M. Antonium & Catilinam, contra Pisonem, pro Scauro, & pro Milone. François Hotman, 1524-1590, was a French protestant jurist and author) (Provenance: Engraved bookplate of Jonkheer Henri de Brauw, depicting his coat of arms) (Collation: Festus: q - 2q8, a - v8 x8 (minus x8 blank); A - V8 X2; 2A - 2E8 2F2. Asconius: a - m8 n4 (lacking the blanks n3 and n4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120230 Euro 800,00
FESTUS & M. VERRIUS FLACCUS. Sexti Pompei Festi De verborum significatione fragmentum. Ex vetustissimo exemplari Bibliothecae Farnesianae descriptum. Schedae quae Festi fragmento detractae apud Pomponium Laetum extabant. Ex bibliotheca Fulvi Ursini. Notae in Sex. Pompei Festi fragmentum, schedas & epitomam. (Genève), apud Petrum Santandreanum, 1583. 8vo. (1),196,(18),62 p. Vellum 17 cm (Ref: 1 GLN 3005; Schweiger 2,354, Smitskamp 60) (Details: Six thongs laced through the joints. Printer's mark on the title. Veritas printer's device on the title: a woman, the naked truth, seated on a cubus, holding a radiant sun in her right hand; in her left hand she holds an opened book and a palm leaf; her feet rest on the globe; the garland of fruit which surrounds her shows a ribbon with the text in Greek: Alêtheia Pandamatôr, i.e. Allmighty Truth). (Condition: Vellum partly soiled. Right margin of title slightly thumbed; title slightly browning) (Note: Festus is a 2nd century grammarian, who produced an abbreviation of a lexicographic work by Marcus Verrius Flaccus, a wellknown antiquarian and grammarian living in Augustan Rome. Verrius compiled an enormous lexicon in 80 books, full of unusual, difficult, and archaic words, with discussions about customs, political institutions, belief and Roman law. Remains of his work survive in the epitome of 20 books made by Sextus Pompeius Festus. Festus also added examples found in other sources; the original work of Verrius is completely lost, and only 1 manuscript of Festus survived the Middle Ages in an heavily mutilated form. The first reliable text, which was a great improvement compared to earlier editions was published in 1559 by Antonio Agustin, 1517-1586, who made good use of the Farnese manuscript at Naples, and aimed at reconstructing the text in a strict alphabetical order from A to V, with the help of other Medieval epitomes of Festus. GLN 15-16 states that this edition is a reissue of an edition published in 1581 in Rome. According to Smitskamp 60 Fulvius Ursinus simply reproduces Scaliger's edition without mentioning his name. In the praefatio to the 62 pages with learned notes the reader is assured that this edition (of 1583) is a faithful transcription of the sole surviving MS of Festus) (Collation: A-N8, O4; A-C8, D8 (minus leaf D8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120331 Euro 500,00
FESTUS & M. VERRIUS FLACCUS. M. Verrii Flacci quae extant. Et Sex. Pompei Festi De verborum significatione libri XX. Cum vetusto Bibliothecae Farnesianae exemplari Romae nuper edito, collati; ex quo lacunae pene omnes sunt suppletae. In eos libros Ant. Augustini annotationes, ex editione Veneta, Io. Scaligeri castigationes recognitae, ex Parisiensi, Ful. Ursini notae, ex Romana. Accesserunt nunc denique doctissimorum virorum notae ex eorum scriptis hinc inde collectae. Paris (Parisiis), Apud Arnoldum Sittart, 1584. 8vo (XXVIII),CCCIX,(1 blank),(22 index),(2 blank); LXXV,(1 blank),(10),CCXVI,(24 index),84 p. Limp vellum 17 cm (Ref: Smitskamp 61; Schweiger 2,355 & 1134; Brunet 5,2 1148; Renouard-1926, n° 1044 (Renouard et alii, 'Imprimeurs et libraires parisiens du XVIe siècle', Paris, 1964)) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Engraved printer's mark of Arnoldus Sittart on the title, his motto: 'Finis coronat opus', 'the end crowns the work'. (BaTyR : Base de Typographie de la Renaissance, no. 28409) The printer's mark shows the coat of arms of Cologne, the city where Arnoldus Sittart was born: the escutcheon bears 3 crowns and beneath them are twelve drops; the escutcheon is supported by a standing crowned griffin and idem lion; above the shield a helmet with peacock feathers as crest. (See for an explanation Wikipedia 'Kölner Wappen') (Condition: The vellum is probably recycled from another book; that is why the cover is wrinkled, dog-eared, slighlty soiled, and cut short. A small piece of the outer-edge of the backcover has gone. Three names and a small inscription on the title, 1 name has been erased. Partly slightly waterstained at the lower margin. Some hardly visible pinpoint wormholes near the right lower corner of one quarter of the book) (Note: Festus is a 2nd century grammarian, who produced an abbreviation of a lexicographic work by Marcus Verrius Flaccus, a wellknown antiquarian and grammarian living in Augustan Rome. Verrius compiled an enormous lexicon in 80 books, full of unusual, difficult, and archaic words, with discussions about customs, political institutions, beliefs and Roman law. Remains of his work survive in the epitome of 20 books made by Sextus Pompeius Festus. Festus also added examples found in other sources; an other epitome of this epitome of Festus was made in the 9th century by the historian Paulus Diaconus. The original work of Verrius is completely lost, and only 1 manuscript of Festus survived the Middle Ages in a heavily mutilated form. The first reliable text, which was a great improvement compared to earlier editions was published in 1559 by Antonio Agustin, 1517-1586, who made good use of the Farnese manuscript at Naples. He also added a commentary. It remained dominant for 2 centuries. Fulvius added in this edition suggestions concerning Greek material. J.J. Scaliger, 1540-1609, produced a highly acclaimed edition in 1575. He was praised for having successfully completed the gaps and damaged passages of the Farnese manuscript. Grafton says about this edition that 'fluency in conjecture and attention to detail could hardly be raised to a higher level'. (A. Grafton. Joseph Scaliger, a study in the history of classical scholarship, Oxf. 1983, vol. 1, p. 134/160) This edition of 1584 repeats Scaliger's of 1575. The text of Agustin is also printed, followed by 75 p. with his annotations, and followed by a 216 p. commentary by Scaliger; at the end we find the notes of Ursinus) (Collation: +6, *8, a-x8, A-V8, X2, 2A-2E8, 2F2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120133 Euro 600,00
FESTUS & M. VERRIUS FLACCUS. Sex. Pompei Festi et Mar. Verrii Flacci De verborum significatione lib. XX. Notis et emendationibus illustravit Andreas Dacerius in usum Delphini. Accedunt in hac nova editione notae integrae Josephi Scaligeri, Fulvii Ursini, & Antonii Augustini, cum fragmentis & schedis, atque indice novo. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Sumptibus Huguetanorum, 1699. 4to. (XXXII including frontispiece),596,(4),96,(24 index) p. Vellum 25 cm (Ref: Schweiger 355; Brunet 4,798) (Details: Short title in ink on the back; 6 thongs laced through covers; frontispiece: Arion jumping from his ship while playing the lyre, and being watched by the dolphin that would save him; at the bottom a portrait of Festus, flanked by sea deities; at the top 2 angels presenting the coat of arms of the Dauphin, the heir to the throne of France; title in red & black, and with the engraved coat of arms of the Dauphin) (Condition: Vellum soiled and scratched; small tear of 1 cm at the head of the front joint; waterstain at upper part of front flyleaf and frontispiece. Large waterstains in upper corner of six leaves)(Note: Festus is a 2nd century abbreviator of a lexicographic work by Marcus Verrius Flaccus, dating from the first century B.C.; the edition and commentary of Festus is the starting point of the career of the French classical scholar André Dacier, 1651-1722. He follows the texts proposed by Agustin and Scaliger, and aimed at presenting a clear and educationally useful text. Dacier says that he wants to present the prince useful information about Roman law, ancient treaties, foundations of power, the royal laws of Rome, etc. Its interest lies in the realia, not in its literary worth. Dacier was the first to publish a readable text of Festus. (See 'La collection Ad usum Delphini' vol. 2, Grenoble, 2000/5, p. 263/72). It was first published in Paris in 1681, repeated in 1692, and published in 1699 and in 1700 with additions of great scholars like Scaliger by the Huguetani. Brunet calls this Amsterdam edition 'recherchée') (Collation: *4 (including frontispiece) 2*-4*4, A-4X4) (Photographs on request.)
Book number: 140081 Euro 270,00
FESTUS & M. VERRIUS FLACCUS. De verborum significatione lib. XX. Notis et emendationibus illustravit Andreas Dacerius in usum Delphini. Accedunt in hac nova editione notae integrae Josephi Scaligeri, Fulvii Ursini, & Antonii Augustini, cum fragmentis & schedis, atque indice novo. Amst., sumptibus Huguetanorum, 1700. 4to. (32 incl. frontispiece),596,(4),96,(24 index) p. Vellum 25 cm (Ref: Schweiger 355; Brunet 4,798) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands. Blind stamped borders on covers. Frontispiece showing the jump of Arion from his ship while playing the lyre, and being watched by the dolphin that would save him; at the bottom a portrait of Festus, flanked by 2 sea deities; at the top 2 angels presenting the coat of arms of the Dauphin, the heir to the throne of France; title in red & black, and with the engraved coat of arms of the Dauphin) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled. Front joint starting to split for 1 cm at the head) (Note: Festus is a 2nd century abbreviator of a lexicographic work by Marcus Verrius Flaccus, dating from the first century B.C.; the edition and commentary of Festus is the starting point of the career of the French classical scholar André Dacier, 1651-1722. He follows the texts proposed by Agustin and Scaliger, and aimed at presenting a clear and educationally useful text. Dacier says that he wants to present the prince useful information about Roman law, ancient treaties, foundations of power, the royal laws of Rome, etc. Its interest lies in the realia, not in its literary worth. Dacier was the first to publish a readable text of Festus. (See 'La collection Ad usum Delphini' vol. 2, Grenoble 2000/5, p. 263/72). The edition was first published in Paris in 1681, repeated in 1692, and published in 1699 and in 1700 with additions of great scholars like Scaliger by the Huguetani. Brunet calls this Amsterdam edition 'recherchée') (Collation: *4 (including frontispiece) 2*-4*4, A-4X4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140075 Euro 300,00
FICORONI, Francesco. Francisci Ficoronii, Reg. Lond. Acad. Socii, dissertatio de larvis scenicis et figuris comicis antiquorum romanorum ex italica in latinam linguam versa. Editio secunda, auctior et emendatior. Roma, Sumptibus Venantii Monaldini, typis Angeli Rotilii, 1754. 4to. (XII),115,(5 index) p., 85 engraved plates, of which 1 folding. H.calf 29 cm (Ref: Brunet 2,1245; Sandys 2,380; Ebert 7528) (Details: Spine with 5 gilt and ruled raised bands, second compartment with lettered red morocco label; title in red & black; engraving on title: a man with a pig's head on the run in a landscape; engraved headpiece and initial on first page; the 85 engravings by Francesco Marroni and Silvio Pomarede show masks and actors wearing masks; the engravings are after ancient mosaics, gemmae, cameos, paintings, bronzes etc.; paper with wide uncut margins) (Condition: Cover scuffed; small piece at head of spine gone; back with crackles; round bookplate on front pastedown) (Note: 'The early 18th century saw an exceptionally active international trade in ancient coins and antiquities and the formation of a number of significant collections assembled by aristocratic amateurs, scholarly gentlemen and cunning dealers throughout Europe. The centre of the antiquities trade was Rome, teeming with dealers who purchased the many coins, gems and other objects found daily in excavations in the city or in the fields of the Roma campagna'. (J. Spier & J. Kagan, 'Sir Charles Frederick and the forgery of ancient coins in 18th century Rome', (Journal of the history of collections 12,1 (2000) p. 35) This was the biotope of the Italian Francesco de Ficoroni, 1664-1747, one of the most prominent antiquaries at the beginning of the 18th century, who combined the trade in antiquities with serious archaeological, antiquarian and topographical research. He was the Roman antiquary best known to English visitors, who acted also as scholarly guide and trader for wealthy gentlemen, students and scholars on their Grand Tour through Italy. His latest work, 'Vestigia, e rarità di Roma antica' (1744), was in fact a kind of guidebook, which supplied an instructive conspectus of the topography and the monuments. For his researches and services he was made Fellow of the Royal Society in London. Ficoroni sold antiquities to a vast number of collectors, e.g. the king of Poland, for whom he acquired the collection of Roman sculpture, now in Dresden. He earned his eternal fame, and the eternal gratitude of Italy, as the discoverer and first owner of the so-called bronze 'Ficoroni cista' of Praeneste, a funerary object which is now in the Villa Giulia at Rome. He did not want to sell this vessel, not even for a fortune, to the above mentioned Sir Charles Frederick, but it was his wish that it would always stay in Rome, to be admired in the Collegio Romano. He was not always an impeccable philanthropist, or honest trader, for he had on occasion troubles with the authorities for dubious transactions, e.g. trading in stolen goods, or illegally excavated objects. In 1736 Ficoroni published in Rome a richly illustrated monography on theatrical comic masks and comic figures in Roman art, 'Le maschere sceniche e le figure comiche d'antichi Romani, brevemente descritti'. In 1750 a Latin translation of this work was produced. Our copy is the second and best edition of that Latin translation. All the masks and other objects are discussed in detail. The engravings were made by Silvio Pomarede and Francesco Marroni. (Both Ficoroni and his 'cista Ficoroni' have their own lemma in Wikipedia, but the above mentioned article, with a nice portrait of Ficoroni, is much more informative. It should be added that Ficoroni had nothing to do with the forgery of ancient coins)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown pasted an armorial bookplate: 'E Bibliotheca A.C. de Novavilla'. The plate shows a winged helmet with an eagle (griffin?) on top; below the helmet a shield with a cross having an ancre in its centre; in the 4 quarters a tower. The coat of arms is probably of one 'Neville', or 'Neuville'; the lithographed bookplate seems to be English) (Collation: a6, A - P4, 85 plates. Plates 40 & 41 have been switched.) Photographs on request.
Book number: 103504 Euro 600,00
FRIESEMAN,H. Nieuw Nederduitsch-Latijnsch woordenboek, door H. Frieseman, lid van het Utrechtsche Genootschap van Kunsten en Wetenschappen en Rector van het Veluwsche Gymnasium te Harderwijk. Zutphen, Bij H.C.A. Thieme, 1810. 8vo. 2 volumes: VIII,1448 p. Contemporary boards 17 cm (Details: Marbled paper on cover) (Condition: Binding worn, especially at the extremities) (Note: Hendrik Frieseman, ca. 1755-1821, was the last rector of the Schola Latina of Harderwijk from 1805 till 1814. The school had only 6 pupils when it closed down. The Schola Latina had become obsolete and lost pupils to the local French school; Frieseman published also the first complete translation into Dutch of Thucydides in 1786. (OiN p. 372) (Onderzoek naar zeventien Gelderse Latijnse scholen. Zutphen, 1985 p. 287) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120134 Euro 60,00
GELL,W. & J.P. GANDY. Pompeiana: the topography, edifices, and ornaments of Pompeii. London, Printed for Rodwell & Martin, 1817 - 1819. Large 8vo. XXXI,(1);273,(1 blank & 2 p.: last but one p. filled with corrections; last p. with 'directions for the binder'); engraved illustrations in the text. (4),77 (i.e. 75) leaves with plates. Three-quarter red morocco. 24,5 cm (Details: Nice copy of the first edition of this first study in English of the excavation of Pompei. Back gilt, and with 5 raised bands, gilt short title in second compartment. Covers and endpapers marbled; upper edge painted red; The four preliminary plates which are called for in the list of plates on p. XXIX/XXXI, are unnumbered. The first is a frontispiece, being an added engraved title, dated 1819. The 4th unnumbered plate consists of 2 fold. plates, forming together a 'plan of the city of Pompeii as excavated to the year 1819'; 2 of the numbered plates are folded, and 1 is double-page; two plates include no. 54-55 and 56-57; plate 75 is coloured; our copy has the corrected version of plate 43, as indicated in the 'directions to the binder')(Condition: Both lower corners are slightly grazed; some foxing on the plates; our copy is lacking 1 preliminary leaf with the half-title, reading 'Pompeiana' on the recto, and 'Printed by T. Davison, Whitefriars' on the verso)(Note: William Gell, 1777-1836, English classical archaeologist. Travelled widely through Greece, Asia Minor and Italy. In 1807 he was elected Member of the Society of Diletanti, and Member of the Royal Society. His drawings of classical ruins and localities are executed with great detail and exactness, and are preserved in the British Museum. Pompeiana is his best known work. In the preface it is stated that the original drawings were made by Sir William Gell with the camera lucida. This optical device is a drawing aid for artists and was patented in 1806 by the English scientist William Hyde Wollaston. It consists of a prism, and lenses (see Wikipedia: camera lucida)) (Collation: a-b8, B-S8, T2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140146 Euro 650,00
GELLIUS. A. Gellii luculentissimi scriptoris Noctes Atticae. Nunc denuo ab infinitis quibus scatebant mendis, summa ac diligenti cura repurgatae, atque pristinae integritati restitutae. Venice, (Venetiis), Apud Hieronymum Scotum, 1569. 8vo. (XVI),543,(1 blank) p. 18th/19th century half vellum 16 cm (Ref: Edit16, CNCE 20612; Not in Schweiger, Didbin, Moss, Ebert, Graesse, Brunet or Fabricius/Ernesti) (Details: Evidently a rare book. Not a single copy in Rare Book Hub (Americana Exchange). KVK (Karlsruher Virtueller Katalog) refers only to copies in Italian libraries. Marbled boards. Printer's mark on the title, depicting a winged leopard (a kind of griffin) carrying a winged orb or ball. Woodcut initial at the beginning of each of the 20 books. Printed almost completely in italics. At the end is a 35 page list of Greek passages found in the text with their translation into Latin, called dictionum graecarum interpretatio) (Condition: Cover slightly worn, especially to the extremes; back slightly spotted and soiled with some faint pencil stripes. Ownership entry on the lower part of the title erased. A pinpoint wormhole in the right upper corner of the last 4 leaves, far away from the text) (Note: The Venetian publishing firm of the Scotto family printed in the 16th century in 2 fields, it specialised in the printing of music and texts of the Latin classics. The Scotto firm contributed also in the area of Aristotelian studies. The most important of this printing dynasty is Girolamo Scotto, or Hieronymus Scotus. He composed music himself, but he is best known as the most inflential music printer of the Renaissance. He has even a lemma in wikipedia. When Girolamo took over in 1539 the firm had already earned great finance with classic texts, Latin translations and commentaries by various humanists. He made however a huge fortune with mass produced music. Still he continued to print texts of classical authors. An example is this Gellius edition. It has some remarkable features, it looks exactly like a Gryphius edition. It imitates the handy small format, the lay-out, the italic fypeface, the catch-words and the lectiones variantes printed in the margins, of the Gellius editions which Gryphius had published earlier. The books of this Lyonaise firm were often cheap pirated reprints of successfull texts, which were sold all over Europe. It seems that the Scotto firm tried to imitate the Gryphius edition to join in its success. Scotto even had the nerve of repeating verbatim the title of the Gellius edition of Gryphius which was published in 1556. Remarkable is that the editor of the Scottus edition very often took the trouble of swapping the lectio varians printed in the margin of the Gryphius edition and the reading in the text. The Scotus edition repeats almost verbatim the dictionum graecarum interpretatio of the Gryphius edition at the end, including the Ad lectorem. Scotus perhaps produced this edition solely for the Italian market, for KVK records only copies in Italian libraries) (Provenance: Old name on the lower margin of the title erased, difficult to read: Caesaris Crispoliti Perugini. We found one Caesar Crispolitus, or Cesare Crispolti, 1563-1608, a Perugian local historian, a jurist and canon of the Perugian cathedral. He is best known for his Perugia augusta descritta which was published posthumously in 1648. He was once the owner of a manuscript now in the Biblioteca comunale Augusta of Perugia, Manoscritti, 1058. He is described there as I.U.D., Iuris Utriusque Doctor. The library holds some manuscripts with lectures he held at the local Accademia. See manus.iccu.sbn.it//opac_SchedaScheda.php?ID=0000188440. His Raccolta delle cose segnalate, of 1597, one of the oldest guide to Perugia, was republished in 2001 by Olschki as «Raccolta delle cose segnalate» di Cesare Crispolti. La più antica guida di Perugia (1597). 1604 saw his dissertation Idea dello scolare che versa negli studi affine di prendre il grado del Dottorato) (Collation: *8, A - 2L8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120517 Euro 725,00
GELLIUS. Auli Gellii Noctes Atticae. Editio nova et prioribus omnibus docti hominis cura multo castigatior. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Apud Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1651. 12mo. (XLVIII),498,(122 index) p. 19th cent. marbled boards. 13 cm (Ref: Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 261; Willems 1127: 'Édition fort jolie et qui passe pour très correcte'; Berghman 2065 ; Rahir 1145; Graesse 3,46; Ebert 8287; Dibdin 1,340/41; Fabricius/Ernesti 3,10: 'emendatissima editio'; Schweiger 2,378: 'Neue, werthvolle Recens. nach Handschr. von Jo.Frd. Gronovius'; Brunet 2,1524: 'Jolie édition') (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints; engraved title, depicting a learned writer at work under the light of an oil lamp) (Condition: Cover worn at the extremities; marbled paper on the back scuffed; lower corner of a few leaves vaguely waterstained; without the last two blank leaves. Paper somewhat yellowing) (Note: A favorite author of the Renaissance. The Latin author Aulus Gellius, ca. 125-180 AD, was never counted as a major author in antiquity, nor later. His only work 'Noctes Atticae' or 'Attic Nights', is a miscellany that 'ranges from literature to law, from wondrous tales to moral philosophy; one of his favorite topics is the Latin language'. (...) The exposition, in a mildly archaizing but never difficult Latin, often takes the form of dialogues with or between culturally eminent persons whom Gellius had known'. It derives its name from the fact of its having been written during the long nights of a winter which the author spent in Attica as a young itinerant student. The Noctes Atticae were exploited by pagans and Christians alike in late antiquity. In medieval florilegia he is much quoted for piquant tales and moral sentiments. 'From Petrarch onward Gellius became a favorite author of the Renaissance'. 'More than 100 manuscripts were copied'. He was used as a valuable source of information on the Latin language, and had preserved numerous quotations from lost authors, which were presented with grace and elegance. Gellius became a model for the 'Miscellanea' of the Italian humanist Angelo Poliziano. 'In the 18th century, however, new canons of elegance caused his style to seem less attractive, and compilation sank to minor merit' (Quotations from 'The Classical Tradition', Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 386/7) The 20 books of the Noctes Atticae were ably edited 'cura docti hominis'. This learned editor was the Dutch classicist of German origin Johann Friedrich Gronov, or Gronovius, 1611-1671, He was the successor of Heinsius at the University of Leiden, and he was influenced by Vossius, Grotius, Heinsius & Scriverius. His editions mark an epoch in the study of Livy, of Seneca, Tacitus & Gellius. (Sandys, History of Classical Scholarship, 2,321) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in ink the name of 'Berend van Marle' or 'Barend van Marle', and in pencil the name of a collector of Elzeviers 'J. van Dijck') (Collation: * - 2*-12; A - 2C-12 (lacking the blanks 2C11 & 2C12) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120071 Euro 225,00
GELLIUS. Auli Gellii Noctes Atticae; Editio nova et prioribus omnibus docti hominis cura multo castigatior. Amsterdam, Apud Joannem Janssonium a Waesberge et Elizaeum Weyerstraet, 1666. 12mo. (XLVIII),498,(122 index) p. Vellum 13.5 cm (Ref: Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 261; This is a line for line reprint of the Elzevier-edition of 1651, cf. Willems 1127; cf. also Dibdin 1,340/41; cf. Fabricius/Ernesti 3,10: 'emendatissima editio'; cf. Schweiger 2,378; Ebert 8287; Graesse 3,46; ) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Engraved title, depicting a learned writer at work, one of the Muses stands behind him and points at a crowd outside (the author's house?), possibly a crowd of all the great men he had known) (Condition: Vellum age-toned. Small wormhole in the lower margin of the first 4 leaves; small stamp on recto of leaf *3. Small wormhole in the front and rear endpapers) (Note: The Latin author Aulus Gellius, ca. 125-180 AD, was never counted as a major author in antiquity, nor later. His only work Noctes Atticae or Attic Nights, is a miscellany that 'ranges from literature to law, from wondrous tales to moral philosophy; one of his favorite topics is the Latin language'. (...) The exposition, in a mildly archaizing but never difficult Latin, often takes the form of dialogues with or between culturally eminent persons whom Gellius had known'. It derives its name from the fact of its having been written during the long nights of a winter which the author spent in Attica as a young itinerant student. The Noctes Atticae were exploited by pagans and Christians alike in late antiquity. In medieval florilegia he is much quoted for piquant tales and moral sentiments. 'From Petrarch onward Gellius became a favorite author of the Renaissance'. 'More than 100 manuscripts were copied'. He was used as a valuable source of information on the Latin language, and had preserved numerous quotations from lost authors, which were presented with grace and elegance. Gellius became a model for the Miscellanea of the Italian humanist Angelo Poliziano. 'In the 18th century, however, new canons of elegance caused his style to seem less attractive, and compilation sank to minor merit' (Quotations from 'The Classical Tradition', Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 386/7) § The 20 books of the Noctes Atticae were ably edited by the Dutch classicist of German origin Johann Friedrich Gronov, or Gronovius, 1611-1671, He was the successor of Heinsius at the University of Leiden, and he was influenced by Vossius, Grotius, Heinsius & Scriverius. His editions mark an epoch in the study of Livy, of Seneca, Tacitus & Gellius. (Sandys, History of Classical Scholarship, 2,321) At the end an Interpretatio Graecarum dictionum of 32 p., which consists of a list of the Greek words and phrases in the text followed by a translation into Latin. At the very end 4 pages with conjectures of several scholars) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf the name of 'Dr. Thormeyer'. This might be the German philologist Christian Friedrich Thormeyer, who was in 1830 Direktor of the Gymnasium of Neu-Ruppin. In 1793 he published Commentar philologisch-exegetisch-kritisch-historischen Inhalts über Cicero's Buch vom allgemeinen und besondern menschlich Anständigen und Pflichtmässigen. § On page *3 recto a small oval stamp: Ex bibliotheca J. Dorneri) (Collation: *-2*12; A-2C12 (minus the blank leaves 2C11 & 2C12)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120509 Euro 225,00
GELLIUS. Auli Gellii Noctes Atticae, cum notis et emendationibus Joannis Frederici Gronovii. Leiden (Lugd. Batavorum), Apud Ioannem de Vivié, 1687. 8vo. (LXVIII, including the frontispiece),499,(109);142,(8 index),(2 blank) p. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 83246810X; Schweiger 2,379; Dibdin 1,340/41: 'carefully published by J.F. Gronovius'; Fabricius/Ernesti 3,10; Brunet 2,2 1524; Neue Pauly Suppl. 2, p. 261; Graesse 3,46; Ebert 8289) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints. Short title in ink on the back. Engraved frontispiece by A. de Blois, depicting the Roman author at work at his desk; in front of his desk a relief of 'Minerv. Faut.' i.e 'Minerva Fautrix'; he is supported by the Muses, and Apollo, who plays his lyre. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, a sunlit landscape; above the sun runs a banner with the motto 'ab Uno Vita'. Some woodcut initials) (Condition: Vellum somewhat soiled. Upper corner of lower board very slightly damaged. Old ownership entries on the front flyleaves. Some slight foxing) (Note: The 'Noctes Atticae' of the Roman author Aulus Gellius, ca. A.D. 130 - ca. 180, contain many delightful scenes which he collected during his student days at Athens. The 'Attic Nights' is in fact a 'collection of mainly short chapters, dealing with a great variety of topics: philosophy, history, law, grammar, literary criticism, textual questions and many others'. (...) 'the great usefulness of the Noctes Atticae is derived from the preservation of countless fragments of earlier writers'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 460) The editions of classical writers of Latin prose produced by the Dutch scholar of German origin Johann Friedrich Gronov, 1611-1671, mark a epoch in the study of Livy, the Senecas, Tacitus and Gellius. (Sandys 2,319/21) He published his first Gellius edition in 1651, which is praised by Ernesti/Fabricius as 'emendatissimam'. Johann Friedrich was appointed 'professor eloquentiae' at the Athenaeum Illustre of Deventer in 1642. Here he started a period of continuous and fruitful scholarly activity. In 1658 he came to Leiden to succeed Daniel Heinsius as professor of Greek and History. In 1687 the son of Johann Friedrich, Jacobus (Jakob) Gronovius, 1645-1716, who was professor of classics at Leiden from 1679 till his death, produced a new edition of his father's Gellius. He added to it the commentary written by his father at an earlier date. This commentary only covers the books I-IX) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in ink: 'Lucas Nilant. Omnia cum pereant est virtus sola perennis. Haec immortales reddere sola protest', an epigram of the Welsh epigrammist John Owen. On the front flyleaf in ink: 'Conradus Nilant H.F.C.N. Numquam stygias fertur ad umbras inclyta virtus. i.u.s. 1700', a citation from Seneca's Hercules Oetaeus, vs. 1983 f.; The Nilant family belonged to the gentry of the Dutch province of Overijssel. A daughter of Johann Friedrich Gronovius, Maria Elisabeth, even married a Nilant. Both Nilants who possessed this book, may have known Jacobus Gronovius, or his father personally. Jacobus, educated in Deventer at the Athenaeum by his father, later returned there, from 1674 till his call to Leyden in 1679. (NNBW 1,985/86)) (Collation: a-8, b-8 (minus blank leaves b7 & b8), 2*-3*8; 4*4; A-2P8 (leaf 2P8 blank); A-I8, K4 (leaf K4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130403 Euro 200,00
GELLIUS. Auli Gellii Noctium Atticarum libri XX prout supersunt, quos ad libros MSStos novo & multo labore exegerunt, perpetuis notis & emendationibus illustraverunt Johannes Fredericus et Jacobus Gronovii. Accedunt Gasp. Scioppii integra MSStorum duorum codicum collatio, Petri Lambecii lucubrationes Gellianae, & ex Lud. Carrionis castigationibus utilia excerpta, ut & selecta variaque commentaria ab Ant. Thysio & Jac. Oiselio congesta. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Cornelium Boutesteyn & Johannem du Vivié, 1706. 4to. (XXXVI),903,(63 indices) p. Vellum 25.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,379: 'Noch immer sehr gesuchte Ausgabe und durch die neueste Bearbeitung nicht entbehrlich gemacht'. ; Dibdin 1,341: 'This edition (...) has as much literary merit as any of the Dutch editions of the classics in 4to. The notes of other critics are selected with judgment, and the explanatory remarks of Gronovius must give every scholar the most exalted idea of his singular erudition'. Moss 2,204/5; Ernesti Fabr. Bibliotheca Latina 3,10: 'Haec editio repetita est'. Ernesti calls this edition 'luculenta'.; Brunet 2,2 1524: 'Édition la meilleure qui ait paru jusqu'ici'; Neue Pauly Suppl. 2, p. 261; Spoelder p. 527, Delft 1) (Details: Prize copy of the Schola Latina of the city of Delft, without the prize. Back with 5 raised bands; short title in second compartment; gilt double fillet borders on both covers, gilt fleur-de-lis in all 4 corners; gilt Y in the center of both covers. Engraved frontispiece by Goeree/Sluyter, depicting the Roman author in his study at work at his desk; he has just started writing the first sentence of the last chapter of his book (liber XX, caput 11) on the role of papyrus in front of him. We read: 'P. Lavinii liber est non'. In front of Gellius are burning oil lamps; through the window one sees a moonlit Athens. Title in red and black; engraved scene of a walled city, presumably Athens, on the title) (Condition: vellum age-toned, somewhat soiled and scratched; small stain on the frontcover; front flyleaf and the prize gone; front joint partly split; small stamp on the title; some foxing) (Note: The 'Noctes Atticae' of the Roman author Aulus Gellius, ca. A.D. 130 - ca. 180, contain many delightful scenes which he collected during his student days at Athens. The 'Attic Nights' is in fact a 'collection of mainly short chapters, dealing with a great variety of topics: philosophy, history, law, grammar, literary criticism, textual questions and many others'. (...) 'the great usefulness of the Noctes Atticae is derived from the preservation of countless fragments of earlier writers'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 460) The editions of classical writers of Latin prose produced by the Dutch scholar of German origin Johann Friedrich Gronov, 1611-1671, mark a epoch in the study of Livy, the Senecas, Tacitus and Gellius. (Sandys 2,319/21) He published his first Gellius edition in 1651, which is praised by Ernesti/Fabricius as 'emendatissimam'. Johann Friedrich was appointed 'professor eloquentiae' at the Athenaeum Illustre of Deventer in 1642. Here he started a period of continuous and fruitful scholarly activity. In 1658 he came to Leiden to succeed Daniel Heinsius as professor of Greek and History. In 1687 the son of Johann Friedrich, Jacobus (Jakob) Gronovius, 1645-1716, who was professor of classics at Leiden from 1679 till his death, produced a new edition of his father's Gellius. He added to it the commentary written by his father at an earlier date. This commentary only covers the books I-IX. In 1706 Jacobus Gronovius published another revised and augmented edition. It contains a great number of observations of Antony Thys, or Antonius Thysius, ca. 1603-1665, professor of Poiesis of the University at Leyden, and Jacobus Oiselius, 1631-1686, and Johannes Fredricus Gronovius, the father of Jacobus. It offers also the collations of 2 manuscripts by the German scholar Kasper Schoppe, or Gasparus Scioppius, 1599-1649. Jacobus Gronovius received those collations, he tells in the 'Dedicatio' from the Italian publisher/librarian Antonio Magliabechi, 1633-1714, who possessed a Gellius edition once owned and annotated by Schioppius. ('Scias' writes Magliabechi to Gronovius, 'igitur servari in mea Bibliotheca (...) Gellium ipsa Scioppii manu adnotatum, & variantibus lectionibus non uno in loco illustratum'. (p. *4 recto) This edition also offers some excerpta from the corrections of the Belgian latinist Louis Carrion, or Ludovicus Carrio, 1547-1595, who had published a Gellius edition in 1585 in Paris) (Provenance: The stamp reads: 'P.C. Molhuijsen'. Philipp Christiaan Molhuijsen, 1870-1944, is best known as chief librarian of the Royal Library at The Hague, as editor of the Correspondence of Grotius, and editor of the NNBW, the 'Nieuw Nederlandsch Biographisch Woordenboek'. He studied classics in Leyden, and published in 1896 a dissertation, 'De tribus Homeri Odysseae codicibus antiquissimis'. In 1897 he started his bibliographic career as librarian of the Library of the University at Leyden. From 1911 on he was the leading force of the Dutch Biographic Dictionary, the 'Nieuw Nederlandsch Biographisch Woordenboek', better known as NNBW. In 1921 he was appointed chief librarian of the 'Koninklijke Bibliotheek' at The Hague. He also produced the first 2 volumes of the correspondence of Hugo Grotius, 1928-1937) (Collation: *4 (including frontispiece and title), 2*2, 3* - 5*4; A - 6F4 (leaf 6F4 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 150550 Euro 400,00
GOTHOFREDUS, D. Antiquae Historiae ex XXVII. authoribus contextae libri VI, Totidem solennes temporum epochas continentes. Dionysii Gothofredi JC. opera. Cum indice accuratiss. (Bound with the second part, which is called:) Historiae Antiquae pars altera De imperatoribus Romanis. Strasbourg, (Argentorati), Impensis Lazari Zetzneri, 1604. 8vo. 2 parts in 1 volume. (XVI),385,(36); 639,(23) p. Modern half vellum 16 cm (Ref: VD17 3:006921C & VD17 3:006920V) (Details: boards marbled; woodcut printer's mark on both titles, depicting the head of the goddess Athena in profile, the motto is 'Scientia immutabilis' ; occasional woodcut initials) (Condition: vellum at the head of the spine stained; paper yellowing) (Note: The French scholar Dionysius Gothofredus, or Denis Godefroy, 1549-1622, is best known as the editor of the monumental 'Corpus iuris civilis', Lyon 1583, an edition with commentary of the complete collection of fundamental works in Roman jurisprudence (Digest, Institutions, Codex, Novellae) issued on order of the emperor Justinian at the beginning of the sixth century. Gothofredus' edition made history. He did not only coin the title 'Corpus Juris Civilis', but it was issued more than 50 times, with or without commentary and glossae. Gothofredus studied law at Louvain, Cologne, and Heidelberg, and then returned to Paris, his hometown, to work as a solicitor. But being protestant he had however to leave France in 1579, escaping civil war and persecution, and fled to Geneva. There he was professor of Roman law for the next ten years. In 1589 he was called back by king Henry IV, but the next year he had to flee the country again. His house and library were plundered. In 1590 he took refuge in Basle. In 1591 he accepted a professorship of Roman law in Strassburg. From there he moved in 1604 to the university of Heidelberg, where he became head of the faculty of law. Gothofredus also worked on classical authors such as Cicero and Seneca and the ancient grammarians, and on ancient history. Gothofredus wrote the dedication and the preface of the first edition of the 'Antiquae Historiae ex XXVII authoribus contextae' during his stay in Basel in 1590, short after his escape from France. This book on offer is the second edition, and was published in 1604 in Strassburg. In the preface Gothofredus explains that he offers here the 'studiosi' this collection of texts of Roman historians, to help them to acquire knowledge of the history of Rome from the sources, and not from a pont ten times removed from its source. ('Hoc enim opere, primum antiquos authores selegi, ut studiosi ex antiquis, non ex decima lacuna cognitionem historiarum haurirent'. (page *5 recto) He presents also a list of 27 historians from whose work he drew, from Berosus and Manetho to Paulus Diaconus and the Suda. He organizes their works chronologically in six books, 1: on Italy before Rome, 2: Rome and her kings, 3: the consuls, 4: Roman emperors, from Julius Caesar till ca. 800, 5: Constantinople till 1453, 6: and on the medieval emperors of France and Germany. Book 4, on the Roman emperors is by far the longest, 480 pages. For instance, when he deals with Julius Caesar Gothofredus prints texts of Livy, Florus, Eutropius, Aurelius Victor. The last 2 books (after 800) are short and rather sketchy. Gothofredus doesnot use Tacitus, Sallustius, Suetonius, Historia Augusta , or Ammianus Marcellinus. The 1590 edition is rather common, this edition of 1604 however seems rather rare. In KvK we found only a few copies)(Collation: Part 1: )(8, A - 2C8, 2D4 (leaf 2D4 and the verso of leaf 2D3 blank) Part 2: 2E - 3Y8, 3Z4 (minus the blank leaf 3Z4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151895 Euro 280,00
GRONOVIUS,J.F. Joh. Frederici Gronovii De Sestertiis, seu subsecivorum pecuniae veteris Graecae & Romanae libri IV. Accesserunt L. Volusius Maecianus JC. & Balbus Mensor De Asse. Pascasii Grosippi Tabulae Nummariae. Mantissa, & tres ANTEXÊGÊSEIS de foenore Unciario & Centesimis usuris. Item de Hyperpyro. Salmasii Epistola, & ad eam responsio. LOGARIKÊ PALAIA KAI NEA, graece & latine. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex Officina Joannis du Vivié, 1691. 4to. (XXXII),766,(26) p., frontispiece. Vellum 23.5 cm (Ref: Brunet 6, no. 29063; Goldsmiths'-Kress, library of economic literature 02895,1) (Details: 6 thongs laced through joints; short title in ink on the back. Frontispiece designed and executed (fecit) by the Dutch illustrator Anthony van Zylvelt (died ca. 1695). Depicted is a gathering of classical scholars behind a long table. Left at the head of the table is seated Gronovius himself, proudly fingering some coins. At the right sits Joseph Justus Scaliger, in front sits Justus Lipsius. Behind the tables are standing 22 other 'lesser' scholars. On the table is written: 'centesimae usurae', in Roman law, the highest rate of interest, amounting to 12 percent a year; and 'foenus unciarium', in the law of the XII tables this was a rate of interest of 1/12, the highest legal interest in the early republic. Both terms refer to a book on interest in antiquity which Gronovius had published in 1661. In the background on the wall a frame with the text: 'Ioannis Frederici Gronovii, Pecunia Vetus'. Woodcut printer's device on the title, motto: 'Ab Uno vita') (Condition: Vellum soiled; faint stain on frontcover) (Note: The Dutch classicist of German origin Johann Friedrich Gronov, or Gronovius, 1611-1671, was the successor of Daniel Heinsius at the University of Leiden. He was influenced by Vossius, Grotius, Heinsius and Scriverius. His editions mark an epoch in the study of Livy, of Seneca, Tacitus & Gellius. His interest in textual criticism of Latin poetry was due to the discovery of the Florentine MS of the tragedies of Seneca. In his riper years 'the acumen exhibited in his handling of prose is also exemplified in his treatment of the text of poets such as Phaedrus and Martial, Seneca and Statius'. (Sandys, History of Classical Scholarship, 2,321) Gronovius had more interests than editing, commenting and textual criticism. During his academic career he published also important works on numismatics and on money in the ancient world. In 1643 he published 'Commentarius de sestertiis', in 1656 the first edition of 'De Sestertiis, seu subsecivorum pecuniae veteris Graecae & Romanae libri IV', and in 1661 'De centesimis usuris et foenere unciario'. In the preface of this book on offer, the son of J.F. Gronovius, Jacob, who himself was also professor of Greek at Leiden (1645-1716), tells his readers that he collected and edited these works of his father at the request of the publisher for a second edition. This included also the short treatises on numerical divisions, weights & measures of the late and obscure antique authors Maecianus and Balbus Mensor, which his father had edited previously. Jacob Gronovius added some small unpublished works of his father, inter alia on the 'Hyperpyron' (superrefined), a devaluated gold coin, which was introduced in 1092 by the Byzantine emperor Alexius Comnenus (1056-1118). Jacob included also a letter of the French scholar Salmasius to his father, and an edition made by his father of a work of the same Byzantine emperor, Alexius Comnenus, the 'Vetus et novum rationarium', which he couldnot publish, due to illness. This Byzantine treatise contains an inventory of the revenues of the State, and was later published by the French scholar Montfaucon in Paris in 1688. We add also a 4-page manuscript which we found loosely inserted into this book. It is entitled 'De pecunia veteri Romanorum', and seems to consist of college notes. The hand is 18th century, and is of a Dutchman, for he mentions somewhere 'stuferus', which is a Dutch coin, een 'stuiver', value 5 cents. In the margins of the manuscript are written in ink occasional scholarly remarks, also made by a Dutchman, but in the 20th century) (Collation: *-4*4; A-5G4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140129 Euro 500,00
HANNOT,S. & D. VAN HOOGSTRAATEN. Nieuw woordboek der Nederlantsche en Latynsche tale. Waar in de woorden en spreekwyzen der eerste tale, naar hunne verscheide beteekenissen en kracht, door de laatste naeukeurig verklaart en opgeheldert worden. Alles getrokken uit het gebruik, en de beste schryveren door S. HANNOT. Vervolgens overzien, van veele misstellingen en andere vlekken gezuivert, ook met veele woorden en spreekwyzen merkelyk vermeerdert en verrykt door D. VAN HOOGSTRATEN. 3e dr. Dordrecht etc., J. van Braam etc., 1736. 4to. (XVI),1016 p. Half vellum (Cover shabby; vellum on back wrinkled & sl. deformed; front hinge cracking, but still strong; st. on title; lower corner first gathering mottled; some of those lower corners are repaired, some of them are partly gone) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 059875 Euro 80,00
HARPOCRATION. HARPOKRATIÔNOS LEXIKON TÔN DEKA RÊTORÔN. Harpocrationis lexicon decem oratorum. Nicolaus Blancardus, Belga, Leidensis, emendavit, disposuit, latine vertit, ac elenchum veterum scriptorum adjecit. Subjiciuntur Philippi Jacobi Maussaci notae, & dissertatio critica, in qua de auctore, & de hoc scribendi genere disputatur; omnia ex Tolosana appendice correcta & suppleta. Accesserunt Henrici Valesii notae & animadversiones in Harpocrationem, & Maussaci notas. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), J. a Gelder incepit, J.A. de la Font perfecit, 1683. 4to. 2 parts in 1: (XXIV),432,141,(11) p. Vellum 24 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,195; Brunet 3,1 p. 47; in STCN 14 Dutch copies) (Details: 6 thongs laced through cover; woodcutn printer's mark on title: a turtle, with motto 'paulatim'. 2 columns, with Greek text and facing translation into Latin; at the foot of the page are the notes; at the end a dissertation about Harpocration and the commentary of Henry de Valois) (Condition: Vellum soiled; 2 very small holes in the back) (Note: Valerius Harpocration, Greek rhetor and lexicographer from Alexandria, 2nd cent. A.D. The lexicon contains the glosses of the Ten Orators of the Hellenistic canon, and is one of the first lexicographic works with lemmata in alphabetical order. The copious annotations to the glosses contain numerous citations from other Attic authors and orators, like Aristotle and Xenophon. Harpocration was edited in 1614 by Ph.J. de Maussac. In 1683 the commentary of the French classical scholar Henri de Valois, 1603-1676, was added. De Valois was a contemporary of Mabillon and Du Cange; The editor of this edition of 1683 is the Dutch classical scholar Nicolaas Blanckaert, 1624-1703, since 1669 professor of Greek at the university of Franeker. He edited a number of Greek authors among who Arrianus and Thomas Magister) (Provenance: On the verso of the dedicatio in faint and curly handwriting 'Sum Antonii Holt') (Collation: *-3*4, a-3h4, A-T4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140077 Euro 300,00
HEINSIUS,D. Danielis Heinsii De contemptu mortis libri IV. Ad nobilissimum amplissisimumque virum Ianum Rutgersium. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex Officina Elzeviriana, 1621. 4to. (VIII),196,(24 index) p. 19th century hardback. 18.5 cm § One of the finest didactic poems of its time. (Ref: Willems 186; Berghman 861; Rahir 157; Brunet 3,83: 'la meilleure production poétique de l'auteur'; Ebert 9379) (Details: Dull binding. Title in red & black; Elsevier's printer's mark on the title, depicting an old man standing in the shade of a vine-entwined elmtree, symbolising the symbiotic relationship between scholar and publisher. The motto: 'Non solus', probably indicates the interdependency of publisher and scholar. On the verso of the last leaf of the second volume: 'Lugduni Batavorum, 'Typis Isaaci Elzevirii, Iurati Academiae Typographi, 1621'. Edges dyed red) (Condition: Binding slightly worn; 2 old brownish paper labels on the back; 1 library stamp and 1 small withdrawal 'Doublette' stamp on the title. Paper yellowing) (Note: The Dutch classical scholar of Flemish origin Daniel Heinsius, 1580-1655, who enjoyed international fame as an editor of classical texts, theorist of literary criticism, historian and neolatin poet, was professor of Poetics at the University of Leiden since 1603, extraordinarius Greek since 1605. After the death of J. Scaliger, to whose inner circle he belonged, he held the chair of Greek, from 1609 till 1647. He is best known for his edition of Aristotle's treatise on poetry (1611), which he studied in connexion with the 'Ars Poetica' of Horace. This edition is 'the only considerable contribution to the criticism and eludication of the work that was ever produced in the Netherlands. (...) In his pamphlet 'De tragoediae Constitutione', published in the same year (1611), he deals with all the essential points in Aristotle's treatise, giving proof that he has thoroughly imbided the author's spirit. (...) It was through this work that he became a centre of Aristotelian influence in Holland.' (J.E. Sandys, 'A history of classical scholship, N.Y., 1964, vol. 2, p. 314) Heinsius was an important representative of the great age of Neo-Latin in the Low Countries. The outline of 'De contemptu mortis', a didactic poem in 4 books, is simple: we should not be afraid of death for two reasons, the soul is immortal, and life on earth is full of misery. Platonic, Neoplatonic, Stoic and Christian arguments are set forth which explain why man should not fear death. The form of 'De contemptu' is that of Vergil's Georgica, 4 books of ca. 600 verses. Heinsius confesses his debt to Vergil in the opening lines of his poem, which form a variation of the first verses of the Georgica. The structure of the poem, its style and language are also Vergilian, including the similes. A lucretian element is Heinsius' objective to free humanity, like Lucretius did, from fear of death, but the tenor of the poem is however antilucretian. Heinsius states that the soul doesnot desintegrate after death, but that it continues its existence. Heinsius warns explicitly against epicurism, which is, he thinks, an easy, but misleading philosophy. In book 2 Heinsius answers Lucretius with his own epic catalogue of inspiring famous men. For Lucretius Epicurus was the culmination point, for Heinsius it is the French genius Josephus Justus Scaliger, his much admired master. An important source of inspiration for Heinsius was also the didactic poem 'De animorum immortalitate' of the Italian Aonio Paleario, published in 1535, which is also antilucretian. (Source for 'De contemptu': 'Daniel Heinsius, De verachting van de dood, De contemptu mortis', Vertaling door J. Bloemendaal en W. Steenbeek, Amst., Bert Bakker, 2005, p. 18/23) In the same year 1621 Elsevier published this didactic poem as part of Heinsius' 'Poematum editio nova', but this time in a smaller octavo format. He sold the octavo edition also separately. (Provenance: Round armorial stamp of 'Biblioth. Publ. Reg. Stuttgart'. Small, faint oval stamp on the front pastedown: 'Gerschel's Antiquariat, Stuttgart')(Collation: *4, A-2D4, 2E2 )(Photographs on request)
Book number: 130412 Euro 775,00
HERALDUS, DESIDERIUS. (DIDIER HÉRAULD) Desiderii Heraldi Adversariorum libri duo. Quibus adiunctus est animadversionum eiusdem in librum Iamblichi de vita Pythagorae nuper primùm editum liber unus. Paris (Parisiis), Apud Ieremiam Perier, via Iacobea, sub signo Bellophorontis, 1599. 8vo. 2 parts in 1: (XVI),183 (recte 181),(1 blank);(9 index),(1 blank) p. Calf 16.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,390) (Details: Boards ruled with double fillet borders. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, it depicts Bellerophon riding Pegasus and fighting against the Chimaira) (Condition: Binding worn & scuffed. Joints splitting, and abraded on the ties. Corners bumped. Both pastedowns, recycled and problably originating from an incunable leaf, loose. Paper yellowing. Some foxing) (Note: The genre of Variae Lectiones, to which this collection of Adversaria belongs, was very popular in the 16th century. It was a kind of short track philology, reflecting the universalism and ecleticism of that century. Ce genre d'ouvrages s'apparente à une compilation de notes de lecture, de citations, d'anecdotes, d'explications de texte, de considérations philologiques, historiques, géographiques, anthropologiques, culturelles, religieuses, juridiques, scientifiques, etc. (M. Roux, Les Variae Lectiones de Marc-Antoine Muret: l'esprit d'une homme, l'esprit d'un siècle, Lyon 2011, p. 10) The Renaissance was an era that read, that thought while reading, that wrote while reading, and lived while reading. Books were at the center of each intellectual activity. One jotted down in the margins, wrote between the lines. Au XVIe siècle, le lettré est donc d'abord un lecteur qui, presque par accident, parce qu'il commence, sous l'impulsion de la lecture même, des idées qu'elle génère, des réminiscences qu'elle convoque, des textes satelites qu'elle sollicte, sur lesquels elle rebondit à écrire sous formes de notes, devient auteur (Idem, p. 9) We see this humanistic practise of read, write and publish at work in this collection of remarks published by the young French pholologist Didier Hérauld, or latinized Desiderius Heraldus, who was born in 1579. He was appointed professor of Greek at the Académie de Sedan at a very young age. When he was only 20 he published this book filled with his learned Adversaria, critical observations on a great number of ancient authors. . Heraldus professorship didnot last long, for he fell victim to religious intolerance. He was a protestant, and when he spoke in favour of the moderate Arminius, the orthodox Tilenus, who was more influential than the newcomer, forced him to give up his chair. He went to Paris, and established himself as a lawyer. In 1623 he formulated the marriage contract for his friend the famous classicist Claude De Saumaise. In Paris he held the office of counselor of the parliament. Heraldus chiefly distinguished himself by the cultivation of classical literature. He produced a commentary on Martial (Paris 1600), an edition with commentary of Arnobii disputatio adversus gentes (Paris 1605), an edition with commentary of Minucius Felix (Paris 1613), an edition with commentary of Tertullian's Apologeticus (Paris 1613), and several other works on law. (Biographie Universelle Ancienne et Moderne, Tome 67, Suppl., Paris 1840, p. 78/79) On the authority of the editors of the Scaligerana, it may be assumed that Hérauld thought his first-fruits, this Adversariorum libri duo to be not ripe enough. We quote the opinion of the greatest classical scholar of his century J. Scaliger, 1540-1609: Heraldus se repent d'avoir fait ses Adversaria. Son Arnobe est bon, il promet un Tertullien. (Scaligerana, ou Bons Mots, rencontres agréables et remarques judicieuses & savantes de J. Scaliger, Cologne 1695, p. 189) This opinion of Scaliger may have been caused by his dislike of the genre Adversaria or Variae Lectiones, books in which a large number of passages in a hoste of ancient authors were explained, or boldly emended. (J.E.Sandys, A history of classical scholarship, Cambr. 1958, Vol. II, p. 186) The collection adversaria of Heraldus is divided into 2 books. We find critical remarks on Diogenes Laërtius, Arnobius, Apuleius, Plutarchus, Theocritus, Herodotus, Pausanias and many alii. At the end of the book we find probably the most interesting part of the book, Heraldus' remarks on the edition of the De Vita Pythagorica of the late antique neoplatonist Iamblichus, the editio princeps of which had been published a year earlier by Johannes Arcerius Theodoretus (son of Theodor). This Arcerius was professor of Greek of the university at Franeker only since 1589. His edition and its translation are generally considered to be rubbish. (See for Arcerius and his edition Hoffmann 2,387/88, and NNBW 4,58/59) The 20 years old Heraldus must have been one of the first scholars to pronounce such a verdict, that Arcerius produced a lousy edition. In the short preface to his remarks (p. 137/38) Heraldus tells that when his 2 books of Adversaria were already on the press, he received the editio princeps of the Life of Pythagoras, and that he began immediately to read it eagerly. He read much that was wise and elegant, but alas, the editor was incapable of dealing with this difficult text. Arcerius' lack of caution (parum cauto) resulted in great errors (ingentes frustrationes). Heraldus therefore decided to publish the corrections and explanations which he had jotted down in the margins of this editio princeps, and to add them as a kind of supplement to his Adversaria. Heraldus doesnot want to complain too long, he says venting his gal, that such an important text was treated so incompetently and irresponsably, and with such 'aeikesi plêgais'. It would have been better if this text misere accepto had remained in darkness) (Provenance: From the library of Andrew Fletcher of Saltoun, 1653-1716, a Scottish author and politician. He was leading the opposition against the 1707 Act of Union between Scotland and England. He also was a passionate book collector. The manuscript entry of Fletcher is on the inside of the lower board) (Collation: â8, A-M8 (leaf M3 verso and M8 verso blank; the numbering of the pages 161/162 between the gathering K and L has been skipped; the catchword is ok, and apart from this skipping nothing is irregular)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120533 Euro 475,00
HERODOTUS. Herodoti Halicarnassei Historiae libri IX: et de vita Homeri libellus. Illi ex interpretatione Laurentio Vallae adscripta, hic ex interpretatione Conradi Heresbachii; utraque ab Henr. Stephano recognita. Ex Ctesia excerptae historiae. Apologia Henr. Stephani pro Herodoto. Accedit in hac editione Spicilegium Frid. Sylburgii, ad Henr. Stephanum virum clariss. Frankfurt (Francofurti), Apud haeredes Andreae Wecheli, 1584. 8vo. LXXII,592,(88) p. Pigskin 18.5 cm (Ref: VD16 H 2515. Weitere Nummern: VD16 C 6157, VD16 E 4005, VD16 H 2533; Hoffmann 2,236; Graesse 3,256; Ebert 9560, but see also 9542) (Details: Latin translation only. The binding of this book is important in the context of the cultural history of Lutheranism. The binding dates from the last 2 decades of the 16th century. The back has 4 raised bands. The boards are decorated with blind stamped triple fillet borders and a row consisting of floral motives and some tiny portraits. The central panel of the upper board shows a fine example of a well preserved portrait of Johann Friedrich I, the Magnanimous (der Grossmüthige), Elector of Saxony (Kurfürst und Herzog von Sachsen), 1503-1554, in full armour, with 3 lines of text at the bottom: 'Victus eras acie, fidei con / stantia tandem victorem / ante homines fecit et ante deum'; on the lower board the blindstamped impressive and also well preserved coat of arms of this Elector of Saxony, who became after his death a kind of protestant Saint. He still is, for the 3rd of March, the day he died, is still commemorated in the evangelical church of Germany. Because the portrait of this nobleman also figures on a book held in the Penn Libraries, where it is described as 'Elector of Saxony, possibly August I, 1526-1586' (Cicero, Philosophical works, 1565, copy in Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Call no.: LatC C4855.10 1565), we will investigate this in some detail. Johann Friedrich I was an ardent follower of Martin Luther, with whom he corresponded. He was a lifelong promotor of the reformatory movement, and one of the movement's most important political leaders. Johann Friedrich was defeated and taken prisoner on the 24th of april 1547 by troops of the emperor Charles V in the neighbourhood of Mühlberg (battle of Mühlberg), 'mannhaft fechtend, am Backen verwundet'. (On this wound on the cheek and the resulting scar, see below) On the 10th of May he was sentenced to death. 'Eben mit seinem Schicksalgefährten Herzog Ernst von Grubenhagen, beim Schachspiel sitzend, hörte J.Fr. wie erzählt wird (...) das Urtheil mit grossem Gleichmuth an; 'Pergamus' wandte er sich zu seinem erschrockenen Mitspieler'. This sentence was not carried out. Johann Friedrich had however to abdicate, but he refused to be converted to Catholicism. In captivity his political role came to an end, but in prison he became a protestant Saint. 'Mit diesem jähen Sturzen, war Johann Friedrichs politische Rolle zu Ende. Nicht aber seine politische Bedeutung für das evangelische Deutschland. Die heitere Ruhe mit dem er sein Unglück hinnahm, die Unerschütterlichkeit seiner religiösen Überzeugung (...) machten ihn zum leuchtende Vorbilde seiner Glaubensgenossen (...)'. Charles V tried to force him to accept catholicism, he humiliated him, but 'Alles, erklärte er (J.Fr.), habe er bisher hintangesetzt, um das Wort Gottes lauter und rein zu erhalten. Obwohl er bereits Alles verloren und ein armer Gefangener geworden, solle ihn doch Gott davor behüten, dass er nun zu letzt noch davon abweichen, die erkannte Wahrheit verleugnen, und das Papstthum annehmen solle'. The duke was released in 1552, and his way home was a real triumph. 'Die Heimkehr des fürstlichen Martyrers über Nürnberg und Bamberg glich einem Triumphzuge; wohin er kam, strömte das Volk ihm entgegen. (...) Zu Jena empfingen ihn Professoren und Studenten der neubegründeten Universität'. (...) Melanchthon wrote after his death: 'Die Bekenntniss und Beständigkeit Herzog Johann Friedrichs, hat unsere Kirche mehr gefrommt, als vielleicht die Victoria hat dienen mögen'. (German quotations: ADB 14 p.326/330) In 1551 Matthes Gebel made a medal with the portrait of a bearded duke, with a clearly visible scar on his left cheek. There is also an engraved portrait with a scar made in 1547, the year of the battle of Mühlberg. This scar on the left cheek, which is apparantly part of the iconography of the Duke, is also clearly visible on the blindstamped portrait on the front of this book. So our conclusion must be that this portrait belongs to Johann Friedrich I. The coat of arms on the backcover was made after an engraving of Lucas Cranach, a friend of Johann Friedrich. In Jena there is a statue of Johann Friedrich, the socalled 'Hanfried-Denkmal' to commemorate the founding of the University in 1558, of which Johann Friedrich had been the driving force. The 'Deutsches Historisches Museum' holds a number of paintings (1630), which depict the life of this protestant Saint in 28 scenes. § Wechel's woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting the winged horse Pegasus gracefully arched over a caduceus and 2 intertwined cornucopiae) (Condition: Cover soiled and worn at the extremities. Some damage to the head and tail of the back, and to the upper board. Corners heavily bumped. 2 old ownership inscriptions on the title. Small inscription with references to Cicero on the front pastedown. Small inscription on the verso of the title. Occasional old red ink underlinings. Occasional marginalia in the Apologia, probably made by Christoph Richter (see below) (Note: This book is a reissue of a revised Latin translation of Herodotus' 'Historiae', made by Lorenzo Valla, and published by the French humanist/scholar Henri Estienne, or in Latin Henricus Stephanus, in Geneva in 1566. Stephanus plays an important role in the history of the reception of Herodotus. In 1474 the Latin translation of Valla was first published. 1502 saw the 'editio princeps' of the Greek text. In the same time the work of the detractors and critics of this Greek historian came on the market, especially Plutarch's 'De Herodoti malignitate' (1509), but also works of Aristotle (Herodotus is ignorant), Flavius Josephus (he is a liar), Strabo (he likes to tell simple stories), Lucianus (does not tell the truth), Gellius (he invents stories). The supporters of Herodotus were in the minority. We only mention Cicero, who called him 'Pater historiae'. When Henri Estienne was planning to publish a new revised Latin translation of Herodotus, he decided to try his talents as a critic on Herodotus, and wrote in his defence his 'Apologia pro Herodoto', to accompany this revised translation, which was published by him in Geneva in 1566. This treatise is full of philological niceties and Latin and Greek quotations, to be read by a humanist forum. (See 'Henrici Stephani Apologia pro Herodoto. Henri Estienne, Apologie für Herodot, nach der Erstausgabe (Genf 1566) herausgegeben und übersetzt von Johannes Kramer', Meisenheim am Glan, Hain, 1980, p. VII. A copy of this book is sold together with this 1584 edition) § In the introductory letter of the German classical scholar Fredericus Sylburg we are told, that this 1584 reissue was published, no, not for the money, but because there arose a demand for a Latin translation of Herodotus from Eastern Europe ('e Pannonia superiore, Boiemia, & aliis quibusdam locis', leaf a2 recto). It was brought on the market, not to compete with the folio edition of 1566, but for people who could not afford such an expensive book, and prefered a smaller and cheaper edition ('nostra vero tenuioris fortunae hominibus', leaf a2 recto). Sylburg added, he says, occasional marginal notes to the text of his own and other scholars) (Provenance: The provenance theme of this book is Saxonian and Lutheran. 1: An old and long inscription written on the front flyleaf: 'Tout avec Dieu. Pour temoigner ma tres bonne amitie et affection, que je porte a Monsr. Jean Trölschen, je luy ay donne ceste livre priant de le prandre a bon gre, et deme(u)rant jusque au tombeau, Son bien humble et bien affectione serviteur M. Jean Ernst Gerard Jenensis'. There are two Lutheran theologians bearing the name 'Johannes Ernst Gerhard', father (1621-1668) and son (1662-1707). Both were born and educated in Jena. The Father was appointed professor 'Historiarum' in Jena in 1652, his son taught theology in Jena, and became professor in Giessen in 1700. (ADB 8,772) Who the receiver 'Jean', or 'Johannes' or 'Hans Trölschen' was, we could not find out. § 2: On the title in old ink 'Ex libris M. Johann Rolle .... Vicar'. § 3: Below the imprint an old ink inscription: 'Sum ex libris Christoph. Richteri Altenburg', continued with a verse from the New Testament in Greek: 'Hêmôn gar to politeuma en ouranois huparchei', 'For our converstation is in heaven' (Ep. ad Ephesios 3,20). Christoph Richter, 'Altenburger Baumeister', was the architect of the 'Gottsackerkirche zur Auferstehung Christi' in Altenburg. This Lutheran church was built in late renaissance style between 1639-1650. (See the 'Liste der Kirchen im Altenburger Land' in Wikipedia) § 4: Old ink inscription on the blank lower margin of the verso of the title: 'Hunc librum dono accepi a Dn. N. (Joh. erased) Christ. Ungewittero, ut monumentum aeternae suae benevolentiae, J.W. Riedesel'. This might be the Hessian protestant theologian Christoph Ungewitter, 1681-1756, who was 'Hofprediger' of the 'Landgraf' of Kassel. (ADB 39/303) The receiver of this book may be the jurist and diplomat 'Johann Wilhelm Freiherr von Riedesel zu Eisenbach', 1705-1782, of Hessian nobility. (NDB 21,570-72) He was 'Reichskammergerichtsassessor' in Wetzlar. (Much on him is to be found in: 'Reichspersonal, Funktionsträger für Kaiser und Reich', edited by A. Baumann, Köln, 2003). § 5: On the front flyleaf in pencil '27 december 1960', written by the Flemish linguist Walter Couvreur, 1914-1996, professor of Indoeuropean linguistics at the University of Gent. The place of acquisition he wrote on the flyleaf at the end: 'Frankfurt, Mineur') (Collation: alpha-delta8, eta4; a-z8, A-T8, V4 (leaf V3 missigned V2)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130080 Euro 2600,00
HERODOTUS. Les Histoires d'Hérodote, mises en François, par P. Du Ryer, de l'Académie Françoise, Conseiller, & Historiographe du Roy. Seconde édition reueuë, corrigée & augmentée d'annotations en marge. Paris (A Paris), Chez Augustin Courbe, dans la petite Salle, à la Palme, 1658. Folio. (XVI),636 (recte 628),22 (index) p. Mottled calf 41 cm (Ref: Brunet 3,126; Hoffmann 2,238 ; Ebert 9562; See especially Moss 1,465/66) (Details: Back gilt and with 6 raised bands; gilt shield in second compartment; boards with double gilt fillet borders; engraved frontispiece: nine merry Muses on mount Helicon, their domain, and Apollo, who listens to them, lyre at hand. (The nine books of the 'Historiae', carry the names of the 9 Muses) Title in red and black; big printer's mark on the title, depicting a palm tree within an oval, the motto is 'curvata resurgo', designed and engraved by 'Matheus'. Big engraved headpiece at the beginning of the dedication; woodcut headpieces and initials; excellent paper with wide margins) (Condition: Cover worn and chafed, boards crackled and scratched, tail of spine damaged, corners bumped; waterstain in the lower inner margin of the first 8 leaves; pinpoint and almost invisible wormhole in the lower blank margin of the last few leaves) (Note: The first great name in classical Greek prose is the name of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, also known as the 'Father of History'. 'It is with him that a genuinely critical handling and an attempt to make the subject truly philosophic by correlating causes and effects instead of merely setting down, more or less accurately, what had taken place, may be said the commence'. (Rose, Handbook of Greek literature, London, 1965, p. 299/302) The subject of his 'Histories', which was written before 425 BC, is the Persian wars and the events leading up to and connected with them. Already in antiquity his wide-ranging method of historical writing evoked sharp criticism. His work is full of excursus and wondrous tales, stories of which he admitted that he could not guarantee the reliability. Nevertheless, he 'offered a powerful framework for medieval and later christian thinkers who needed to understand and describe the confrontation between the Christian and Islamic worlds'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 434). The last Byzantine historian Laonicus Chalcondyles, 1423-1490, took the 'Histories' as a model for his treatment of the wars between Byzantium and the Turks. 'As European horizons expanded, the Herodotean model became more and more attractive and valuable, and the wonders that Herodotus described came to seem no more implausible than the marvels of modern India or Mexico' (The Classical Tradition). He had also supporters for his accuracy and reliability in great French scholars as Joseph Scaliger and Isaac Casaubon. Pierre de Ryer, ca. 1600-1658, 'was a dramatist of considerable reputation. (...) Since 1621 he had been a royal secretary. (...) His fortunes did not improve, and about 1640 he began to work for the booksellers, for whom he produced an enormous amount of translations. (...) His true works are his tragedies. He had himself no illusions about his translations, but they served their age. They include Herodotus (1645), Cicero (1652), Livy (1653), Polybius (1655), Ovid (1660), and Seneca (1667) (J. Hutton, 'The Greek anthology in France', Ithaca, N.Y, 1946, p. 460) His translations remained popular through the end of the 17th century and into the beginning of the 18th. This translation of Herodotus may be called a commercial success. It was first published in folio in 1645, and repeated in 1658 and 1660. 1660 saw also an octavo edition for a broader public, and 1665 an edition in 12mo for, we assume, the general reader. More editions followed. 'Son Hérodote néamoins a eu du cours, on en a fait plusieurs éditions depuis 80 ans'. (Moss, p. 465) Du Ryer probably didnot know Greek. Hutton supposes that the translation was made from Valla's Latin translation. He copied most of Valla's mistakes, and misunderstood him in some passages. (Moss p. 466) Nevertheless, this translation served its age. It is clear from the preface that Du Ryer didnot translate for scholars, or students. He expected his readers to appreciate Herodotus, not as an historian, but because it was pleasant reading. He calls him 'doux', and it is his opinion that the Historiae 'semble avoir esté fait afin de donner du plaisir'. To prove his point Du Ryer cites in the preface to his translation Quintilian: 'Historia est proxima poetis & quodam modo carmen solutum; & scribitur ad narrandum non ad probandum'. (Inst. Or. 10.1.31) 'Mais s'il est vray que l'Historien ait de la conformité avec le Poëte, que l'Histoire soit pour ainsi parler, une Poësie en Prose, & qu'on l'escrive seulement pour faire la narration des choses, & non pas pour les prouver, auroit-on voulu qu'Herodote nous eust apporté des preuves de ce qu'il avance dans son Histoire?' (Préface p. a2 verso) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf in ink the name of one 'J.J. Royer') (Collation: pi4 (minus leaf pi4), chi1, A - Z4, Aa Zz4, Aaa - Zzz4, Aaaa - Iiii4, Kkkk2, a - c4 (the last leaf c4 blank) (The leaves between the 9 books are left blank: leaves N1, Z1, 3H3, 4D1 are doublesided blanks, and leaves 2I1, 2S2,, 3A4 and 3V4 are left blank on the verso side. Some erratic pagination: numbers 271/272 used twice, the page numbers of 471/480 are erroneously skipped)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 151906 Euro 220,00
HERODOTUS. Herodoot van Halikarnassus, Negen boeken der Historien, gezegt de Musen. Vervattende onder ander, de Lydische, Grieksche, Persiaensche, Egiptische, en Medische Historien. (...) Beneffens een beschrijving van Homeers leven, door den zelven Herodoot. Uit het Grieks vertaelt door Dr. O.D. Amsterdam, By Hieronymus Sweerts, 1665. 4to. (XLIV),689,(23 index) p., frontispiece. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Geerebaert XLIII,2; OiN 197; Hoffmann 2,239/40) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints; engraved title: The historian at work, behind him the Muse Clio. She points at a scene outside the window; occasional woodcut initials) (Condition: Vellum soiled; a skillful repair of a splitting front joint at the foot of the spine; lower and right edges of frontispiece slightly cut short and thumbed) (Note: The first great name in classical Greek prose in the name of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, also known as the 'Father of History'. 'It is with him that a genuinely critical handling and an attempt to make the subject truly philosophic by correlating causes and effects instead of merely setting down, more of less accurately, what had taken place, may be said the commence'. (Rose, Handbook of Greek literature, London, 1965, p. 299/302) The subject of his 'Histories', which was written before 425 BC, is the Persian wars and the events leading up to and connected with them. Already in antiquity his wide-ranging method of historical writing evoked sharp criticism. His work is full of excursus and wondrous tales, stories of which he admitted that he could not guarantee the reliability. Nevertheless, he 'offered a powerful framework for medieval and later christian thinkers who needed to understand and describe the confrontation between the Christian and Islamic worlds'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 434). The last Byzantine historian Laonicus Chalcondyles, 1423-1490, took the 'Histories' as a model for his treatment of the wars between Byzantium and the Turks. 'As European horizons expanded, the Herodotean model became more and more attractive and valuable, and the wonders that Herodotus described came to seem no more implausible than the marvels of modern India or Mexico' (The Classical Tradition). He had also supporters for his accuracy and reliability in great scholars as Joseph Scaliger and Isaac Casaubon. It is no wonder that the first Dutch translation of this work found many avid readers in the Netherlands, whose fleet during its Golden Age expanded the horizons of Europe, and whose merchants roamed all over the world, and where there was much interest in the Turkish expansion in the Levant and Central Europe, and fear for their religion, the Islam. The readers were ably served by the Dutch medicin and historian Olfert Dapper, 1636-1689, who also wrote on travels through exotic destinations in Asia and Africa, books which were translated into German, French and English. O. Dapper recommends in his preface Herodotus also to his christian readers because his Histories confirm, complement, eludicate biblical history. 'Wat nu de nuttigheyt aengaet, die uit de schriften van dezen schrijver te scheppen is, zulx blijkt hier uit voornamelijk, dewijl hij verscheidene historien verhaelt, die met de bybelsche historien over-een-komen; zoo dat hy niet alleen op vele plaetsen licht aen de historien der heilige schrift verleent; maer hy bevestight ook daer mee het gezagh en de zekerheit der geheele Christelijke leere in de herten der vroomen.' (Preface p. (XIX)) In the preface of this book on offer, at the beginning of the 'Voor-reden aen den Lezer' we find 2 leaves (2*4 and 3*1) with largely the same text. The binder obviously forgot to cancel one of them, probably 3*1. On these leaves Dapper discusses the chronology of the beginning of the world. There are some differences concerning references to bible books, and historical dates. (Provenance: small label on the front pastedown of one: 'Tideman'. In pencil on front flyleaf: 'Brussen, Katwijk', and 'J. Slijper') (Collation: *-6*4 (minus leaf 6*3 & 6*4); A4 (+/-A1), B-Q4 (+/- Q1), R-4V4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130432 Euro 475,00
HESYCHIUS. (HÊSUCHIOU LEXIKON. Hesychii dictionarium, locupletiss. ea fide ac diligentia excusum, ut hoc uno, ad veterum autorum fere omnium, ac poetarum in primis lectionem, iusti commentarij vice, uti qui vis possit, & plane nihil sit, quod ad rectam interpretationem desyderari hic queat.) (Hagenoae : In aedibus Thomae Anshelmi Badensis, 1521). Folio. 776 columns p. Modern h.cloth. 31 cm (Ref: VD16 H 3184; Hoffmann 2,261: Wiederholung der Aldine; Ebert 9638: 'A corrected reprint of the Aldine' of 1514; Brunet 3,146) (Details: Initial and blank spaces with guide letters for initials; only the first initial has a woodcut capital; the Greek text is printed in 2 columns; the edges of the book block are marbled) (Condition: 20th century restored binding; the back has recently been replaced by black cloth, and the remains of the leather back have been pasted on the black spine; both covers have marbled paper; the covers are worn at the extremes. The first 7 leaves are slightly spotted in the outer margin. This book unfortunately lacks the first leaf with the title on the recto, and with the accompanying short praefatio of Aldus on the verso, and it lacks also the last leaf with the printer's device; nevertheless, the text of the Lexicon is complete, and in excellent condition, from the introduction at the beginning to the 'telos', the end. Occasional old ink annotations in the margins) (Note: The lexicographer Hesychius Alexandrinus compiled his lexicon in the 5th or 6th century A.D. The work offers numerous fragments which enable the reconstruction of corrupt passages in the texts of classical authors. Its worth for classical scholarship lies also in the abundance of data on Greek dialects, and the history of the Greek language. This is the third edition after the editio princeps of Aldus of 1514. The lexicon was edited by Marcus Musurus at the request of Aldus Manutius, who received the manuscript for publication from I. Bardellone) (Collation: a8 (minus leaf a1 title) b - z8, A - B6 (minus leaf B6 printer's mark)). (Photographs on request)
Book number: 017185 Euro 2000,00
HIEROCLES. Hierocles, Upon the Golden Verses of the Pythagoreans. Translated immediately out of the Greek into English (by John Norris) London, Printed by M. Flesher (in London), for Thomas Fickus, Bookseller in Oxford, 1682. 8vo (LIV),166 p. Restored calf 16.5 cm English translation, by John Norris, of: Hierocles. Commentarius in aurea Pythagoreorum carmina. (Ref: ESTC Citation No. R3618; Hoffmann 2,268; Graesse 3,273; Schweiger 1,148; S. Halkett & S. Laing, 'Dictionary of Anonymous and Pseudonymous English Literature', Vol. 2, 1883, p. 1095) (Details: Expertly & recently rebacked. Head & foot of the spine ruled gilt. Name of Hierocles gilt on the back. Double fillet gilt border on both boards) (Condition: Leather on the boards is cracking and worn at the extremes. Corners abraded. Paper yellowing. Title somewhat soiled. Lacking leaf A1, probably a half title, or a blank; the ESTC copy begins also with leaf A2. The online copy of the University of Michigan looks similar to ours, and shows, just as our copy, directly after the title leaf A3. All other copies we have located seem to lack A1. Small name erased on the title with ink. Ink erasion of a longer name on the second leaf and on the last leaf. Upper corner of the second leaf skilfully repaired with paper. Some small inkstains. Upper margin cut short) (Note: The Golden Verses (carmina aurea) are commonly attributed to the Greek philosopher and mathematician Pythagoras, born ca. 570 B.C. on the island of Samos. His life is enshrouded in legend. 'He wrote probably nothing (though works were later fathered on him) and already in Aristotle's day his life was obsured by legend'. (OCD 2nd ed. 903) We know of him through Diogenes Laertius, Plato, Plutarch, Iamblichus, Porphyrius, Hierocles and others. He is said to have taught that the soul is a fallen divinity 'confined within the body as a tomb and condemned to a cycle of reincarnation as man, animal, or plant, from which, however, it may win release by cultivation of an Apolline purity'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 904) He is the founder of a sect, the followers of which obeyed to strict ascetic rules, e.g. not eating flesh of killed animals. Pythagoras' speculations concerning the philosophy of nature were important for the development of mathematics and music theory. He is said to have called the universe kosmos because of its inherent ordered structure. Pythagoras would have interpreted the world as a whole through numbers, the arithmetic study of which he was believed to have originated. His moral teachings were probably tranfered in the archaic form of (often aenigmatic) sayings. The study of the life and work of Pythagoras is obscured by the fact that already the oldest Pythagoreans ascribed their own utterances to the Master of the sect. The proverbial autos epha, Pythagoras himself said so, was considered as an ultimate proof of validity. His Golden Verses were well known among educated readers in antiquity, though the testimonia indicate that the authorship of the Golden Verses poem was already problematical for the ancients. The carmina aurea consist of 71 didactic hexameters. Every scholar who ever looked at these verses seems to have his own opinion about its author, origin and date. (Quot homines, tot sententiae) It is however clear 'from the testimonia that the Golden Verses was highly regarded in late antiquity as a concise formulation of principles of the philosophical life. The Neoplatonists, starting with Iamblichus, probably all used the poem as a propaedeutic moral instruction, preparing the way for philosophy proper'. (The Pythagorean Golden Verses. With introduction and commentary by J.C. Thom, Leiden, 1995, p. 13) Pythagoras' body of thought was incorporated in Platonism, and found followers well into late antiquity. In modern times Pythagoras played an important role in the devolopment of the study of natural sciences. Gallilei, Copernicus and Kepler appealed to him. § The late antique Greek philosopher Hierocles Alexandrinus, 5th century A.D., wrote a elaborate commentary on the Golden verses. This late neoplatonist was influenced by Porphyry (2nd century A.D.), who taught that the union with God could be reached through philosophy and an ascetic life, and by Iamblichus (3rd century), who introduced theosophical fantasies in Neoplatonism, and substited magic for mysticism, and theourgia for theôria. Hierocles was persecuted for his fierce paganism, and was sent into exile. § The learned English philosopher and mystic divine John Norris, 1657-1711, produced, in order 'to doe the World so great a Kindness' an excellent translation of this divine Treasure. (A5 verso). Norris studied classics and philosophy at Exeter-College in Oxford. He was dissatisfied with his tutors, and went on his own directly to sources of ancient wisdom for real inspiration, Aristotele, Plotinus, Proclus, and Plato, his favourite. Norris was elected fellow of All Souls in 1680, and allthough an Oxonian, he is considered to be a member of the Cambridge Platonists, a Cambridge group of philosophers who exercised an important influence during the latter half of the 17th century. They were in favour of tolerance, and considered dogmatic uniformity unattainable. Religion is, they learned, the spiritual life springing up in the soul, and the union with the divine, which manifests itself, very Pythagorean and Porphyrean, through the moral life. This is how Norris begins his preface: 'I design no other apology for the translation of this divine book, than its own great exellency and usefulness to the world'. (A5 recto) In the preface he defends his motives for translating this pagan work against attacks of 'ill-natur'd Christians'. (A5 verso) Norris's translation is not at second hand. He translated the Greek immediately from the Prototype, he says. He expects the English public to be grateful for a trustworthy translation of Hierocles' masterpiece, after the shoddy translation of 1583 by Curterius, 'for Curterius the Latin interpreter is often mistaken in the true sense of the Author, and would have prov'd an 'Ignis fatuus' to me if I had follow'd him'. (b5 recto) (Collation: A8 (minus blank leaf A1, A2 is title page), a-b8, c4, B-L8 M4 (minus blank leaf M4)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120527 Euro 725,00
HIPPOCRATES. Oeuvres d'Hippocrate. Aphorismes, traduits d'après la collation de vingt-deux manuscrits, & des interprètes Orientaux, par M. Lefebvre de Villebrune. Paris, Chez Théophile Barrois le jeune, 1786. 12mo. (II),18;156,(4 approbation) p. Half calf. 13 cm (Hoffmann 2,299; Ebert 9767; Cioranescu 38568) That Hippocrates is still a household name today is a cultural rarity of the first order (The Classical Tradition, Cambridge Mass., 2010, p. 439) (Details: Back ruled gilt. Boards marbled) (Condition: Binding scuffed; rear endpapers spotted) (Note: The Frenchman Jean-Baptiste Lefebvre de Villebrune, 1732-1809, was a physician, scholar and prolific translator. He first practiced medicine, but gave that profession up to study languages. He was professor of Hebrew at the Collège de France from 1791 to 1794, and chief librarian of the 'Bibliothèque de la Nation' from 1794 to 1795. He was a polyglot, who translated a considerable number of works from Greek, Latin, Spanish, Italian, English, German and Swedish into French. His most important translation is that of Athenaeus' Deipnosophistae, the 'Banquet des Savans', 1789/91. His contemporaries reproached him his lack of elegance. He published several Greek/Latin editions of treatises of Hippocrates. Between 1779 and 1782 appeared his bilingual edition (Greek/Latin) edition of the Aphorismi of Hippocrates. He translated medical and historical works, but produced also a Greek/French edition of the Manual of Epictetus (1783), and a Latin/French edition of Silius Italicus, 1781. His four volume translation of Hippocrates, 'Oeuvres d'Hippocrate' appeared between 1786 and 1799. He made for this edition use of Parisian manuscripts in Greek, Arab and Hebrew. This book on offer is one of those four. It was based on his earlier Greek/Latin edition of the 'Aphorismi'. § 'An aphorism (from Greek "aphorismos", "delimitation") is a terse saying, expressing a general truth, principle, or astute observation, and spoken or written in a laconic and memorable form. Aphorism literally means a "distinction" or "definition". (Wikipedia s.v. Aphorism) Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, used the term to denote a concise summary of symptoms and treatments for illnesses. In them Hippocrates summed up the practical wisdom of his day in the art of medicine.His most famous aphorism is the first one: 'vita brevis, ars longa'. His 'Aphorismi' stands out in absolute preeminence over all other writing in the literature of medicine, it is the beginning of medical history)(Collation: a6, b4 (minus blank leaf b4); A-N6, O2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120261 Euro 125,00
HISTORIA AUGUSTA. Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex. Aelianus Spartianus, Iulius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio & Flavius Vopiscus. Isaacus Casaubonus ex vett. libris recensuit, idemque librum adiecit emendationum ac notarum. Paris (Parisiis), Apud Ambrosium & Hieronymum Drouart, 1603. 4to. 2 volumes in 1: (XX),375,(1 blank),(55)(1 blank); 576,34,(2 blank) p. Overlapping vellum (Ref: Schweiger 2,384; Sandys 2,209; Fabricius/Ernesti. 'Bibliotheca Latina' 3,101/02; NP Suppl. 2, p. 298) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints; 2 titles, the first is in red and black, the title of the second part is black only; woodcut printer's mark on title, a thisle within an oval banner, the motto reading: 'Nul ne s'y frote', 'patere aut abstine'; 1 text engraving) (Condition: Vellum age-toned; on of the thongs gone; endpapers renewed, probably in the 19th century before 1879; some slight foxing; right lower corner partly and lightly waterstained) (Note: This collection of biographies of Roman emperors, Caesars and usupers was published for the first time in Milan in 1475. It formed part of a bigger collection of historical texts. It was preceded by 'De XII Caesaribus' of Suetonius, and followed by work of the late antique historians Eutropius and Paulus Diaconus. The French classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, or Isaacus Casaubonus, was the first to publish the biographies written by otherwise unknown authors Aelianus Spartianus, Iulius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio & Flavius Vopiscus, separately in 1603, under the title of Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex. The first part contains the text, the second the exhaustive commentary of Casaubon. The 30 surviving biographies of this collection were probably written between 293 and 330 A.D. They cover the period from Hadrian to Carinus (roughly 117-284/85). The beginning of the collection seems to be lost, and the original title is unknown. It seems obvious that the biographies written by Suetonius, sometime after 100 A.D., are the example for these vitae of later emperors. The collections is one of the most debated and controversial sources for the history of the Roman emperors. The historic value of the 30 biographies is diverse, some seem to be trustworthy and offer useful information, others seem to be fiction, full of wondrous tales, anecdotes and short stories. Some tend to having been written in the tradition of the ancient novel. The obvious falsification of sources and documents rendered the entire collection suspect. Such caution and some of these observations and were already made by Casaubon. 'He revealed some of their inconsistencies and improbable statements. He used considerations of style and content to argue that the works ascribed in the manuscripts to Aelius Spartianus, Aelius Lampridius and Julius Capitolinus could more plausibly be ascribed to a single author. He showed that the collection had been edited and revised, though the job had been done by an incompetent. He denied that the date or purpose of the revision could be precisely fixed: 'Only a prophet could divine what moved the maker of this collection to arrange it in this form' (A. Grafton, Defenders of the text, Cambr. Mass. 1991, p. 148) Nowadays it is believed by most scholars that the collected biographies had only one author, writing for the Roman senatorial aristocracy. 'Generell wird die Geschichte des 2. und 3. Jahrhundert aus dem Blickwinkel der nichtchristlichen stadtrömischen Senatsaristokratie betrachtet und das Kaisertum nach dem Verhalten zu diesem Stand bewertet'. Some believe that the biographies are propaganda for the Roman emperor Julianus Apostata, and his pagan revival ca. 360. The Dutch version of Wikipedia refers to the interesting theory of the historian Jona Lendering, stipulating that the collection is an amusing mockumentary, meant to show that christianity was a un-Roman ideology. Nowadays the collection of the 'Scriptores Historiae Augustae' is referred to as the 'Historia Augusta', and used with care by ancient historians. (Source NP 5, 637/40) (Provenance: Illegeble name on the verso of the front flyleaf, dated 1879) (Collation: â4, ê4, î2, A-3H4; A-4G4, 4H2 (leaf 4H2 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140131 Euro 775,00
HISTORIA AUGUSTA. Historiae Augustae Scriptores VI. Aelius Spartianus, Vulc. Gallicanus, Julius Capitolinus, Trebell. Pollio, Aelius Lampridius, Flavius Vopiscus. Cum notis selectis Isaaci Casauboni, Cl. Salmasii & Jani Gruteri. Cum indice locupletissimo rerum ac verborum. Accurante Cornelio Schrevelio. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Francisci Hackii, 1661. 8vo. (VI),997,(35 index) p., engraved title. Recently repaired calf. 19 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 840035284; Schweiger 2,385; Fabricius/Ernesti, 3,102; Graesse 3,304; Ebert 9831) (Details: Boards with blind double fillet borders; the boards have a blind triple fillet rectangle in the center, and on its corners 4 blind stamped 'fleur de lis'. Frontispiece, depicting the seated goddess Roma; she looks in despair at the capture and humiliation of the Roman emperor Valerianus I (the father of Gallienus) by the Sassanid king Shapur after the battle of Edessa (Syria) in 260 A.D. Shapur, who is on horseback, and holds his foot on the neck of Valerianus, using him as a human footstool when mounting; his horse tramples the Roman eagle; this shocking defeat is narrated by 'Trebellius Pollio' in the short biography of 'Valerianus Pater et Filius') (Condition: The spine is rebacked with cloth, the original backstrip has been preserved and pasted on the back. 2 bookplates and some shelf numbers on the front pastedown. 2 ownership entries on the front flyleaf. Outer margin of the title thumbed, and showing 2 minute tears. Paper in the gutter of the first and last 40 p. waterstained, continuing and gradually disappearing halfway) (Note: This is a 'Variorum' edition of the 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores VI', nowadays referred to as 'Historia Augusta'. A 'Variorum' edition generally offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. Such a plodder was the Dutch editor Cornelius Schrevelius, who taught classics at the 'Schola Latina' at Leiden, where he had been raised himself. In 1642 he succeeded his father, Theodorus Schrevelius, as the rector (Moderator) of the school. He raised at least 11 kids, and fell in 1664 victim to the then raging plague. (A.M. Coebergh van den Braak, Meer dan zes eeuwen Leids Gymnasium, Leiden, 1988, p. 47/55; includes also his portrait). § This collection of 30 biographies of Roman emperors, Caesars and usurpers was published for the first time in 1475. It formed part of a bigger collection of historical texts. The surviving 30 biographies were probably written between 293 and 330 A.D. They cover the period from Hadrian to Carinus (roughly 117-284/85). The collection is one of the most debated and controversial sources for the history of the Roman empire. The historic value of the 30 biographies is diverse, some seem to be trustworthy and offer useful information, others seem to be fiction, full of wondrous tales, anecdotes and short stories. Some tend to having been written in the tradition of the ancient novel. The obvious falsification of sources and documents rendered the entire collection suspect. The French classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, or Isaacus Casaubonus, 1559 - 1619, was the first to publish the biographies written by the otherwise unknown authors Aelianus Spartianus, Iulius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio & Flavius Vopiscus, separately in 1603, under the title 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex'. The first part contained the text, the second the exhaustive commentary of Casaubon. Caution about the use of the 'Historia Augusta' was already made by Casaubon. 'He revealed some of their inconsistencies and improbable statements. He used considerations of style and content to argue that the works ascribed in the manuscripts to Aelius Spartianus, Aelius Lampridius and Julius Capitolinus could more plausibly be ascribed to a single author'. (A. Grafton, 'Defenders of the text', Cambr. Mass. 1991, p. 148). 1611 saw a new edition of the text, corrected by the classical scholar Janus Gruter, 1560-1627. He lectured in Heidelberg, where he was appointed librarian in 1602. For this new edition he used a manuscript from his employer's library, the famous 'Bibliotheca Palatina'. He chose well, for recent research revealed that this 'Codex Palatinus' was the parent manuscript of a number of other manuscripts. This 'Codex Palatinus' was also consulted by the French scholar Claude de Saumaise, or Claudius Salmasius, 1588 - 1653. His edition of 1620 follows the groundbreaking edition of Casaubon. He found that the manuscript from the Royal Library in Paris, on which Casaubon had relied, was inferior to the 'Codex Palatinus'. 'Salmasius Anmerkungen sind höchst schätzbar und erläutern die Sprache, besonders aber die Sachen. Vorzüglichste Ausgabe dieser Schriftsteller'. (Schweiger)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown pasted an armorial bookplate of 'Lavington'. It depicts a dolphin between 2 wings. This bookplate must be connected with 'East Lavington House', residence of the Wilberforce family in West-Sussex. In this mansion was born in 1888 Octavia Wilberforce. She wanted a career in medicin, but her parents were opposed to that idea. Her father became so angry at her decision that he cut her out of his will. She was qualified as a doctor in 1920. She campaigned for women's rights, and in 1927 se set up a convalescent home at Backsettown, for overworked professional women. Her biography was written by Pat Jalland. (www).spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Wwilberforce.htm) § Below this bookplate the label 'From the Wilberforce library, Backsettown'. § On the front flyleaf in ink 'Jo. Conant, e Coll. Pemb. Oxon. 1723'. This is the Reverend John Conant, (Pembroke Hall, Oxford, MA 1730) vicar of Elmsted in Kent from 1736 till his death in 1779. He was born in 1706. (www).thepeerage.com/p24720.htm) § Below the name of the Reverend in ballpoint the name 'Lennart Hakanson', 1939-1987, professor of Latin at the university of Uppsala) (Collation: *4, A-3S8 3T4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130194 Euro 225,00
HISTORIA AUGUSTA. Historiae Augustae Scriptores VI. Aelius Spartianus, Vulc. Gallicanus, Julius Capitolinus, Trebell. Pollio, Aelius Lampridius, Flavius Vopiscus. Cum integris notis Isaaci Casauboni, Cl. Salmasii & Jani Gruteri. Cum indicibus locupletissimis rerum ac verborum. Leiden (Lugd. Batavorum), Ex Officina Hackiana, 1671. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XVI),1049,(79 index); 866,(74 index) p. Overlapping vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 840035187; Schweiger 2,385; Brunet 3,226; Fabricius/Ernesti, 'Bibliotheca Latina' 3,102: 'in qua elegante editione Iani Gruteri, Casauboni et Salmasii notae bono consilio iunctae sunt'; Graesse 3,304; Ebert 9831: 'One of the better editions') (Details: Six thongs laced through the joints. Volume 1 has a frontispiece, engraved by G. Wingendorp, depicting scenes of bloodshed and murder from the HA. Woodcut printer's mark on the first title, a flying eagle, motto: 'movendo'. Volume 2 has an engraved title in the same style as the frontispiece) (Condition: Vellum soiled. Some light foxing) (Note: This collection of biographies of Roman emperors, Caesars and usurpers was published for the first time in 1475. It formed part of a bigger collection of historical texts. The French classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, in Latin Isaacus Casaubonus, was the first to publish the biographies written by the otherwise unknown authors Aelianus Spartianus, Iulius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio & Flavius Vopiscus, separately in 1603, under the title 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex'. The first part contained the text, the second the exhaustive commentary of Casaubon. The 30 surviving biographies of the 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex' were probably written between 293 and 330 A.D. They cover the period from Hadrian to Carinus, roughly 117-284/85. The collection is one of the most debated and controversial sources for the history of the Roman empire. The historic value of the 30 biographies is diverse, some seem to be trustworthy and offer useful information, others seem to be fiction, full of wondrous tales, anecdotes and short stories. Some tend to having been written in the tradition of the ancient novel. The obvious falsification of sources and documents rendered the entire collection suspect. Such caution and some of these observations and were already made by Casaubon. 'He revealed some of their inconsistencies and improbable statements. He used considerations of style and content to argue that the works ascribed in the manuscripts to Aelius Spartianus, Aelius Lampridius and Julius Capitolinus could more plausibly be ascribed to a single author'. (A. Grafton, 'Defenders of the text', Cambr. Mass. 1991, p. 148) 1611 saw a new edition of the text, corrected by the classical scholar Janus Gruter, 1560-1627. He lectured in Heidelberg, where he was appointed librarian in 1602. For this new edition he used a new manuscript from the famous 'Bibliotheca Palatina'. He chose well, for recent research revealed that this 'Codex Palatinus' was the parent manuscript of a number of other manuscripts. This 'Codex Palatinus' was also consulted by the French scholar Claude de Saumaise, in Latin Claudius Salmasius, 1588 - 1653. His edition of 1620 follows the groundbreaking edition of Casaubon. Salmasius found that the manuscript from the Royal Library in Paris, on which Casaubon had relied, was inferior to the 'Codex Palatinus'. 'Salmasius Anmerkungen sind höchst schätzbar und erläutern die Sprache, besonders aber die Sachen. Vorzüglichste Ausgabe dieser Schriftsteller'. (Schweiger) This edition of 1671 is a 'Variorum' edition. It offers the 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. The compiler of this 1671 edition is anonymous, probably the publisher himself. In the short 'praefatio' he tells that his involvement was limited to simply reissueing the Latin text of Salmasius, followed by the complete erudite notes of Casaubon, Salmasius and Gruter, 'rei literariae triumviros'. It is a pity that the prefaces of the three editions have been omitted. Nowadays it is believed by most scholars that the collected biographies had only one author, writing for the Roman senatorial aristocracy. 'Generell wird die Geschichte des 2. und 3. Jahrhundert aus dem Blickwinkel der nichtchristlich stadtrömischen Senatsaristokratie betrachtet und das Kaisertum nach dem Verhalten zu diesem Stand bewertet'. (NP 5,638) (Provenance: on the front pastedown of both volumes has been pasted the engraved armorial bookplate of: 'The Right Honorable Sir John Trollope, Bart, M.P.'. This is probably Sir John Trollope, 1800-1874, 7th Baronet of Casewick in the county of Lincoln, and created Baron Kasteven in 1868. He was a conservative politician, and M.P. for Lincolnshire South. (See Wikipedia 'John Trollope, 1st Baron Kesteven', and 'Trollope Baronets') (Collation: *8, A-4A8 4B4; A-3N8)(minus the 2 last blank leaves 3N7 & 3N8)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130087 Euro 300,00
HISTORIA AUGUSTA. Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex. Aelius Spartianus, Julius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio. Flavius Vopiscus. Ad optimas editiones collati. Praemittitur notitia literaria, accedit index, studiis Societatis Bipontinae. Editio accurata. Zweibrücken (Biponti), Ex typographia Societatis, 1787. 8vo. 2 volumes: (I),XXXVI,308;(1),264,(101),(1 blank) p. Half calf 20 cm (Ref: Not yet in VD18; Schweiger 2,385; Fabricius/Ernesti 3,102; Graesse 3,304; Ebert 9834; G. Burkard, Bibliographie der Editiones Bipontinae, p. 175/77) (Details: Nice copy. Backs with gilt floral motives, and with a red and green morocco shield. Endpapers marbled. Engraved portrait of Hadrian on the first title, Zenobia on the second. Edges dyed red. White paper) (Condition: Touch of wear to the extremities. Ownership entries on first flyleaf) (Note: The 30 surviving biographies of the 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex', nowadays called 'Historia Augusta', were probably written between 293 and 330 A.D. They cover the period from Hadrian to Carinus (roughly 117-284/85). The collection is one of the most debated and controversial sources for the history of the Roman emperors. The historic value of the 30 biographies is diverse, some seem to be trustworthy and offer useful information, others seem to be fiction, full of wondrous tales, anecdotes and short stories. Some tend to having been written in the tradition of the ancient novel. The obvious falsification of sources and documents rendered the entire collection suspect. Until the end of the 19th century it was believed that the 'Historia Augusta' was real history, written by real Roman historians. Nowadays it is considered to be a late antique forgery, or propaganda, or a kind of mockumentary. The 'prolegomena' of this Biponti-edition consist of the observations made by G.J. Vossius, about the 'Sex scriptores' in his 'De historicis Latinis' (1627), followed by the 'Notitia literaria' on the H.A. by J.A. Fabricius & J.A. Ernesti in their 'Bibliotheca Latina' (1774), followed by an 'index editionum'. 'Im Text der 'Scriptores Historiae Augustae' hat die Zweibrücker Ausgabe die deutlichste Übereinstimmung mit der Ausgabe Ulrich Obrechts, Strassburg 1677. Auch ihr Index ist dauraus entnommen'. (Burkard p. 177) (Provenance: On both front flyleaves the name 'Caspari Denzleri' and 'Martin Schmidt, 1938'. On the internet we found in the State Archive of Zürich a manuscript concerning the appointment 'des Herrn Catecheten Caspar Denzler von hier zum Pfarrer der Gemeinde Weinfelden'. (Staatsarchiv Zürich). In the 'Donstagsblatt' (of Zürich) of 26 aug. 1790 he is referred to as 'Knabe'. In 1830 he is mentioned in the 'Verzeichniss sämmtlicher Mitglieder der Schweizerischen gemeinnützigen Gesellschaft' as 'Pfarrer am Spital' of Zürich. In the 'Züriches Wochenblatt' of 13 Oct. of 1834 his death is recorded) (Collation: pi1, a-b8, c2, A-T8, V2; pi1, A-P8, Q8 (minus blank leaf Q8) R-Z8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130230 Euro 125,00
(HOFFMANN, HEINRICH CARL GEORG). Teutsche Volks-Geschichten, aus dem ersten Jahrhundert vor und nach Christi unsres Heilands Geburt. Heidelberg, Bei Mohr & Winter, 1821. 8vo. VIII,342,(2 corrigenda) p., 10 engraved plates, 1 folding map. Hardbound. 24 cm (Ref: Holzmann/Bohatta IV, 10414 s.v. Volksgeschichten) (Details: Contemporary 'Pappband'. The 10 plates, mostly heroic scenes, were drawn by the author, 7 of which were etched by Bauch, and 3 by Schilbach. The map, which was also drawn by the author, is a lithography and shows boundaries in 7 watercolours) (Condition: Cover very worn at the extremities; corners bumped; head & tail of spine damaged; covers spotted; partly foxed; some pencil; inscribed dedication on front pastedown; a former owner has written in pencil on the title: 'Verf. Hoffmann, Heinr. Karl Georg') (Note: A typical example of the German 'Romantik', showing an interest in the ancient roots of the Germans and their 'Volksgeschichten'. The book, which was published anonymously, offers inter alia also a long chapter on 'Die Befreiung Teutschlands durch Hermann den Cherusker'. Books like this were meant to entice the proponents of the Pan-German movement into a stronger sense of unity for a people that was hopelessly devided. The 'akademische Buchhandlung und Verlag' established in 1801 by Jacob Benjamin Mohr has become famous as the Press of the 'Heidelberger Romantik'. The firm published i.a. 'Des Knaben Wunderhorn' by Achim von Arnim and Clemens Brentano, Görres' 'Teutsche Volksbücher' and many more titles which are still read today. In 1815 Christian Friedrich Winter, 1773-1858, an old friend of Mohr, joined as a partner. The cooperation lasted till 1822. Christian Winter was a radical liberal, whose name is closely connected with the 'Vormärz' period and the Revolution of 1848/49. In 1845 he was elected 'Bürgermeister' of Heidelberg. The book is attributed by bibliographers to Heinrich Karl Hoffmann, or Hofmann. This is probably the liberal revolutionary nationalist Heinrich Karl Hofmann (1795-1845), who studied law at the University of Heidelberg, and who later worked as a lawyer for the Hessian state government at Darmstadt. In 1912 Hermann Haupt published a biography on him: 'Heinrich Karl Hofmann, ein süddeutscher Vorkämpfer des deutschen Einheitsgedanken', Heidelberg, C. Winter. Hofmann was also closely connected with the ' Vormärz', and a protagonist of the Darmstadt Blacks) (Provenance: Interesting provenance, on the front pastedown a handwritten dedication by one of the publishers, Christian Friedrich Winter. De dedicatee is 'Herrn Minister General v. Schaefer'. The text reads: 'Seiner Excellenz, dem hochverehrten teutschen Krieger und biedern Vertheidiger des Rechts und der Wahrheit, Herrn Minister General v. Schaefer, mit offener Verehrung, der Verleger C. Winter'. This is Konrad Rüdolf Freiherr von Schäffer, 1770-1833. He was an old war-horse, who fought many battles, first against and later with the French. Since 1814 he was Grand-ducal lieutenant-general of Baden, and head of the 'Kriegsministerium'. At the bottom the signature of Christian Winter) (Collation: *-4, 1 - 21-8, 22-4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140095 Euro 175,00
HOMERUS. Nova clavis homerica: cujus ope aditus ad intelligendos sine interprete Iliadis libros omnibus recluditur. Interspersae sunt selectae Clariss. Virorum Camerarii, Clarckii, Ernesti, (Spondani) cet. annotationes & scholia, opera Joannis Schaufelbergeri. (And:) Nova clavis homerica: cujus ope aditus ad intelligendos sine interprete Odysseae libros omnibus recluditur. Interspersae sunt selectae Clariss. Virorum Camerarii, Clarckii, Spondani cet. annotationes & scholia, opera Joannis Schaufelbergeri. Zürich, Heidegger, Fuesselinus, 1764 - 1768. 8vo. 8 volumes. 1, (XXIV),303,(1 corrigenda); 2, (VIII),327; 3, (VIII),326; 4, 327; 5, (VIII),335; 6, (VIII),352; 7, (II),398; 8, (IV),428 p. Half calf 20 cm (Ref: Engelmann, I,447; Moss, 1,505; Ebert 10081; not yet in VD18) (Details: Backs gilt ruled & with 3 raised bands. Portrait of Homer on the title, engraved by Rod. Holzhalb. Good quality paper. No Greek text, commentary only) (Condition: Bindings used & scuffed. Backs rubbed. 1 head of the spine slightly damaged. 1 small wormhole in the upper margin of the last 14 leaves of volume 1, not affecting the text. 2 names on each of the titles. Small donation inscription on the front pastedown. Volume 4 lacks the 4 preliminary leaves, which contain only a short introduction) (Note: Word for word commentary & explanations in Latin by Johannes Schaufelberger, born in 1727 in Zürich, and, according to the title, teacher (paedagogus) at the school of his hometown. Eckstein even calls him professor. (Eckstein p. 498). Schaufelberger did not impress posterity, but he sure did impress J.W. Goethe, 1749-1832. In a letter addressed to his literary adviser Sophie von La Roche, 1730-1807, the young Goethe wrote on the 20th of November of 1774: 'Hier ein kurzes Rezipe für des werthen Baron v. Hohenfelds Griechisches Studium! 'So du einen Homer hast, ist's gut; hast du keinen, kauffe dir den Ernestischen da die Clärckische wörtliche Uebersezzung beygefügt ist; sodann verschaffe dir Schauelbergs (sic!) 'Clavem Homericam' und ein Spiel weisse Karten. Hast du dies beysammen, so fang an zu lesen die Ilias, achte nicht auf Accente, sondern lies wie die Melodey des Hexameters dahinfliest und es dir schön klinge in der Seele. Verstehst du's; so ist alles gethan, so' du's nicht verstehst, sieh die Uebersezzung an, lies die Uebersezzung, und das Original, und das Original und die Uebersezzung, etwa ein zwanzig, dreisig Verse, biss dir ein Licht aufgeht über Construcktion, die in Homer reinste Bilderstellung ist. So dann ergreife deinen Clavem wo du wirst Zeile vor Zeile die Worte analisirt finden, das Praesens, und den Nominativum, schreibe sodann auf die Karten, steck sie in Dein Souvenir, und lerne dran zu Hause und auf dem Feld, wie einer beten mögt, dem das Herz ganz nach Gott hing. Und so immer ein dreisig Verse nach dem andern, und hast du zwey drey Bücher so durchgearbeitet, versprech ich dir, stehst du frisch und franck vor Deinem Homer, und verstehst ihn ohne Uebersezzung, Schaufelberg (sic!) und Karten. Probatum est. (...) Sagen Sie dem hochwürdigen Schüler zum Troste, Homer sey der leichteste Griechische Autor, den man aber aus sich selbst verstehen lernen muss'. (WA IV, Band 2, p. 204/6, Brief 261; This citation can also be found in: P. Cauer, 'Die Kunst des Übersetzens', 2nd ed., Berlin, 1909, p. 137/8). One can find an English translation of this passage in 'Early and miscellaneous letters of J.W. Goethe, with notes and a short biography' by E. Bell, London, 1884, p. 207). It is just as Goethe told, the work offers a word for word commentary & explanations in Latin of Homer) (Provenance: Name on the title: 'Holik'. On the front flyleaf of all 8 volumes a short inscription that this title was donated in 1817 to the 'Stiftsbibliothek' in Odensee by H. Holik (sometimes spelled Holk), a parish clark (sognedegn) in Danish Hesselager (Fyen)) (Photographs on request) (Heavy book, may require extra shipping costs)
Book number: 130266 Euro 325,00
HOMERUS. Homeri Carmina, cum brevi annotatione. Accedunt variae lectiones et observationes veterum grammaticorum cum nostra aetatis critica, curante C.G. Heyne. Leipzig, London, In Libraria Weidmannia, Apud I. Payne et MacKinlay, 1802 - 1822. 9 volumes in 8. Together more than 5300 p., 5 folding facsimiles of MSS., engravings. Full contemporary black morocco 22 cm (Ref: Hoffmann p. 2,324. Dibdin 2,66/67) (Details: Signed binding: 'Bound by J. Mackenzie' blind stamped on the left upper corner of front pastedown of all 8 upper covers. Mackenzie worked in the 1830s, and was binder to the king. Backs with 5 raised bands, gilt coat of arms on the upper boards. Edges of the boards gilt, the boards have on the inside gilt triple fillet borders. All edges of the bookblock gilt. Dutch paper of excellent quality. Engraved headpieces at the beginning of all 24 books. The Ilias only, the Odyssey was never published. The ninth volume contains the (often lacking) index which was published only in 1822, ten years after Heyne's death) (Condition: Bindings worn and somewhat chafed at the extremes. Bookplate on all 8 front pastedowns) (Note: According to Dibdin a 'truly erudite performance'. The first 2 volumes contain the Greek text, which is formed on Wolf's edition of 1785. The 3rd volume contains the Latin translation, preceded by a catalogue of manuscripts and editions. The remaining 5 volumes contain the commentary, variae lectiones, notes, excursus etc. Heyne collated six MSS, and received some help from Matthai, and from Villoison's edition of the Iliad, in which a Venetian MS of Homer is illustrated with scholia. Dibdin tells that Heyne 'also obtained a copy of Bentley's Homer, in which that profound critic had restored the long-lost digamma') (Provenance: In the center of the front covers a gilt ornament bearing the motto of the British chivalric and most noble Order of the Garter: 'Honi qui mal y pense'. The garter is surmounted by an earl's (?) coronet. Within the garter an eagle that seems to land on, or grasp a crown. On the front pastedowns the armorial bookplate of one the members of the Scottish Fletcher of Saltoun clan. The coat of arms shows a shield adorned with a cross fleury (flory) between 4 escalopes. It is supported by 2 male griffins. Above the shield a demi blood hound collared with a ducal crown. On a banner beneath the shield the motto: 'Dieu pour nous'. This motto, the cross, the blood hound and the griffins are attributes of the Fletcher of Saltoun clan. Of course this cannot have been a book of the famous Scottish book collector Andrew Fletcher of Saltoun, who lived from 1655 to 1716. (See for Fletcher of Saltoun and their coat of arms (i.e cross flory, escalopes, blood hound, griffins and motto, Bernard Burke, 'A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, London 1858, volume 1, p. 392/393. Easier but more elementary is the 'List of Scottish clans' in Wikipedia. From the Rostagni Library. 'The Rostagni private library has been built over a time of 133 years, between 1880 and 2013, by 3 generations of collectors: Augusto Gabinio (1863-1939), internist, his nephew Augusto Rostagni (1892-1961), classical philologist at the University of Turin, and his son Luigi Rostagni (1932), Operational Director. (...) Augusto Rostagni thaught Ancient literature in various Italian Universities. In 1928 he was appointed professor in Latin literature at the University of Turin, an office he fulfilled until his death in 1961. He became one of Italy's most authorative philologists of the 20th century. He held positions of President of the Turin Institute of Classical Philology, Dean of the Department of Literature and Philosophy, Editor of the Rivista di Filologia Classica, President of the 'Accademia delle Scienze di Torino'. He was a well-known member of many Italian and foreign academies and institutions, amongst them the Accademia dei Lincei. The Department of Philology, Linguistics & Classical Tradition of the University of Turin is named after him.' (Burgersdijk & Niermans, Auction sale 340, Leiden, 2014, p.68)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152329 Euro 1200,00
HOMERUS.- FEITH,E. Everhardi Feithii Antiquitatum Homericarum libri IV. Editio accuratior. Amsterdam, (Amstelodami), Apud Salomonem Schouten, 1726. 8vo. (XX0,404,(42 index),(1 addenda),(1 blank) p. Half roan 17.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,368; Brunet 2,1202; cf. Ebert 7397) (Details: Paper of excellent quality. Index auctorum and index rerum et verborum at the end) (Condition: Cover scuffed. Remnants of an old paper label on the back. Paper on both covers worn away) (Note: Not much is known about the Dutch classicist Everhard Feith. The only title he produced was a modest success. It was first published in 1677 posthumously, and reissued in 1720 and 1726 in Amsterdam. It saw a revised and enlarged edition in Strassburg, 1743, and in Napels, 1774. The Dutch schoolmaster J. Terpstra thought it necessary to update the book of Feith, which helped him, he says, to familiarize himself with Homer, for his Antiquitas Homerica, Leiden 1831. All we know about Feith originates from the prologemena to this book, which were written by a distant relative of Feith, Dr. Hendrik Bruman, the Rector of the Schola Latina of Zwolle. Everhardus Feithius was born in the city of Elburg (Elburgi Gerlorum), in the previous century, Bruman tells us. (Natus superiori saeculo) (Pökel says 1597, NNBW ca. 1585). He went to France to study philosophy, Hebrew, but especially Greek. He graduated at the Académie de Béarn (Academia Bearnensis). After his studies Feith settled in France, in La Rochelle, far from the war which was waging in the Low Countries by the Spaniards Spinola ductore. In La Rochelle, a place of assembly for French protestants, he taught Greek. (Graecamque linguam est professus). He is said to have befriended the protestant genius Casaubon, Puteanus and the illustre Thuanus. Then the young man vanished from the face of the earth; he was probably murdered. From the remnants of his papers, of which many were lost haeredum incuria, Bruman published Feith's Antiquitatum Homericarum libri IV in 1677. He did so with the encouragment of the Leiden professor of Greek J.F. Gronovius. This erudite book proofs, Bruman says, that Feith, would he have lived long enough, would have equalled the great scholars of his time. (celeberrima ingenia adaequasset) Bruman added some corrections, references of his own, and an index. § The academy of Béarn, also called university of Orthez, was part of the Calvanistic experiment in the souvereign principality Béarn, in the South of France. It was founded in 1566, and it 'provided facilities second only to Geneva, upon whose academy its structure was modelled'. Ca. 1580 there were chairs for Philosophy, Hebrew and Greek. Hundreds of scholarships were available for protestant students. (Calvinism in Europe, 1540-1620, Cambr. 1994, p. 136) § The first book of the Antiquitatum Homericarum libri IV deals with religion, cults, funerals, magic, rites, the second is on politics, justice, slavery, weddings, the third on food, drink, symposia, the home, hospitality, the fourth is on agriculture, hunting music, games, war, weapons ships. This is an example of Feith's approach: in his discussion on Homeric music (book IV, chapter IV), Feith collects all references to the aulos, syrinx, snares, plectra etc., and tries to eludicate them with quotations from other sources, and references to kindred phaenomena. He looks for material in ancient dictionaries as Pollux and Hesychius, cites the Scholiast and Eustathius, and quotes from Pindar, e.g. about the number of chordae, or the use of a plectrum, also from the Homeric hymns, Anacreon, Plutarch, Aristotle, Athenaeus, Horace and Vergil, etc. Feith's collection of the Homeric passages concerning the usages of the ancients facilitated the researches on Greek and Roman civilization. The work was, according to NNBW incorporated in vol. VI of the Thesaurus Antiquitatum Graecarum of Jacobus Gronovius, 1694-1703. (NNBW 1,850). Feith's work is praised by the great German bibliographer Johann Albert Fabricius in his Bibliotheca Antiquaria. (2nd edition, Hamburg 1716, p. 33) Oldfashioned realia collections of the 19th century still referred to the Feith's Antiquitates Homericae. We have to wait till 2017 to find out what is really special in this book. In that year, so Brill announces, Christiana Panagiota Manolea will publish an article: 'Everhardt Feith, 'De Antiquitatum Homericarum libri IV', a neglected work revisited', in 'Brill's companion to the reception of Homer from Byzantium to the Enlightenment'. Why Monolae spells Everhardt instead of Everhard is not quite clear) (Collation: *8, 2*2, A-2E8 (leaf 2E8 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120519 Euro 190,00
HOOGVLIET,A. Abraham, de Aartsvader. In XII boeken, door Arnold Hoogvliet. De negende druk. Rotterdam (tot Rotterdam), By Hendrik Beman, 1776. 4to. (LIV),288 p., frontispiece, portrait and 12 plates. Half calf 23 cm (Details: Back with 5 raised bands; spine divided by double gilt fillets; title in red and black; engraved printer's mark on the title depicting Athena, resting on a pile of books; at her feet a putto reading a book; the allegoric frontispiece was designed by J. Wandelaar and engraved by Simon Fokke, it depicts Abraham together with Fides (True Faith) before a burning altar. Fides' offer helps Abraham to conquer Vice. Obedience, depicted as a yoked woman (who else?) binds wings to Abraham's feet, to help him accept the yoke of virtue. The portrait of Arnold Hoogvliet was made after a disappeared painting by the Dutch artist Dionys van Nijmegen, and is executed by J. Houbraken. Preceding each of the 12 books is a beautiful engraving of a biblical scene from the life of Abraham, made and executed by Jan Punt. The engravings are dated 1743/45; the margins of the gatherings are uncut) (Condition: Cover worn, especially at the extremes; shield of the second compartment on the back gone; small hole in this second compartment; wear to the paper on both boards; front pastedown gone; hinges cracked, but strong, some faint and small waterstains in the lower margin of the last 50 pages; some pinpoint worming in the blank lower margin of the last 50 pages, never reaching the text) (Note: The Dutch author Arnold Hoogvliet, 1687-1763, is among Dutch classicists known for his translation of Ovid's Fasti, which was published in 1719. This translation was greeted with enthousiasm by his contemporaries. After this success he had to promise his dying father, that he would, after this work full of heathen worship, write a work full of christian virtues. This promise, 'Abraham, de Aartsvader', an epic poem on the arch father Abraham of 12 books, written in rhyming iambic trimeters, was first published in 1728, and made his name. It is considered to be the greatest epic of 18th century Dutch literature. It was reissued in the 18th century 13 times. He was considered to be one of the great Dutch poets of his age. (Van der Aa, 8,2 p. 1175/9; more up to date: literatuurgeschiedenis.nl/lg/18de/auteurs/lg18049.html) This book on offer was originally a kind of de luxe edition, it is printed on thick paper and offers furthermore a nice portrait of the author and 12 engravings by the well known Dutch painter and engraver Jan Punt, 1711-1779)(Collation: *-5*4, 6*4 (minus leaf 6*4, a blank), 7*4; A-2N4)(Photographs on request)
Book number: 151886 Euro 150,00
HORATIUS. Quinti Horatii Flacci Venusini, Poetae Lyrici elegantiss. Opera, grammaticorum XL tam antiquiss. quam neotericorum partim iustis commentariis, partim succinctis annotationibus, singulari studio & amplissimis sumptibus in unum Corpus collectis, illustrata, variisque ac vetustissimus exemplaribus collata, & menda in iisdem sublata, quorum Auth(orum) nomina & ordinem sequens pagina demonstrabit. Iam pridem, iuventutis gratiam et utilitatem post Herculeos labores edita, cum gemino indice rerum, verborum ac sententiarum locupletissimo. Basel (Basileae), Per Sebastianum Henricpetri, 1580. Folio. (XXIV)(XXXVI),2280 columns, (12 index, and printer's mark at the end) p. 19th century full calf. 35 cm (Ref: VD16 H 4874; Schweiger 2,398; Dibdin 2,94; Moss 2,12/13; Ebert 10159; Riedel Horatiana 51) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands; gilt short title in second compartment; woodcut printer's mark on title, depicting a rock on which a hand from heaven strikes fire with a hammer. The fire is aroused by a human head (cloud?) blowing from the sky; the second printer's mark on the verso of the last leaf is a simpler version of the image, now with the addition of the name of the printer 'Sebastian Henric Petri'. The 2 letters 'n' in the name are strangely enough cut backwards mirrorwise; woodcut initials; printed in 2 columns; the poems of Horace, printed in a beautifull Roman letter, are surrounded by commentary, printed in italics, thus more or less suggesting the layout of a medieval manuscript) (Condition: The foot of the spines somewhat chafed; front flyleaf gone; title a bit soiled; old name on the title; occasional yellowing paper; occasional some faint and small waterstains; small wormhole in the blank right upper corner of some 80 leaves, not affecting text; the binder erroneously switched leaf Ee1 and Ee6 ) (Note: The works of the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65-8 B.C., have enjoyed a continuous presence in European culture. His memorable phrases made him the most quoted ancient author. Till well into the 20th century he stood central in school curricula. Earlier, in the Middle Ages, he was next to Vergil the most important school author. Horace is transmitted in around 300 medieval manuscripts. The Renaissance saw the beginning of a flood of editions. 'For Neo-latin poetry until modern times, and for all the vernacular literature of Europe from the 16th through the 18th centuries, Horace provided the dominant model both for private lyrics celebrating wine and love and for public lyrics celebrating affairs of state'. Young poets used Horace to learn the trade. 'Horace's elegant rationalism and moral wisdom, and also his disabused and tolerant tone, made his poems favorite reading during the Enlightenment'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 454/60) This edition of Horace is a kind of Variorum edition. It offers the observations and emendations of 40 Horace scholars, old and new, including the commentaries of the scholiasts Helenius Acron and Porphyrius. It does not break new ground, Lambinus seems not to exist, but it is a real treasure chest for Horatian philology, supplying all what is worth knowing of Horace and his poetry. It is a reissue of the edition of 1555, which was produced by the German classical scholar Georg Fabricius, 1516-1571. 'Seine Ausgaben von Vergil, Horaz und Ovid zeichnen sich nicht nur durch philologische Akribie aus, sondern sind auch wegweisend für die Interpretation'. (NDB 4,734) A remarkable feature of this edition is the space which is attributed to the Ars Poetica. Commentaries, treatises on the AP by Landinus, Luisinus, Grifolus Lucinianensis, Iason & Gabriel de Nores, Parrhasius, Amarbachius & Freigius, fill almost a quarter of the book. It is a pity that Robertello's work on the Ars Poetica was not included. Still this 1580 edition is declared to be indispensable by Dr. Harwood: 'This is the great treasure of learning bestowed on Horace. My learned and worthy friend Dr. Parr, one of the best classical scholars in this kingdom, many years ago informed me of the distinguished merit of this edition. It contains the observations and remarks on Horache, which were made by the great scholars of that illustrious age, the glorious age of the revival of literature, as well as the criticism of all the old commentators on Horace, Acron, Porphyrion &c'. (E. Harwood, 'A view of the various editions of the Greek & Roman classics', 4th ed., London, 1790, p. 221/222) (Provenance: Name on the title of 'R. Alberda'. This must be a 'Reynt Alberda', or a 'Reint' Alberda'. This christian name is the most frequently used name for men in the Alberda family of Northern Dutch gentry, so it is hard to say who this might be. The handwriting seems to be 18th century) (Collation: * - 2*6, a - c6, A - Z6, Aa - Zz6, AA - ZZ6, AAa- ZZz6. AAaa - DDdd6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 150251 Euro 775,00
HORATIUS. Q. Horatius Flaccus, cum erudito Laevini Torrentii commentario, nunc primum in lucem edito. Item Petri Nannii Alcmariani in Artem Poëticam. Antwerp (Antverpiae), Ex officina Plantiniana, apud Ioannem Moretum, 1608. 4to. (XX),839,(1),(46 index) p. (2 engraved portraits, of Torrentius and Horace) Modern half vellum 26 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,401: 'Commentar zeichnet sich durch Kenntniss der Grammatik'; Dibdin 2,97; Moss 2,14: 'A very beautiful and critical edition'; Ebert 10175: 'some of his corrections are very happy'; Fabricius/Ernesti 1,410: 'Cum erudito commentario Laevini Torentii, bonis Codd. MSS. usi') (Details: Modern and modest binding, antique style; engraved printer's mark on the title, motto: 'Labore et Constantia'; engraved portrait of Torrentius after Gisbert Venius, beneath the portrait 2 distichs by the Antwerp Neolatin poet Johannes Bochius (Jan Boghe); engraved portrait of Horace; woodcut initials) (Condition: Title slightly soiled; ownership entry on the title; right lower corner faintly waterstained) (Note: The works of the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65-8 B.C., have enjoyed a continuous presence in European culture. Till well into the 20th century he stood central in school curricula. Earlier, in the Middle Ages, he was next to Vergil the most important school author. Horace is transmitted in around 300 medieval manuscripts. The Renaissance saw the beginning of a flood of editions. 'For Neo-latin poetry until modern times, and for all the vernacular literature of Europe from the 16th through the 18th centuries, Horace provided the dominant model both for private lyrics celebrating wine and love and for public lyrics celebrating affairs of state'. Young poets used Horace to learn the trade. 'Horace's elegant rationalism and moral wisdom, and also his disabused and tolerant tone, made his poems favorite reading during the Enlightenment'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 454/60) The humanist scholar Laevinius Torrentius, or in Dutch Lieven van der Beke, the editor of this 1608 edition, was appointed bishop of Antwerp in 1576. He was not a theologian, but a philologist, a combination, prelate and scholar, which was not rare in the Renaissance. In his youth he contributed to an edition of Varro's 'De Lingua Latina', Rome 1554. And in 1578 he published with Plantin a valued edition of the Roman historian Suetonius with his commentary. In a letter to Muretus Torrentius declared that his edition with commentary of Horace was ready in 1580, soon after the Suetonius, but that the war between the Spaniards and the Dutch republic was an obstacle for publication by Plantin. Later (1587) he wrote in a letter that the work on Horace was done, except a commentary on the Ars Poetica. Torrentius' Horace was posthumely published by the successor of Platin, his grandson Balthasar Moretus, in 1608. For the lacking part, the Ars Poetica, the publisher could use the text and commentary which had been produced by Petrus Nannius, 1500-1557, born in Alkmaar, and later also rector of the Latin School of that city. In 1539 he came to Leuven to teach on the Collegium Buslidianum. His inaugural lecture there was on the 'Ars Poetica' of Horace. In the preface to the text of the Ars Poetica in the 1608 edition (p. 767/68), written by Valerius Andreas, 1588-1655, we are told that a text and a commentary of the Ars Poetica, which had been produced in Leuven by Nannius, never saw the light, and that he edited Nannius' work (digessi et recensui), after having received a copy through the kind offices of his teacher Andreas Schottus, a Jesuit and humanist friend of Torrentius, to complete the edition of Torrentius. Andreas was a student at the same Collegium where Nannius had taught some 50 years before. Torrentius was also an accomplished neolatin poet, be it that his poetry is predominantly religious. His laudatory hymn on Balathasar Gerards, who murdered the protestant Prince of Orange, the Dutch Pater Patriae, in 1584, made him notorious in the Netherlands.) (Provenance: in ink on the title: 'Bibliothecae Augustini Angiae comparavit L. De Hou.. ....... , 1710'; the book was perhaps once bought from one August d'Enghien, or de Angia) (Collation: *-2*4, 3*2, A-Z4, a-z4, Aa-Zz4, AA-ZZ4, aa-nn4 (leaf nn4 verso blank), A-E4, F4 (minus leaf F4, a blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140138 Euro 460,00
HORATIUS. Quintus Horatius Flaccus. Accedunt nunc Danielis Heinsii De Satyra Horatiana libri duo, in quibus totum poëtae institutum & genius expenditur. Cum ejusdem in omnia poëtae animadversionibus, longe auctioribus. Leiden (Lugd. Batav.), Ex Officina Elzeviriana, 1629. 12mo. 3 parts in 1: (XXXII),239,(1 blank); 296 (recte 286); 250,(4 blank) p. Vellum 13 cm The best and most complete Horace edition of Heinsius (Ref: Willems 314: 'cette édition d'Horace est jolie, et les exemplaires bien conservés se vendent assez cher'; Schweiger 2,403: 'Beste Ausgabe von Heinsius. Sehr sauber, in vollständigen Exx. höchst selten; cf. Dibdin 2,97/98; Berghman 2069: 'Édition jolie et recherchée'; Rahir 285; Copinger 2396; Graesse 3,353; Ebert 10179) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Engraved main title in front, and 2 separate titles; the first, which is bound after the 32 preliminary leaves, bears the date 1628, the second title, which is bound at the beginning of the last volume, is dated 1629. Both titles bear identical woodcut printer's marks, they depict an old man who stands in the shade of a vine-entwined elmtree, thus symbolising the symbiotic relationship between scholar and publisher. The motto is enigmatic: 'Non solus' (not alone), probably indicating the interdependence of publisher and scholar. Our copy matches the copy of Willems, except that the last blank leaf is lacking) (Condition: Cover slightly soiled and scratched; name on the upper margin of the title; bookplate on the front pastedown) (Note: The works of the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65-8 B.C., have enjoyed a continuous presence in European culture. His memorable phrases made him the most quoted ancient author. Till well into the 20th century he stood central in school curricula. Earlier, in the Middle Ages, he was next to Vergil the most important school author. Horace is transmitted in around 300 medieval manuscripts. The Renaissance saw the beginning of a flood of editions. 'For Neo-latin poetry until modern times, and for all the vernacular literature of Europe from the 16th through the 18th centuries, Horace provided the dominant model both for private lyrics celebrating wine and love and for public lyrics celebrating affairs of state'. Young poets used Horace to learn the trade. 'Horace's elegant rationalism and moral wisdom, and also his disabused and tolerant tone, made his poems favorite reading during the Enlightenment'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 454/60) § The famous Dutch scholar and poet Daniel Heinsius, 1580-1655, was born in Ghent. He studied in Leyden and became there the favourite pupil of the genius J.J. Scaliger, whom he succeeded as professor of Greek after Scaliger's death in 1609. Sandys calls Heinsius' work on Greek authors, such as Hesiod and Aristotle better than his work on Latin authors. 'Nevertheless, his criticisms were highly praised by his contemporaries and by his immediate successors'. (Sandys, History of Classical scholarship, p. 314) Heinsius published his first edition of Horace, with his notes, in Leiden in 1612. It became a standard, and was influencial in Holland, France and Britain. This 3 volume set of 1629 is most sought after, because of the clear typography of the Elzevierbrothers, Heinsius useful 'animadversiones' and his masterpiece 'de satira Horatiana libri duo') (Provenance: The name of 'Rob Hesketh' on the title; a bookplate of 'Robert Hesketh esq.' & a small label of 'Rossal Hall Library' on the front pastedown. Both labels depict a corn sheath. This Robert Hesketh might be the Hesketh, 1789-1868, who was British consul in Rio de Janeiro, see the family site of J.J. Heath-Caldwell. The Hesketh family resided in Rossal Hall, in Lancashire) (Collation: *-2*8, A-P8 (leaf P8 blank); a-r8, s8 (minus s8 = blank); A-P8, Q8 (leaf Q6 & Q7 blank, minus Q8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120088 Euro 460,00
HORATIUS. Hekeldichten, brieven en dichtkunst van Q. Horatius Flaccus. In Nederduitsche vaarzen overgebragt door B. Huydecoper. Amsterdam, By d'Erven J. Ratelband en Compagnie, en Hermanus Uitwerf, 1737. 4to. (XX),292,(1 errata) p., frontispiece & portrait. Half calf. 20 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 184323649; OiN p. 212; Geerebaert 111,41,II) (Details: Back gilt, and with an orange morocco shield. Frontispiece by J.C. Philips, showing a rich man in a kind of skybox of a hippodrome being served by 3 servants, an example of the decadent luxury Horatius criticizes. Of the same engraver a portrait of Horatius on the title. A beautiful portrait of the translator Huydecoper, engraved by J. Houbraken after a painting of J.M. Quinkhard, at the beginning of the translation) (Condition: Back rubbed. Wear to the extremes, corners and spine ends; front joint partly split) (Note: Balthasar Huydecoper, 1695-1778, famous Dutch poet, linguist & philologist. He also wrote tragedies like Achilles, and Edipus. He was much praised for his neolatin poetry, and with his translation into Dutch of the 'Satirae' and the 'Epistulae', the 'Ars Poetica' he is said to have revived Horace in the Low Countries. (Van der Aa, 8, 1495/8) (Provenance: name on front endpaper: 'G.A. Loeff, Zwolle 1829'. We found on the internet an 'ingenieur-verificateur en provinciaal bewaarder van het Kadaster te Zwolle', with that name. § On the front flyleaf the name 'J.H. Waszink, 1928'. J.H. Waszink, 1908-1990, a wellknown Dutch classical philologist, who has a short lemma at Wikipedia) (Collation: pi1, *-2*4, 3*2, chi1 (portrait of Huydecoper); A-2N4, 2O2,(2P)1 (minus leaf 2O4) (Gathering G = G1,G3,G2,G4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130202 Euro 140,00
HORATIUS. Quinti Horatiii Flacci Poemata, cum commentariis Joh. Min-Ellii. Praemisso Aldi Manutii de Metris Horatianis Tractatu, & adjuncto indice rerum ac verborum loculetissimo. Editio nova a multis mendis purgata. Leiden, Apud Samuelem Luchtmans, et Fil., 1744. 12mo. (XVI),564,(67 index),(1 blank) p. Calf 15 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,409; cf. Graesse 3,353: 'cette éd. souvent répétée') (Details: Back gilt and with 4 raised bands. Each poem of Horace is followed by many notes and explanations printed in 2 columns) (Condition: Cover scuffed. Head & tail of the spine chafed. Leather spotted, corners bumped. Front flyleaf repaired. One gathering loosening. Some ink stripes. Small stamp and shelf number on the title) (Note: One seldom sees an edition of the Dutch schoolmaster Johannes Min-Ellius, ca. 1625-1670, in good condition. He was educated at the Erasmianum at Rotterdam, and was until his death a Praeceptor at the same school. Minellius, or Min-ellius, produced several school editions of classical authors, such as Vergil, Florus, Terentius and Ovid, with ample annotations in easy Latin. His first school text of Horace, with his numerous notes and commentary was published in 1668 in his hometown Rotterdam. At the end of the 17th and in the 18th century his editions were widely used, not only on Dutch grammar schools, but also on German, English and Danish schools. Schweiger lists editions of Horace in 1668, 1679, 1676, 1695, 1700, 1704, 1708, 1714, 1728, 1739, 1741 and 1759. After that they were barred from the schools because they were too unscientific, and offered too much help. They were esteemed to be pontes asinorum. § Already in antiquity Horace's works were widely studied in ancient schools. Occasional references by later authors demonstrate the continuity of this school tradition, allthough Christian authors admired his form, but distanced themselves from his pagan thoughts. The Carolingian age saw him once again become a school author. During the Renaissance Horace's fame expanded itself together with humanism throughout Europe. His elegance, his moral wisdom, humour and tolerance made him favourite reading, and suitable for schoolboys) (Provenance: On the title a small rubber stamp: 'Centrale Bibliotheek, Gasthuisring 54, Tilburg') (Collation: *8, A-2C12, 2D4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120510 Euro 100,00
HUET,P.D. Histoire du commerce et de la navigation des anciens. Par M. Huet, ancien Evêque d'Avranches, sous-Précepteur de feu Mr. le Dauphin, & l'un des quarante de l'Académie Françoise. Seconde édition, revue. Paris, Chez Antoine-Urbain Coustelier, 1716. 8vo. (XXIV),446,(50 index) p. Old marbled boards. 17 cm (Ref: Sandys 2,292/3) (Details: Margins uncut, woodcut illustration on the title) (Condition: Binding worn. Back faded. 2 old paper labels on the back. Library stamp on the title) (Note: The French cleric and scholar Pierre Daniel Huet, 1630-1721, was coadjutor in the tuition of the Grand Dauphin, the son of Louis XIV, future king. He was also general editor and organiser of the wellknown series of Delphin Classics. Among patrologists he is best known for his edition in 1668 in Rouen of Origenes' 'Commentaria in Sacras Scripturas'. In the preface to this history of ancient commerce Huet explains that it was commissioned by 'monsieur Colbert, ministre et sécretaire d'état'. Il ne falloit pas, Monsieur, une autorité moindre que la vôtre, pour me faire quitter les autres études qui m'occupent (...) pour en entreprendre une autre si differente , & vous rapporter l'Histoire du Commerce & de la Navigation des Anciens'. Colbert did so, Huet tells, in his quality of 'Intendant general du Commerce & de la Navigation de ce (France) Royaume'. (Préface p. 1/2) Colbert, 1619-1683, who was a kind of minister of Finance, improved the state of French manufacturing and brought the economy back from the brink of bankruptcy, during the rule of king Louis XIV, who fought many expensive wars. Colbert succeeded in creating a favourable balance of trade, and in increasing France's colonial holdings. Colbert saw that if his country wanted to compete with the Dutch Republic and England, he had to promote French industry and commerce. He worked 'to ensure that the French East India Company had access to foreign markets, so that they could always obtain coffee, cotton, dyewoods, fur, pepper, and sugar. In addition, Colbert founded the French merchant marine'. (Wikipedia) Colbert died in 1683, and Huet's histoire was only published in 1716, 33 years after his death, by the Parisian publisher François Fournier, who owned, according to the 'Extrait du Privilege du Roy' the right to print this title. He apparantly gave his colleague Antoine-Urbaine Coustelier permission to publish another edition. At the end of the 'Privilège du Roy' has been added 'Imprimé pour la seconde fois, le 1. Sept. 1716'. (p. b4 verso) In the 'avertissement du libraire' immediately after the title, the publisher confesses that monsieur Huet, then 86 years old, thought this work 'si peu convenable à son âge, & à la profession', that he wanted it rather to lay buried in dust on the shelves in his 'cabinet' than publish it. It was only after the prayers of his friends, lovers of literature and supporters of the interest of the state, that he gave permission to publish this work of his youth. (p. a1 recto & verso) Huet apparantly took the trouble to revise his work and prepare it for an second edition. It was a success. It was reissued in France in 1727 and 1763, translated into English (1717), German (1763 & 1775) and Italian (1737)) (Provenance: Stamp on the title: 'Ex bibliotheca Comit. de Krassow-Divitz'. This book probably comes from the library of Karl Reinhard Adolph Graf von Krassow, 1812-1892. There may however be other members of this noble family who once owned this book) (Collation: a8, b4; A-2H8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120065 Euro 480,00
HYGINUS GROMATICUS & POLYBIUS. Hygini Gromatici et Polybii Megalopolitani, De castris Romanis quae exstant. Cum notis & animadversionibus, quibus accedunt dissertationes aliquot de re eadem militari populi Romani, R.H.S. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Apud Jodocum Pluymer Bibliopolam, 1660. 4to. Frontispiece,XLV,(1 blank); 20,16,15,(1 blank); 328 (recte 326),(20 index) p., 4 folding plates, some text illustrations. Overlapping vellum 21 cm (Ref: (Ref: STCN p.p. 841375682; Schweiger 2,466; Hoffmann 3,271; Brunet 3,394; Ebert 10139; Graesse 3,404) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints. The frontispiece depicts a Roman soldier who gives instructions for the building of a castrum. Engraved printer's device on the title, within a laurel wreath we see a hand coming out of a cloud, writing on a sheet of paper 'Hac itur ad astra'. Engraved initials) (Condition: Vellum age tanned. Ownership entry on the title) (Note: This title contains the work of 3 experts on the fortification of Roman camps. To the first, the Roman land surveyor Hyginus Gromaticus, who lived in the 2nd or 3rd century A.D. 'has been falsely attributed the incomplete treatise 'De munitionibus castrorum'', (also called 'De castris romanis') 'a handbook of castrametation on a basis more theoretical than practical'. (OCD 2nd ed. s.v. Hyginus 4) Nowadays the author is referred to as Pseudo Hyginus. (Castrametari means to 'pitch a camp', and a 'groma' is a land surveyor's measuring-rod) § In the introduction to this work, the editor, translator and commentator R(adbodus) H(ermannus) S(chelius) argues that the art of Roman warfare was admired in antiquity by Philippus of Macedon and Pyrrhus of Epirus, for its perfection and its results. The building of a strong and well organized camp was a vital part of the Roman strategy. Such a camp, with its walls and tents, was the homestead and a second fatherland of every Roman soldier. ('Patria altera est militaris haec sedes, vallum pro moenibus & tentorium suum cuique militi domus ac penates sunt'. p. a4 recto) And in modern times, he goes on, especially the Commanders of the armed forces of The Netherlands (in Belgio) have studied and thus revived the noble art of Roman warfare. They were successful on the battlefield, because they had studied Roman tactics, reinstated Roman discipline, and stopped the plundering and looting of armies on the move. They waged war just like the Romans, 'ratione' and 'disciplina'. (p. c1 recto) Therefore the Dutch Republic is considered nowadays, he says, to be the seat of discipline and the school of warfare. (Sedes disciplinae & Schola rei Militaris) Schelius thinks here of course of Princes Maurits and Frederik Hendrik of Orange. Maurits, 1567-1625, 'organised the Dutch rebellion against Spain into a coherent, successful revolt and won fame as a military strategist'. 'Maurits set out to revive and revise the classical doctrines of the Romans and pioneered the new European forms of armament and drill'. (Wikipedia, Prince Maurice of Orange). Another successful Dutch commander in the war against the Spaniards was Prince Frederik Hendrik, 1584-1647, who could read Latin, and had studied mathematics and the 'ars gromatica', or the art of land surveying, in Leiden. § The Latin text of Hyginus is printed twice. The first text is printed in 2 columns, and the heading is 'De castramentione liber'. It is printed as a facsimile of a medieval manuscript. Then follows the same text, now edited and emended after this 'manuscript'. The huge commentary numbers 143 pages. Hyginus was an expert on the fortification of camps, and his work is more theoretic. § More practical is the following treatise on 'castrametatio' of the Greek historian and expert on Roman warefare Polybius, c. 200 - c. 118 B.C. (Book VI, 26/10-36) The Greek text is accompanied by a facing Latin translation. Polybius was a mentor and friend of Scipio Aemilianus. In 134 BC he took over the Numantine War (143-133 BC), restored the discipline of the Roman army, besieged Numantia and destroyed it. He was a and acquired first hand knowledge of Roman warfare, when he followed Scipio on his campaign against Hannibal in the Third Punic War. The Flemish humanist Justus Lipsius based his treatise 'De Re Militaria' (1585) on this 6th book of Polybius. The Dutch States General sent after its publication at once a copy to Maurits. § The third expert is the Dutch nobleman and warrior Radboud Herman Schele, or in Latin Radbodus Hermannus Schelius, born in 1622. After his studies and his tour through Europe, he joined the armed forces of the Duke of Tuscany, eager to learn on the battlefield the use of arms, tactics, the deployment of troops, sieges etc. At the same time he was engaged in comparing modern warfare with that of the Romans. Soon the Duke promoted him to a high post. After 4 years he returned home and applied himself to poetry and the study of Roman historians and authors who wrote on tactics and warfare. His aim was to have the generals of his time understand that they could improve their skills and tactics if they took advantage of the tactical writings and examples provided by the Romans. He died young in 1662. Schelius' work was appreciated by the 'founder' of 'Altertumswissenschaft', the German scholar F.A, Wolf. He starts a chapter on 'Kriegswesen' with this edition of 1660. He calls the commentary of Schelius 'ein nützlicher Commentar', with 'Uebersetzung' & 'Noten'. (F.A. Wolf, 'Vorlesungen über Alterthumswissenschaft, vol. 5, Leipzig 1835, p. 252) J.G. Graevius, professor of Classics at Utrecht, and probably his teacher at the Athenaeum of Deventer, wrote a funeral oration for him, and Nicolaas Heinsius composed an elegy on his death. Graevius also incorporated the work of Schelius in the 10th volume of his 'Thesaurus Antiquitatum Romanarum'. (Van der Aa 17, p. 248/251) His portrait, made by R. Vinkeles, can be admirede at www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/RP-P-OB-64.041) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in pencil 'Dr. Brinkgreve'; on the title in ink 'Brinkgreve B179'. This is Dr. Marius Roelof Johan Brinkgreve, 1888-1966, a Dutch teacher of classics at the gymnasium of Utrecht, (1912-1919), later till 1937 the director of 'Koninklijke Begeer', a silver-factory in the small town of Voorschoten. He was a fascist, circa 1933 party official of the 'Nationale Unie' and in 1934 leader of the 'Algemeene Nederlandsche Fascisten Bond'. During WW II he sided with the German oppressor. (See for Brinkgreve, 'Repertorium kleine politieke partijen, 1918-1967'; also G. Brinkgreve, 'Schrijvend in 't Aalsmeerder veerhuis, opstellen van Geurt Brinkgreve', 1982, p. 93/105, with a portrait)) (Collation: pi4 (leaves pi1 & p2 blank), a-g4 (leaf g3 verso blank, minus blank leaf g4); *-2*4, 3*2; 2a-b4, 2c1; †-2†4 (leaf 2†4 verso blank); A-M4 (minus blank leaf M4; erroneously overlooked in the STCN formula; the catch word and the pagination between leaf M3 and N1 is correct), N-2X4 (minus blank leaf 2X4) (1 Folding after p. 19, 3 after 318)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130125 Euro 340,00
IAMBLICHUS. Iamblichus, De mysteriis Aegyptiorum, nunc primum ad verbum de Graeco expressus. Nicolao Scutellio Ordinis Eremitarum Sancti Augustini Doctore Theologo interprete. Adiecti de vita & secta Pythagorae flosculi, ab eodem Scutellio ex ipso Iamblicho collecti. Roma (Romae), Apud Antonium Bladum Pontifis Maximi excusorem, (2nd title: Romae, Vicentius Luchrinus excudebat, 1556), 1556. 4to. 2 volumes in 1: (XX),148; (VI),68,(4 index),(2 blank) p. Limp vellum 21 cm (Ref: Edit16 CNCE 52030; Hoffmann 2,389; Ebert 10709: Brunet 3,394; Caillet 5490: 'édition la plus estimée donnant de précieux documents sur l'hermétisme et le magisme qui florissaient chez les grands peuples de l'antiquité') (Details: Latin translation only. Two title pages: woodcut floral ornament central on the first title; woodcut initials; woodcut printer's mark on the second title, depicting a coiling snake, keeping together the branch of a palmtree and an olivetree, beneath the snake 2 little snakes are creeping out of the soil, above this scene flies a pigeon which holds a jewelled ring in its claws; motto: 'fortes fortuna adiuvat'. Of the first titlepage there are at least 3 variants. Edit 16 knows only 2. Our copy (1) has only a floral ornament on it, and the impressum 'Apud Antonium Bladum Pontifis Maximi excusorem'. The Bibliothèque National has a copy (2) which has besides the floral ornament, on both sides of it the coat of arms of the Vatican, and also a longer impressum, to which has been added 'Sumptibus D. Vincentij Luchrini. Cum privilegio Summi Pontifici Adcenium'. It seems that most copies (3) have the ornament, the coat of arms, and a now corrected addition 'Sumptibus D. Vincentij Luchrini. Cum privilegio Summi Pontifici Ad decennium') (Condition: Vellum age-toned and somewhat warped; cover worn at the extremes; small damages to the back skilfully repaired; foot of the spine chafed; both ties gone; paper slightly yellowing; some innocent foxing) (Note: The first and greatest part of this book (148 p.) commonly called 'De mysteriis Aegyptiorum' is a curious guide to the superstions of the late antique world. It is attributed by the best manuscript to the Greek neoplatonist philosopher Iamblichus, ca. 240 - 325 AD. He was a pupil of the Greek philosopher Plotinus, whose teachings he however corrupted 'by introducing theosophical fantasies from alien sources; and his tendency is to substitute magic for mysticism, 'theourgia' for the Plotinian 'theôria'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 538) Iamblichus' greatest merit is his contribution to the further development of the Plotinian system. He also wrote a work of 10 books on Pythagorism, of which 4 books have survived. His most original work goes with 3 different titles; it is commonly called 'De mysteriis Aegyptiorum', or 'Theourgia'. Its original title seems to have been longer, 'The reply of Master Abamon to the Letter of Porphyrius to Anebo, and the Solutions to the Questions it contains'. Porphyrius and Iamblichus, his pupil, disagreed over the practice of theurgia, and 'De Mysteriis' consists mainly of Iamblichus' vicious and hostile response to the criticism of his teacher in his letter to Anebo Porphyrius learned that man can only come to God by contemplation and philosophy. Iamblichus turned to popular pagan religion, ritual and magic. 'Written under the guise of the Egyptian prophet 'Abamon' as a reply to Porphyry's 'letter to Anebo' the original title places the work firmly within the philosophical genre of 'Problems and Solutions'; cast in an epistolary form, it is essentially a series of replies to a set of problems (aporiai) proposed by Porphyry about the nature of the gods and the proper modes of worshipping them'. (C. Addey, 'The prophet Abamon and the dialogues of Hermes: Iamblichus’ De Mysteriis, Porphyry’s letter to Anebo and the Hermetica' (2011)). Iamblichus taught that Greek philosophers like Pythagoras and Plato, first learnt their wisdom from the Egyptians. His theurgia, which took the place of the platonic methaphysics an cosmology, sought its inspiration in Greek and Roman religion. Lustrations, rituals, initiations and magic rites, with their invocations of the gods by their secret names, and their magical manipulations of plants and stones, became important. The 'De Mysteriis Aegyptiorum' was only partly known before this complete translation of 1556. (The editio princeps of the Greek text even dates from 1678) The text was translated by the bishop/scholar Niccolo Scutelli da Trento, or Nicolaus Scutellius Tridentinus, 1490-1542. Not much is known about him. (See the site "cultura-barocca.com") He taught Greek, was also versed in Latin and Hebrew, wrote a treatise 'Plethon in Aristotelem', and translated a number of other works by Plethon, as well as some works of the Neoplatonist Proclus. The translation is preceded by 2 dedications/ introductions. The first, dated 1556, is written by the editor Scipione Bongallo, or Scipio Bongallus, since 1539 bishop of Civita Castellana. The second introduction is by the translator Niccolo Scutelli. Bongallus tells in the first introduction that he edited and published this work of bishop Scutellius posthumously. Scutellius, he says, disposed of a far better manuscript the his predecessors, who offered only bits and pieces. The publishing of Scutelli's translation is a testimonium of his friendship with Scutellius. He commemorates that he was in the best years of his life a pupil of Scutellius, who taught him Greek in Rome. (idque mihi annis vitae melioribus, cum me Roma Graeca elementa doceret, commemorabat (*3 recto)) He also praises cardinal Christophorus Madrutius for having given him the manuscript of the translation, which had come into the cardinal's possession after the death of Scutellius. He dedicates this precious, attractive and usefull work to him. From the second dedication/introduction, dated 1538 (4 year before Scutelli's death, and 18 years before its publication) we gather that the manuscript was probably donated by Scutellius to cardinal Christophorus Madrutius, for Scutellius dedicated it to him. He calls Madrutius 'Pater optime', and offers him gladly the first complete translation of 'De mysteriis' of Iamblichus, a work which was known untill then only in pieces, (conscissus, *3 verso) and which took him many years to finish. In a short 'Pio Lectori' placed after the second introduction Bongallus tells the reader that he added after the 'De Mysteriis' for the recreation of the reader, who is tired of this difficult text, some lighter works of Scutellius. The recreational works are a biography of Pythagoras, and a study of his sect, compiled by Scutellius from the works of Iamblichus. Then follow 9 pages with the translation of 30 Symbola (sayings) of Pythagoras accompanied by elaborate commentary. It ends with a section 'Mathemata', which is on Pythagorean mathematics and the use of mathematics) (Collation: *4, 2*6, A-T4 (minus leaf T3 & T4); AA-KK4 (leaf KK4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130448 Euro 900,00
IAMBLICHUS. Iamblichi Chalcidensis, ex Syria coele De vita Pythagorae, & Protrepticae orationes ad philosophiam lib. II. Nunquam hactenus visi; nunc vero graece & latine primum editi cum necessariis castigationibus & notis, additae sunt in fine Theanus, Myiae, Melissae & Pythagorae aliquot epistolia Gr. & Lat. Iohanne Arcerio Theodoreto Frisio authore et interprete. N. pl., In Bibliopolio Commeliniano, (Colophon at the end: Excudebat Aegidius Radaeus Ordinum Frisiae Typographus Franequerae, 1598), 1598. 4to. (XVI),224;176;80 (recte 78) p. Modern calf antique style 20.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 056031661; Not in VD17; Hoffmann 2,387/88; Ebert 10710; Caillet 5493; Brunet 3,493; Graesse 3,446; Pettegree/Walshby, Netherlandish Books, 16387) (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands. Printer's mark on the title, depicting a woman, the naked truth, seated on a cubus, and holding a radiant sun in her right hand. In her left hand she holds an opened book and a palm leaf. Her feet rest on the globe; the garland of fruit which surrounds her shows a ribbon with the text in Greek: 'Alêtheia Pandamatôr' (Allmighty Truth). Woodcut initials. Text printed in 2 columns, Greek parallel to Latin. At the end have been added 52 pages with 'castigationes et notae' by Arcerius to the 'Life of Pythagoras' and the 'Protrepticae Orationes') (Condition: Boards slightly scratched, endpapers renewed. Some small old ink annotations. Paper yellowing) (Note: This is the 'editio princeps' of the first and second book of a 10 volume encyclopedia on Pythagorism written by the late antique neoplatonist philosopher Iamblichus, ca. 240 - 325 AD, i.e. the 'Biography of Pythagoras' and the 'Introduction to philosophy' (logos protreptikos epi philosophian). 4 of the 10 books survived, the rest is lost. Added are also the 'editiones principes' of 6 letters, now considered to be apocryphical Pythagorean letters, of the women philosophers Theano (3), Mya (1), Melissa (1), and also 1 of Pythagoras himself. This 'editio princeps' was produced by the Frisian scholar Johannes Arcerius, son of Theodoretus, 1538-1604. He was educated on the Schola Latina (of Saint Martin) at Groningen under Regnerus Praedinius. He became the tutor of the sons of a rich Frisian family, and made with them in 1565 an educational tour through France, and there in Besançon he stumbled in the library of the cardinal Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle (p. a1 recto) 'mirabili quodam casu, seu Dei destinatione' upon a Greek manuscript of Iamblichus (p. *2 recto). He immediately saw its uniqueness and importance, and copied it with his own hand. Arcerius studied Latin and Greek and theology, and was appointed Rector of the Hieronymus Gymnasium at Utrecht in 1586. 3 years later he was promoted to a professorship on the recently founded (1585) University at Franeker, where he was asked to give Greek a boost, and to put Franeker on the map. There he had in his first year 8 students, 4 of whom moved with him from Utrecht, among who Johannes Isaacus Pontanus. All living in the house of Arcerius they formed a tight and talented community. Four of them became professor, and the others high state officials. Arcerius also gave his university its first Greek achievement, the 'editio princeps' of a biography the father of philosophy, Pythagoras, by an important Greek author, Iamblichus. (On Arcerius: 'Universiteit te Franeker, 1585-1811', Leeuwarden 1985, p. 452--457, & NNBW 4 58/59) The imprint on the titlepage of this book doesnot mention its place of publishing. In the colophon at the end we find that it was printed on the presses of the Franeker printer Aegidius Radaeus, or Gilles van de Rade. Most libraries mention as place of publishing Heidelberg, some Franeker, sometimes both places are mentioned together, sometimes none at all, or even Amsterdam. A publisher residing in Heidelberg, and a printer working in Frisian Franeker, even for those cosmopolitan days such teamwork seems far-fetched. The place of business of the famous scholarly printer Hieronymus Commelinus was of course Heidelberg, but in 1597, a year before the printing of this book (1598), Hieronymus had died. From 1587 onward he had made his Heidelberg based firm famous with the production of 140 titles of great scholars like Casaubon, Scaliger, Gruter, and Sylburg, with the good use of the manuscripts of the local 'Bibliotheca Palatina'. His wife continued the firm after his death. Hieronymus' cousin Jean Commelin (Johannes Commelinus), also a publisher and an Amsterdam patrician, was asked to help in the settling of his uncle's inheritance, and to look after the firms interests. Until 1604 a great number of scholarly works left the presses at Heidelberg. Then it was discontinued, and Hieronymus huge library was auctioned in the Netherlands in 1607/08. If Johannes Commelinus decided to transfer the project of printing this Iamblichus edition to Franeker, the place of residence of its editor, to make things easier and/or cut expenses, he made a doubtful decision. For this edition obviously did not meet the standards of the great Heidelberg firm. (For Hieronymus Commelinus see NDB 3,333; for Jean Commelin NNBW 10,199/200) We read about complaints about the quality of the text and the Latin translation, and the many errors of the printer. In his 'Benevolo candidoque Lectore' (p. a1 & a2) Arcerius keeps excusing himself for the mistakes he might have made, for, he says, he was completely destitute of help and resources. He keeps asking for understanding and consideration concerning this difficult project. Someone has to be the first and do this extremely difficult and unrewarding work, he argues. He thanks the Dutch scholar Theodorus Canterus, or Dirk Canter, for his help and for having sent him transcripts from the 'Bibliotheca Vaticana', 'ut opinor' he adds cautiously. More than a century later Ludolph Küster, the editor of a much revised, and far better edition of the Iamblichus' 'Life of Pythagoras', pronounced this very harsh judgement on Arcerius and his edition. It is, he says: 'partim injuria temporis, partim librariorum neglentia & imperitia adeo corruptum & deformatum, ut nesciam, an a renatis litteris ullus scriptorum mendis scatens in lucem unquam exierit.' (De Vita Pythagorica liber, edited by L. Küster, Amsterdam 1707, p. *4 recto). The Amsterdam branch of the family continued the 'Commelianum Bibliopolum' from 1597, the year that Hieronymus died, till 1624. (Gruys/De Wolf, Typography & Bibliopolae Neerlandici usque ad annum 1700 Thesaurus, p. 24). VD17 (Verzeichnis der im deutschen Sprachraum erschienenen Drucke des 17. Jahrhundert) doesnot mention this edition. It is apparantly considered a Dutch edition) (Collation: *-2*4 (leaf 2*4 verso blank), A-2E4, 22A-2Y4, a-f4, g2, h-k4, l2. STCN mentions a leaf chi1 after 2Y4. We have compared it with 4 digital copies, and found that none of them has a leaf ch1) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130214 Euro 920,00
IAMBLICHUS. Jamblichus Chalcidensis ex Coele-Syria, In Nicomachi Geraseni Arithmeticam introductionem, et De Fato. Nunc primum editus, in Latinum sermonem conversus, notis perpetuis illustratus a Samuele Tennulio, accedit Joachimi Camerarii Explicatio in duos libros Nicomachi, cum indice rerum & verborum locupletissimo. Arnhem (Arnhemiae), Prostant apud Joh. Fridericum Hagium, Daventriae typis descripsit Wilhelmus Wier, 1667 - 1668. 4to. 3 parts in 1: (IV, frontispiece & title),(IX),181,(3 blank),239,(1) p., mathematical woodcut illustrations. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,388; Ebert 10715; Brunet 3,494) (Details: Greek text with Latin translation. Engraved frontispiece designed by J. van Steegeren, depicting a company of 6 Greek mathematicians, Aristoxenus, Ptolemaeus, Euclides, Nicomachus, Iamblichus and in the midst Pythagoras; title in red and black; occasional woodcut mathematical illustrations; each of the 3 parts has a different title; the 2nd and 3rd part show the imprint: 'Daventriae, typis Wilhelmi Wier, 1667') (Condition: Vellum soiled; endpapers inscribed; 2 bookplates on front pastedown; paper partly severely browned) (Note: This is the 'editio princeps' of a commentary, or paraphrase which the Greek neoplatonic philosopher Iamblichus, ca. 240 - 325 AD, wrote of Nicomachus of Gerasa's (surviving) 'Arithmêtikê eisagôgê', or 'Institutio Arithmetica'. Nichomachus was a neoplatonic philosopher who probably lived ca. 100 AD. The 'institutio' which Nicomachus wrote, is an introduction to the arithmetic knowledge necessary for the understanding of the work of Plato and treatises of the Neopythagoreans. It consists more of less of a compilation of the general number theory of the Pythagoreans. Nichomachus discusses the one/many, even/uneven, several kinds of natural numbers and prime numbers. The Latin translation which Boethius produced in late antiquity of Nicomachus' 'Institutio' has profoundly influenced medieval mathematics. In the 9th century it was translated into Syrian and Arabic. The commentary/paraphrase 'On the introduction of the Arithmetic' of Nicomachus Gerasenus which Iamblichus wrote 2 centuries later, was originally a part of a greater work on Pythagorism, consisting of 10 books, of which the greater part was lost. Neoplatonists and Pythagoreans valued mathematics highly. It was possible, they thought, to acquire knowledge of the universe and ultimately one self through mathematics. So, the most propriate knowlegde to human nature was mathematics.It was understood as the study of the structure of reality. According to Hoffmann the 'De Fato' is the 7th and 8th chapter of Sectio VIII of Iamblichus work 'De Mysteriis Aegyptiorum'. The complete 'De Mysteriis' (On the Mysteries) was first published in Oxford in 1678 by Thomas Gale. So this fragment of 'De Fato' is in fact the 'editio princeps' of a small part (2 chapters) of the 'De Mysteriis'. Iamblichus argued in his 'On the Mysteries' that the gods help man on his way, and that they respond to prayer and offer supernatural guidance. This editio princeps was produced by the Dutch scholar Samuel Tennulius, or Samuel Ten Nuyl, who was from 1667 professor of History and Eloquence of the Academy at Nijmegen. He fled for the French, who were plundering the Eastern part of the Netherlands in 1672, and ended up in Arnhem, an unlikely place for the printing of a the work of a classical author, let alone an 'editio princeps'. He was born in Deventer and was since 1643 the father-in-law of J.F. Gronovius, who in the beginning of his career taught on the Athenaeum at Deventer before his professorship at Leyden. Tennulius is said to have been an excellent linguist and mathematician. Besides this Iamblichus edition he published a fragment of 'De Urbibus' of Stephanus Byzantinus (Amst., 1669), 'Agathemeris Compendiariae Expositionis Geographiae libri II' (Amst., 1671), and an edition of Frontinus (Leiden/Amst., 1675). (Van der Aa 18, p. 63/64 & 'Inventarisatie Egodocumenten tot 1814 deel 1' on the site of 'Onderzoeksinstituut Egodocument en Geschiedenis') Tennulius stayed in Paris from 1659-1660 (why, we donot know), where he closely befriended the famous French classical scholar Henri de Valois, or Henricus Valesius, 1603-1676. In the preface Tennulius tells us of his daily visits to the Frenchman, how deeply he grew attached to him, (ut mittam reliqua amoris vestigia (eius)' p. II), and that he learned a lot of him (ab ore viri pependerim; & vidisse erat erudiri. (p.I)). Valesius not only instructed him, but introduced him also to other Parisian men of letters. Valesius obviously had a high opion of the capacities of his Dutch friend, for he even assigned him to lend a manuscript of Iamblichus from the 'Bibliotheca Memmiana', to make a transcript and to publish it. Tennulius did more than produce an edition of this difficult text of Iamblichus on Nicomachus 'introductio', he also provided a Latin translation, and extensive commentary. The book consists of 3 parts, the first is the Greek text and iuxtaposed Latin translation, at the end of which Tennulius filled 5 pages with a short fragment concerning a treatise of Iamblichus called 'De Fato, which he had found in the Royal Library at Paris. The second part (56 pages) consists of the commentary on Nicomachus 'introductio', which was published by the German genius Joachim Camerarius in Augsburg in 1554. His commentary was the best that was written during the Renaissance. So it seems a wise decision of Tennelius to incorporate this in his edition. (Provenance: The front flyleaves and endpapers in the rear have been inscribed in Italian. On the front endpapers, which has a pair of flyleaves, we find the name of this inscriber: 'ex Bibliotheca Joh. Bapt Riarii Bononiensis Patricii'. This book once belonged to a member of the Bolognese branch of the Italian noble dynasty Riario. It numbers dukes, cardinals and marquises. We donot know which Giovanni Battista Riario inscribed the endpapers. The handwriting, legible, but often difficult, seems contemporary. The inscription seems the concept of a treatise, or is a summary, entitled: 'Della Pittura perfetta Ideale, o bello sublime'. On the flyleaf at the end is what seems to be the layout of a title page for a publication of Riario, entitled: 'Prodromi alla perfetta cognitione dalla strutura'. Riario is designated there as 'G.B. Riario Lombardo Patricio Bolognese'; 2 bookplates have been pasted on the front pastedown. In the centre of the first one an engraved bookplate: 'Ex bibliotheca Michaelis Chasles, Acad. Scientiar. Socii'. Michel Chasles, 1793-1880, was a French philosopher and mathematician, appointed in 1841 professor of the 'École Polytechnique'. (See Wikipedia s.v. Michel Chasles, with his portrait); at the verso of the second front flyleaf: 'Venant de la vente Chasles du mardi 19 Juillet 1881, 3 fr. 20'; then the signature of 'P. Laffitte'. The buyer is the French philosopher Pierre Laffite, 1823-1903. His pupil Émile Littré tells that he gave 'des cours hebdomadaires d'histoire, de morale, de mathématique' in his own appartment. He was a brilliant teacher, who entertained his students even in café Voltaire. He has a statue somewhere in France, and rests at Père-Lachaise. The other bookplate belongs to the Dutch physican and famous bookcollector Bob Luza, who died in 1980, and whose library was auctioned in 1981 by Van Gendt) (Collation: pi2, 3*4, chi1, A-Z4, a-z4, aa4 (leaf aa4 blank and not numbered), bb-gg4, (h1) (h1 not numbered) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130447 Euro 1300,00
IAMBLICHUS. Jamblichi Chalcidensis, ex Coele-Syria, De vita Pythagorica liber, Graece & Latine; ex codice MS a quamplurimis mendis, quibus Editio Arceriana scatebat, purgatus, notisque perpetuis illustratus a Ludolpho Kustero. Versionem Latinam, Graeco textui adjunctam, confecit Vir Illustiris Ulricus Obrechtus. Accedit Malchus, sive Porphyrius, De vita Pythagorae, cum notis Lucae Holstenii & Conradi Rittershusii, itemque Anonymus apud Photium De vita Pythagorae. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Apud Viduam Sebastiani Petzoldi; & filium ejus Christianum Petzoldum, 1707. 8vo. (XVI, including a portrait of Pythagoras),219,(16),(1 blank),67,(1 blank);93; (7 index) p. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,388; Brunet 3,493; Ebert 10711; Fabricius/Harles. Bibliotheca Graeca, 1790 p. 763) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both hinges; engraved frontispiece of Pythagorês Samiôn, with a portrait of a seated Pythagoras, after a coin of Fulvius Ursinus, J. Mulder sculpsit; title in red & black; small woodcut floral ornament on the title; text in 2 colums, Greek and Latin iuxtaposed, at the bottom of the page the notes; at the end the notes of Ritterhusius in Porphyry. A previous owner has bound at the very end 3 leaves, which originate from another book, i.e page 177/181 of 'Jamblichus Chalcidensis ex Coele-Syria, In Nicomachi Geraseni Arithmeticam introductionem, et De Fato. Nunc primum editus, in Latinum sermonem conversus, notis perpetuis illustratus a Samuele Tennulio' Arnhem, 1668. These leaves contain a short chapter called 'Descriptum ex duobus Regiis codicibus fragmentum Iamblichi De fato, opera & versione Samuelis Tennulii'. This fragmentum is in fact a fragment of 'De Mysteriis') (Condition: Vellum somewhat soiled; 3 small ink stains on front pastedown; front flyleaf inscribed with inscriptions from Roman Xanthen. 2 ownership entries on flyleaf; 1 gathering of the preliminary leaves waterstained) (Note: The life of the Greek philosopher and mathematician Pythagoras, born ca. 570 B.C. on the island of Samos, is enshrouded in legend. 'He wrote probably nothing (though works were later fathered on him) and already in Aristotle's day his life was obscured by legend'. (OCD 2nd ed. 903) We know of him through Iamblichus, Porphyrius, Diogenes Laertius, Plato, Plutarch and others. He is said to have taught that the soul is a fallen divinity 'confined within the body as a tomb and condemned to a cycle of reincarnation as man, animal, or plant, from which, however, it may win release by cultivation of an Apolline purity'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 904) He is the founder of a sect, the followers of which obeyed to strict ascetic rules, e.g. not eating flesh of killed animals. Pythagoras' speculations concerning the philosophy of nature were important for the development of mathematics and music theory. He is said to have called the universe 'kosmos' because of its inherent ordered structure. Pythagoras would have interpreted the world as a whole through numbers, the arithmetic study of which he was believed to have originated. His teachings were probably tranfered in the archaic form of (often aenigmatic) sayings. The study of the life and work of Pythagoras is obscured by the fact that already the oldest Pythagoreans ascribed their own utterances to the Master of the sect. The proverbial 'autos epha', Pythagoras himself said so, was considered as an ultimate proof of identity. His body of thought was incorporated in Platonism, and found followers well into late antiquity. In modern times Pythagoras played an important role in the devolopment of the study of natural sciences. Gallilei, Copernicus and Kepler appealed to him. This book contains 2 biographical sketches of Pythagoras by late antique admirers. The Neoplatonic philosophers Porphyrius, born ca. 234 AD in Phoenician Tyros, is the oldest. He probably wrote the 'Live of Pythagoras' with the design of exhibiting Pythagoras as equal to Jesus Christ in his miracles and precepts. Porphyry, a defender of paganism agains chrisitanity, was more a encyclopedic polymath than an original thinker. In his surviving treatises on mathematics, astronomy, music, grammar, rhetorics and history, logic, and in his commentaries he has the good habit of quoting his sources by name. He thus presevered many fragments of older learnings. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 864/65) Porphyry was a student of Plotinus, whose Enneads he edited somewhere after 300. Most of his work is written from a Plotinian point of view. He produced also numerous philosophical commentaries on Plato, Aristotle, Theophrastus and Plotinus. The aim of philosphy is according to Porphyry the union with God, which one might reach through an ascetic life. Porphyri is beside Pythagoras the most famous vegitarian of antiquity. He even wrote a monography on vegetarianism, 'De Abstinentia'. Porphyry's pupil Iamblichus also wrote a biography of Pythagoras. His biography forms part of a much more ambitious project, a 10 volume encyclopedia on Pythagorism, of which 4 books have survived. This biography is the first book. The 2 biographies in this book were edited with commentary and a Latin translation by the Westphalian classical scholar Ludolph Küster, 1670-1716, who spent most of live in the Dutch Republic. He is best known for his 3-volume edition of Suidas, Cambridge 1705. In 1710 he produced a much revised edition of John Mill's Novum Testamentum of 1707. Küster, who was an excellent textual critic and palaeographer, revised also completely the text of the 'De vita Pythagorica liber' which had been plubished previously by the Frisian professor Johannes Arcerius Theodoretus (son of Theodor) in 1598. He was professor of Greek of the universtiy at Franeker since 1589. Arcerius published it with the help of a manuscript of Iamblichus he possessed, but it was of no avail. His edition and its translation are considered to be rubbish. (See for him and his edition Hoffmann 2,387/88, and NNBW 4,58/59). Küster collated for this edition manuscripts of the Royal Library at Paris, the Bodleian Library, and a manuscript from the library of Spanhemius. (Ad Lectorum *4 verso) 'Quod ad versionem Latinam Arcerii, quam prior Edit. habet, attinet, adeo vitiosa est, ut tota pene lituram mereatur'. (**2 verso) Instead Küster chose for his edition the exellent translation of Ulricus Obrecht, Professor of History at Strasburg, which had been published anonymously there in 1700. In his commentary on the live written by Porphyry Küster incorporated the notes of the German scholars Conrad Ritterhusius and Lucas Holstenius, published in 1610 in Altorf, and in Rome in 1630) (Provenance: name on front flyleaf: 'J.B. van de Mortel, 1800'. On http://titven.nl/index.php?title=Aen_den_Honscamp we found that one J.B. van Mortel was burgomaster of Grubbenvorst from 1808 till 1815. Later he was a member of 'Provinicale en Gedeputeerde Staten' of the province of Noord Brabant for the rural communities. On the verso of this flyleaf has been written: 'Ktêma Joh. Hildebrandi Withofii. Anno 1718, Trajecti Batav. Symbolum: Mundus regitur opinionibus'. This is the handwriting of Johann Hildebrand Withof, 1694-1769. After having studied in Germany he went to Utrecht, where he probably bought this book, to finish is studies on the University at Utrecht under Burman and Duker. In 1718 he was appointed rector of the Schola Latina at the Dutch city of Zaltbommel. 2 year later, in 1720 he became professor of rhetoric, Greek and history on the University at Duisburg. His rich library numbered 12000 volumes. (ADB 43,558/59) Withof has also a short lemma in Wikipedia) (Collation: * - 2*4, A - 3E4 (minus 3E3 & 3E4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130449 Euro 325,00
JULIANUS. Les Césars de l'empereur Julien, traduits du grec par feu Mr. le Baron de Spanheim, avec des remarques & des preuves, enrichies de plus de 300 médailles, & autres anciens monumens, gravés par B. Picart le Romain. Amsterdam, Chez F. l'Honoré, 1728. 4to. (XII, including frontispiece),XLII,286,(2);196 p., portrait, numerous text illustrations. Full contemporary calf 26 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,496; Brunet 3,597: 'édition recherchée'; Ebert 10997; Graesse 3,497; Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 338, where the edition of 1683 is mentioned; 4 copies in STCN) (Details: Gilt back with 5 raised bands; red morocco shield in the second compartment. Title in red en black; finely engraved frontispiece depicting a banquet scene with dining and discussing deified Roman emperors; engraved vignette of Julian on title; engraved portrait, depicting at full length a statue of count Jean Matthias de Schoulembourg, commander in chief of the Venetian army, to whom the translation has been dedicated. At the beginning of the dedication an engraved headpiece with the coat of arms of Schoulembourg. Engravings of coins and medals throughout the text, made by the famous Bernard Picart) (Condition: Cover worn at extremities; back rubbed; joints starting to split, but strong; tail of the spine chafed; both boards slightly scratched. Paper yellowing. Some faint foxing. Small wormhole in the blank gutter of 24 leaves, far from the text) (Note: The Roman emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus, 331-363, is the best documented ruler of late antiquity. He was a nephew of Constantine the Great, ca. 280-337 A.D., who had adopted christianity, and imposed it on his empire. For dynastic reasons Constantine in between wiped out in a massacre the boys family. In exile Julian covertly converted to neoplatonic polytheism. Julian was later at the age of 24 appointed Caesar by the successor of Constantine, the emperor Constantius II. In this capacity he proved himself a successful general in Gaule, where he repeatedly drove back and crushed the invading Germanic tribes. After the death of Constantius in 361 Julian openly adopted and promoted paganism. Hence the title 'Apostata', because he was the last emperor who rejected and challenged christianity. He tried to revive the pagan state cult, and to restore the traditional pagan religious practices. His reign however lasted only 18 months, from 361 till 363. 'Julian's voice can be heard memorably in his surviving writings, particularly in his letters, in a fierce denunciation of the people of Antioch (Misopogon, Beard-Hater), and in a satire on his imperial predecessors (Convivium sive Caesares), which ends with a vicious portrait of Christ'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambridge Massachusetts, 2010, p. 500) Julian was both philosopher and a men of letters, and far too human for his time. His work Against the Galileans (Christians), meant to refute christian dogmas, is lost, but partly survives in fragments and excerpts in Contra Iulianum, a work full of slander, by a fierce enemy of Julian, Cyrillus, bishop of Alexandria. A French translation of Julian's satire 'Convivium sive Caesares', commonly called the 'Caesars' was published in 1666 by the Swiss scholar and diplomat Ezechiel Spanheim, 1629-1710. It was repeated in 1683 in Paris, and in 1728 in Amsterdam, now with 300 engravings of medals and coins. Spanheim was a prominent name in the field of numismatics, who is best known for his 'De praestantia et usu veterum numismatum' of 1664, revised and enlarged in 1706. In 1680 Spanheim entered the service of electoral of Brandenburg as minister of state. As ambassador of the Great Elector he spent nine years at the court of Paris. After the Peace of Ryswick in 1697 he returned as ambassador to France where he remained until 1702. In that year he went on his final diplomatic mission, as first Prussian ambassador to England. He died in London in 1710, having eaten too much grapes, Clericus tells us. On the very day of the coronation of Frederik I as king of Prusia, (18th of January 1701), Spanheim was made Baron, this to thank him for his services. Baron von Spanheim had an encyclopedic knowledge of the ancient world. In 1696 Spanheim published an edition of the Opera omnia of Julian. This 1728 edition is the third of that translation. Spanheim had printed, as is explained by the Swiss/Dutch scholar Jean Clericus, beneath the text observations to help less well informed 'ordinary' men of letters. This ingenious satire is difficult reading, 'being full of erudition, and allusions to many facts, customs, and opinions of Greek and Latin authors'. At the end there are 196 pages with 'preuves des remarques sur les Césars de l'empereur Julien' with remarks and discussions for scholars and more experienced men of letters. The translation, Clericus assures us, 'is written in a pure style, and is very accurate; otherwise that piece of Julian would have lost its beauty. Anyone that compares it with the (earlier) Latin versions of Cantoclarus and Cunaeus, will easily percieve that those translations wanted to be mended, and that many passages were spoiled or unintelligible. Besides, those translators did not write a sufficient number of remarks to make one understand the sense and design of Julian'. (A sympathetic and informative obituary of Spanheim by Johannes Clericus was published in the 'Memoirs of literature, containing a large account of many valuable books, letters and dissertations upon several subjects', Second edition, London, 1722, p. 412-426)) (Provenance: From the Rostagni Library. 'The Rostagni private library has been built over a time of 133 years, between 1880 and 2013, by 3 generations of collectors: Augusto Gabinio (1863-1939), internist, his nephew Augusto Rostagni (1892-1961), classical philologist at the University of Turin, and his son Luigi Rostagni (1932), Operational Director. (...) Augusto Rostagni taught Ancient literature in various Italian Universities. In 1928 he was appointed professor in Latin literature at the University of Turin, an office he fulfilled until his death in 1961. He became one of Italy's most authorative philologists of the 20th century. He held positions of President of the Turin Institute of Classical Philology, Dean of the Department of Literature and Philosophy, Editor of the Rivista di Filologia Classica, President of the 'Accademia delle Scienze di Torino'. He was a well-known member of many Italian and foreign academies and institutions, amongst them the Accademia dei Lincei. The Department of Philology, Linguistics & Classical Tradition of the University of Turin is named after him.' (Burgersdijk & Niermans, Auction sale 340, Leiden, 2014, p.68)) (Collation: pi2 ( French title & frontispiece), +4, *-5*4, 6*2 (minus leaf 6*2); A-2N4; A-2A4; 2B2. (Engraved portrait before leaf +2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152321 Euro 320,00
JULIANUS. IOULIANOU AUTOKRATOROS TA SÔZOMENA KAI TOU EN HAGIOIS KURILLOU ARCHIEPISKOPOU ALEXANDREIAS PROS TA TOU EN ATHEOIS IOULIANOU LOGOI DEKA. Iuliani Imp. Opera quae supersunt omnia, et S. Cyrilli Alexandriae Archiepiscopi Contra impium Iulianum libri decem. Accedunt Dionysii Petavii in Iulianum notae, & aliorum in aliquot ejusdem Imperatoris libros praefationes ac notae. Ezechiel Spanhemius Graecum Iuliani contextum recensuit, cum manuscriptis codicibus contulit, plures inde lacunas supplevit, & observationes tam ad Iulianum, quam ad Cyrillum addidit. Cum indicibus necessariis. Leipzig (Lipsiae), Sumptibus haeredum M.G. Weidmanni & J.L. Gleditschii, 1696. Folio (XVI, including the frontispiece),(64),455,(1 blank); 362,(1),(1 blank); 126,(23),(1 blank); 312 (recte 310); (17 index),(1 blank) p. Full contemporary calf 41 cm. (Ref: VD17 23:296885A; Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 338; Hoffmann 2,493: 'übertrifft alle früheren Ausgaben'; Brunet 3,596; Ebert 10988; Graesse 3,496/97: 'édition réputée la meilleure') (Details: Back with 5 raised bands; title label in second compartment. boards with blind triple fillet borders. The frontispiece, designed by S. Blesendorff and engraved by C.F. Blesendorff, depicts Julian on his throne, and standing in front of him Cyrillus; they are looked upon from above by the pagan god Hermes, at his side a pagan Greek philosopher, and by 2 female Christian angels. Title in red & black. engraved vignette on the title: depicting a vase from which thick smoke emerges; above the smoke in Greek: 'apollumenos euphrainei'. Greek text and Latin translation juxtaposed; several text engravings) (Condition: Binding scuffed, especially at the extremities. Spine ends chafed and with slight damage. Paper yellowing, sometimes browning, as is usual with Weidmann books of this period. Some faint foxing. Lacking the half title with the text 'Iuliani Imp. Opera, et S. Cyrilli contra eundem libri decem. Gr. Lat.', which should have been before the frontispiece) (Note: The Roman emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus, 331-363, is the best documented ruler of late antiquity. He was a nephew of Constantine the Great, ca. 280-337 A.D., who had adopted christianity, and imposed it on his empire. For dynastic reasons Constantine in between wiped out in a massacre the boys family. In exile Julian covertly converted to neoplatonic polytheism. Julian was later at the age of 24 appointed Caesar by the successor of Constantine, the emperor Constantius II. In this capacity he proved himself a successful general in Gaule, where he repeatedly drove back and crushed the invading Germanic tribes. After the death of Constantius in 361 Julian openly adopted and promoted paganism. Hence the title 'Apostata', because he was the last emperor who rejected and challenged christianity. He tried to revive the pagan state cult, and to restore the traditional pagan religious practices. His reign however lasted only 18 months, from 361 till 363. 'Julian's voice can be heard memorably in his surviving writings, particularly in his letters, in a fierce denunciation of the people of Antioch (Misopogon, Beard-Hater), and in a satire on his imperial predecessors (Caesars), which ends with a vicious portrait of Christ'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambridge Massachusetts, 2010, p. 500) Julian was both philosopher and a men of letters, and far too human for his time. His work Against the Galileans (Christians), meant to refute christian dogmas, is lost, but partly survives in fragments and excerpts in Contra Iulianum, a work full of slander, by a fierce enemy of Julian, Cyrillus, bishop of Alexandria. This Julian edition was produced by the Swiss cosmopolitan scholar and diplomat Ezechiel Spanheim, 1629-1710, a prominent name in the field of numismatics, who is best known for his monumental 'De praestantia et usu veterum numismatum' of 1664. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of the ancient world. We quote the opinion of the Dutch/Swiss classical scholar Daniel Wyttenbach, 1746-1820: 'Spanheimius multa, non multum legerat; at eruditio ejus censeri debeat multidine ac varietate, non vi ac ratione'. (Sandys, 'A history of classical scholarship' , N.Y., 1964, vol. 2 p. 327) The translations of Julian's works into Latin were made by the French Jesuit scholar Dionysius Petavius (Denys Pétau), 1583-1652, whose notes on Julian are also incorporated. Cyrillus work against Julian is translated by the French author Nicolaus Borbosius (Nicolas Bourbon), 1574-1644, and the French Hellenist Johannes Aubertus (Jean Aubert), who died in 1650. He was professor Greek at the Sorbonne) (Provenance: On the front pastedown: 'J.R. D'Arnay, E.P.P.L. 1734'. On the blank margin under the frontispiece: 'Studeri, 1726'. As there are no initials it is hard to say who this Studerus is. The name seems Swiss. Of the live of the Swiss classical scholar Jean Rodolphe d'Arnay, 1710-1765, next to nothing is known. We found a message about a lecture given by him in 1734 at the university of Lausanne. His function is 'Professeur ordinaire en eloquence et en Histoire'. His only contribution to classical scholarship seems to be his 'De la vie privée des Romains', first published in Lausanne in 1757, Paris, 1760. It apparantly was a success, for it was translated into German (1761), English (1771) and Italian (1771). What does E.P.P.L after his name mean? L for Lausanne? From the Rostagni Library. 'The Rostagni private library has been built over a time of 133 years, between 1880 and 2013, by 3 generations of collectors: Augusto Gabinio (1863-1939), internist, his nephew Augusto Rostagni (1892-1961), classical philologist at the University of Turin, and his son Luigi Rostagni (1932), Operational Director. (...) Augusto Rostagni thaught Ancient literature in various Italian Universities. In 1928 he was appointed professor in Latin literature at the University of Turin, an office he fulfilled until his death in 1961. He became one of Italy's most authorative philologists of the 20th century. He held positions of President of the Turin Institute of Classical Philology, Dean of the Department of Literature and Philosophy, Editor of the Rivista di Filologia Classica, President of the 'Accademia delle Scienze di Torino'. He was a well-known member of many Italian and foreign academies and institutions, amongst them the Accademia dei Lincei. The Department of Philology, Linguistics & Classical Tradition of the University of Turin is named after him.' (Burgersdijk & Niermans, Auction sale 340, Leiden, 2014, p.68) ) (Collation: p8 (minus leaf p1, the half title), a-h4; A-3L4 (leaf 3L4 verso blank); a-d4, e2, f-3q (leaf 2z verso blank, minus leaf 3q4); (3r)-(3y)2 (leaf 3y2 verso blank), (A)-(2Q)4 (pagination of 57/58 omitted), (2R)-(2V)2 (leaf (2V2) verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152322 Euro 425,00
JUSTINUS MARTYR & TERTULLIANUS. Justini en Tertulliani Verantwoording voor de Christenen, tegens de Heydenen; als mede Minutii Felicis t'Samen-spraak tussen Octavius en Caecilius. Ook zijn hier achter by-gevoegt, de brieven van Clemens Romanus en Policarpus. Amsterdam, Gedrukt by Jan Rieuwertsz, Haarlem, By Jan Gerritsz. Geldorp, Boek-verkopers, 1684. 8vo. (VIII),183,(1 blank);117,(1 blank),73,(1 blank);47,(1 blank),11,(1 blank),13,(3 blank) Vellum 16 cm An interesting collection of translations into Dutch of early Christian works (Ref: OiN 236 Justinus, 'integrale vert. van Apol. 1-2'; titles of Tertullianus, Minucius, Clemens Romanus & Polycarpus not in OiN; 6 copies in NCC) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Manuscript title on the back. Woodcut initials. The Letter of Clemens has a separate title page, indicating that this is the 3rd impression) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled & scratched; upper corner of the front pastedown torn off. A few pinpoint wormholes in the uppermargin of the last 150 p., not affecting the text. After the 8 preliminary pages there seem to missing 2 leaves, probably with a portrait) (Note: At the beginning of the preface the publisher declares that when he wanted to bring on the market once more the Dutch translation of C. Boon of the 'Apologeticum' of Tertullian & the 'Octavius' of Minucius Felix, he asked Dr. Petrus Langedult to produce a new translation of the 'Apologiae' of Justinus Martyr. Langedult also added, he tells, very extensive notes to 3/4 of his translation. He however died untimely at the age of 37, so the last quarter is without his learned notes. The translated Greek and Latin texts, the publisher goes on, show how excellent the first Christians were, in professing and defending their religion against the Jews and heathens. Tertullian and the others lived short after the Apostles, so they can be considered to be their agents. The publisher incites his readers to use the texts against all those who undermine 'our' christian religion, 'soo Joden, Heydenen, als Atheisten'. When and where the translations of Boon were published previously is hard to tell. In Worldcat and in Picarta we found no earlier copies. We only found a reference to an earlier edition of his translation of Tertullian and Minucius Felix in the 'Bibliotheca Furliana', the catalogue of the library of an eighteenth century Rotterdam citizen. There we find the listing of these 2 works translated by C. Boon, and published in 1671 in Rotterdam by Ryckhals. In the usual biographic reference works we also found nothing about this 'C. Boon'. More is known about the translator of the Greek text of the 'Apologiae' of Justinus, Langedult. He was born in 1640 in Haarlem, and established himself there as a medical doctor. He had a great knowledge of Jewish antiquities and the churchfathers, and is the author of some poetry and theological works. He died in 1677. His widow and some friends seem to have had some of his work published posthumely, e.g. this translation. This translation of Justinus Martyr with learned notes is however not recorded in the lemma about him in the 'Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek. (NNBW 5,309/10) At the end of the book we find a translation of the first 2 letters, which are traditionally ascribed to Clemens Romanus I. He was at the end of the first century AD the 2nd, 3rd or perhaps the 4th bishop of Rome. Both letters are also known as the 'epistles of Clement'. The translated letter is addressed to the chuch of Corinth. Its title records that this is already its third edition. A Dutch translation of these epistles was published earlier in 1656 by P. Casteleyn in Haarlem. At the very end we find the short and edifying letter of Polycarpus, bishop of Smyrna, who died in 156 AD., to the Corinthians, and the letter of Polycarpus to the Philippenses) (Collation: *4, A-L8, M4 (leaf M4 verso blank), A-M8; A-D8 (leaf D8 & D7 verso blank), A8,(leaf A7 verso and A8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120089 Euro 300,00
JUVENALIS & PERSIUS. D. Junii Juvenalis et Auli Persii Flacci Satyrae: cum Veteris Scholiastae & Variorum Commentariis. Accurante Cornelio Schrevelio. Leiden (Lugd. Bat.), Apud Franciscum Hackium, 1658. 8vo. (XVI),638,(42 index) p. Overlapping vellum 20 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 840202245; Schweiger 2,511; Dibdin 2,154; Moss 2,158/9; Ebert 11242; Graesse 3,520) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints. Shorttitle in ink on the back. The engraved title, which is not signed, is used here for the second time. It was first used for the original edition of 1648, of which this 1658 edition is a reissue; The engraved title of 1648 still bears the name of the engraver, it is executed by the Dutch Golden Age engraver Reinier van Persijn; for this edition of 1658, the X before LVIII was simply filed away from the copper plate, and at the same time the name of Persijn, just beneath the X. The title depicts allegorical scenes: on the left a naked woman sitting on a crocodile, holding in her hand a parrot; then a Janus-headed woman, with bird feet and a tail, holding up in her left hand a Momus-mask, and in her right 2 flaming hearts; in the centre sits on a throne an old woman, holding in her left hand a sack of money (?), and in her right what seems a little flask; on the right in the foreground a king reaching for that sack; he is accompanied by a priest, a farmer (?) and a soldier; in a window central above the old woman we see the ascension of the poet) (Condition: Vellum age-toned and slightly worn. Oddly enough a previous owner has replaced the vanished X in the impressum for a new one in ink. Outer margin of the first 2 leaves sligthly thumbed) (Note: The Roman poet Juvenalis, ca. 55-140 AD, was the last and most influential of the Roman satirists. He 'uses names and examples from the past as protective covers for his exposés of contemporary vice and folly'. His main theme is the dissolution of the social fabric. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 501) The satires of the stoic poet Aulus Persius Flaccus form one 'libellus' of 6 satires, together 650 hexameters. 'They are well described as Horatian diatribes transformed by Stoic rhetoric'. 'He wrote in a bizarre mixture of cryptic allusions, brash colloquialisms, and forced imagery. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 805) This edition of 1658 is a 'Variorum' edition. It offers the 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. Such a plodder was the Dutch editor Cornelius Schrevelius, who taught classics at the Schola Latina at Leiden, where he had been raised himself. In 1642 he succeeded his father, Theodorus Schrevelius, as the rector (Moderator) of the school. He raised at least 11 kids, and fell in 1664 victim to the then raging plague. His first Juvenal edition he published in 1648, and it was reissued by Hackius in 1658, 1664 and in 1671. Schrevelius' aim was to promote the studies of his young students and to instill in them a necessary fear (optatam metam), which will make them useful citizens and the pride of their parents. Juvenal is a suitable author for such an enterprise, for he flogs wrongdoers, and learns them to avoid the path of wickedness and to embrace honesty. (Dedicatio p. *2 verso). Especially in shameless times as ours, he continues, satyre is needed. Decent behaviour and faith have been replaced by deceit and swindle. In a short 'Benigno Lectori' (*4 verso and *5 recto) Schrevelius tells that he relies for the text on the earlier editions of Robertus Stephanus and Pithoeus, and that he excerpted the notes and commentaries of Lubinus, Farnabius and Casaubon. In addition he offers, he says, a complete and emendated edition of the old Scholiast. Schrevelius even used two excellent manuscripts which were lent to him by the Leiden professor Salmasius, which helped him to solve many difficult problems. The engraved title deserves some attention. The easiest description we found was 'an engraved title with many figures'. To us, it seems an allegorical scene based on the tenth satire, Juvenal's famous declamation on the folly of men in desiring in their prayers from the gods vane things as honor, fame, wealth, power, beauty, or a long life, instead of a sane spirit in a healthy body. 'Whole households have been destroyed by the compliant gods in answer to the masters' prayers. In camp (nocitura militia) and city (nocitura toga) alike we ask for things that will be our ruin'. (Vss. 7/9, in the Loeb-translation of Ramsay) Juvenal offers a list of pityful examples, such as the once powerful Sejanus, who like Libyan general Gadaffi many centuries later was 'being dragged along by a hook, as a show and joy to all'. (Vss. 66/67, translation Ramsay) Victims of their lust for power were Alexander the Great, Xerxes, or the Punic conqueror Hannibal, the man who was once about to destroy Rome. We assume that the royal figure who reaches out for the sack of money, or from whose hands it is being snatched, is Hannibal. The clue for this assumption is the woman on the crocodile. Such a woman was in 17th century iconography the common personification of Africa, for instance on maps. The fate of this scourge of Rome is treated by Juvenal in evocative language in 20 beautiful verses. It begins like this: 'Put Hannibal into the scales; how many pounds' weight will you find in that greatest of commanders? This is the man for whom Africa was all too small'. (Vss. 147/8) Together with the old woman he is the central figure on the title. The positioning of the three woman brings in mind a Triad, a triple diety, such as the Graces, the Moirai or Fates, or the Harpies. The Erinyes, the avenging spirits, sometimes form a trinity too. The standing woman seems to be a mixture of an Erinye and a Harpy. She has some features of such a Harpy, the personification of deamonic powers, and an agent of terrible punishment. She is bare breasted and stands on huge bird claws, with which she abducts the souls of the dead to their doom. In her right hands she holds, instead of the usual horrifying snake, a Momus mask, which personifies satire and mockery, the power to make a fool or ass of someone. In her left hand rest two flaming hearts, catholic imagery, distastful to the protestants, and therefore perhaps reprensenting idolatry. Her double faced Janushead, looking to the future and the past, might be an image of Time. The old woman on the throne is the central figure on the title. To her all movement on the picture is directed. She has the features of Atropos, the riged and inflexible one, the oldest of the 3 Moirai, or Fates, and in iconography often depicted as an old woman. She has power over life and death, and represents the fate that cannot be avoided. She holds Hannibal's fate in her hands. She withdraws the sack of money (power) and offers with her right hand the once mighty suppliant a little flask or a small beaker, with the invitation to poison himself. Juvenal on Hannibal's unglamorous bleak death: 'What then was his end? Alas for glory! A conquered man, he flees headlong into exile, and there he sits, a mighty and marvellous suppliant, in the Kings's antichamber, until it pleases his Bithynian Majesty to awake! No sword, no stone, no javelin shall end the life which once wrought havoc throughout the world: no, but that which shall avenge Cannae and all those seas of blood, a ring (containing poison)'. (Vss. 158/165, translation Ramsay) The engraver follows for this scene the better known version of the Roman historian Livy. In chapter 51 of the 39th book of his History of Rome, 'Ab Urbe Condita' Livy tells that Hannibal took his poison in an 'poculum', a cup/ goblet/ bowl/ beaker) (Provenance: The last owner was Lennart Håkanson, professor of Latin Literature of the University at Uppsala, 1980-1987) (Collation: *8, A-Z8 Aa-Tt8 Vv4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130103 Euro 170,00
JUVENALIS & PERSIUS. D. Iun. Iuvenalis et Auli Persii Flacci Satyrae, cum annotat. Th. Farnabii. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Typis Ioannis Blaeu, sumptibus Societatis, 1668. 12mo. 2 parts in 1: 189,(3 blank) p. Overlapping vellum 14.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,511; Graesse 3,520; Ebert 11237; Brunet 3,631) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Engraved title, depicting a jester and a satyr, both with a mask in their hand; between them a huge soap bubble filled with little human figures, an allegoric image to indicate that the world is full of deceit and vanity. The second part, containing the satyres of Persius, has a title of its own, it is dated 1650, and it shows a woodcut printer's mark of a celestial sphere, flanked by Hermes and Chronus; its motto is 'Indefessus agendo') (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Name cut from the lower margin of the first title without loss of text; the title is skillfully repaired with a strip of paper. Some old and faint ink underlinings) (Note: The Roman poet Juvenalis, ca. 55-140 AD, was the last and most influential of the Roman satirists. He 'uses names and examples from the past as protective covers for his exposés of contemporary vice and folly'. His main theme is the dissolution of the social fabric. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 501) The satires of the stoic poet Aulus Persius Flaccus form one libellus of 6 satires, together 650 hexameters. 'They are well described as Horatian diatribes transformed by Stoic rhetoric'. 'He wrote in a bizarre mixture of cryptic allusions, brash colloquialisms, and forced imagery. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 805) § The greatest scholarly achievement of the English scholar Thomas Farnaby, c. 1575-1647, were his editions of classical Roman poets and playwrights, accompanied by thorough Latin notes, such as Juvenal (1612), the tragedies of Seneca (1613), Martialis (1615), Lucanus (1618), Vergil (1634), Ovid's Metamorphoses (1636), Terentius (1651). In 1612 he published his first edition of Juvenal and Persius. It was probably his greatest success. Graesse lists 22 reissues of this edition between 1612 and 1720. There may be more. 'As a school teacher, a rhetorical theorist and an editor of classical texts, Farnaby was one of the most influential scholars of the early seventeenth century. His schoolbooks on rhetoric were highly popular in the schoolroom, he collaborated and corresponded with some of the most distinguished continental scholars of his day, and his editions contributed greatly to the development of early modern textual criticism'. (DBC 1,308/9)) (Collation: A-H12 (H11 verso and H12 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120093 Euro 140,00
JUVENALIS & PERSIUS. D. Junii Juvenalis et Auli Persii Flacci Satyrae: cum Veteris Scholiastae & Variorum Commentariis. Accurante Cornelio Schrevelio. Leiden (Lugd. Batav.), Ex officina Hackiana, 1671. 8vo. (XVI),604,(42 index) p. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 840013876; Schweiger 2,511; Dibdin 2,154; Moss 2,158/9; Ebert 11242; Graesse 3,520) (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints. Short title in ink on the back. The engraved title, which is not signed, is used here for the third time. It was first used for the original edition of 1648, for a repetition in 1658, and for this 1671 reissue. In 1648 the engraved title still bears the name of the engraver, it is executed by the Dutch Golden Age engraver Reinier van Persijn. The title depicts a complicated allegorical scene: on the left a naked woman sitting on a crocodile, holding in her hand a parrot; then a Janus-headed woman, with bird feet and a tail, holding up in her left hand a Momus-mask, and in her right 2 flaming hearts; in the centre sits on a throne an old woman, holding in her left hand a sack of money (?), and in her right what seems a little flask; on the right in the foreground a king reaching for that sack; he is accompanied by a priest, a farmer (?) and a soldier; in a window central above the old woman we see the ascension of the poet. See for an explanation of the allegory the note below) (Condition: Vellum age-toned and soiled. Boards worn at the extremities. Front hinge cracking but still strong. Front flyleaf loosening. Name on the front flyleaf. Small old inscription on the rear pastedown. Occasional small ink underlinings. Small wormhole in the right lower corner of the first 14 gatherings, never even coming near to the text) (Note: The Roman poet Juvenalis, ca. 55-140 AD, was the last and most influential of the Roman satirists. He 'uses names and examples from the past as protective covers for his exposés of contemporary vice and folly'. His main theme is the dissolution of the social fabric. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 501) The satires of the stoic poet Aulus Persius Flaccus form one 'libellus' of 6 satires, together 650 hexameters. 'They are well described as Horatian diatribes transformed by Stoic rhetoric'. 'He wrote in a bizarre mixture of cryptic allusions, brash colloquialisms, and forced imagery'. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 805) This edition of 1671 is a 'Variorum' edition. It offers the 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. Such a plodder was the Dutch editor Cornelius Schrevelius, who taught classics at the Schola Latina at Leiden, where he had been raised himself. In 1642 he succeeded his father, Theodorus Schrevelius, as the rector (Moderator) of the school. He raised at least 11 kids, and fell in 1664 victim to the then raging plague. His first Juvenal edition he published in 1648, and it was reissued by Hackius in 1658, 1664 and in 1671. Schrevelius' aim was to promote the studies of his young students and to instill in them a necessary fear (optatam metam), which would make them useful citizens and the pride of their parents. Juvenal is a suitable author for such an enterprise, for he flogs wrongdoers, and learns them to avoid the path of wickedness and to embrace honesty. (Dedicatio p. *2 verso) Especially in shameless times as ours, he continues, satyre is needed. Decent behaviour and faith have been replaced by deceit and swindle. In a short 'Benigno Lectori' (*4 verso and *5 recto) Schrevelius tells that he relies for the text on the earlier editions of Robertus Stephanus and Pithoeus, and that he excerpted the notes and commentaries of Lubinus, Farnabius and Casaubon. In addition he offers, he says, a complete and emendated edition of the old Scholiast. Schrevelius even used two excellent manuscripts which were lent to him by the Leiden professor Salmasius, which, he tells, helped him to solve many difficult problems. § The engraved title deserves some attention. The easiest description we found was 'an engraved title with many figures'. To us, it seems an allegorical scene based on the tenth satire, Juvenal's famous declamation on the folly of men in desiring in their prayers from the gods vane things as honor, fame, wealth, power, beauty, or a long life, instead of a sane spirit in a healthy body. 'Whole households have been destroyed by the compliant gods in answer to the masters' prayers. In camp (nocitura militia) and city (nocitura toga) alike we ask for things that will be our ruin'. (Vss. 7/9, in the Loeb-translation of Ramsay) Juvenal offers a list of pityful examples, such as the once powerful Sejanus, who like the Libyan general Gadaffi many centuries later was 'being dragged along by a hook, as a show and joy to all'. (Vss. 66/67, translation Ramsay) Victims of their lust for power were Alexander the Great, Xerxes, or the punic conqueror Hannibal, the man who was once about to destroy Rome. We assume that the royal figure who reaches out for the sack of money, or from whose hands it is being snatched, is Hannibal. The clue for this assumption is the woman on the crocodile. Such a woman was in 17th century iconography the common personification of Africa, for instance on maps. The fate of this scourge of Rome is treated by Juvenal in evocative language in 20 beautiful verses. It begins like this: 'Put Hannibal into the scales; how many pounds' weight will you find in that greatest of commanders? This is the man for whom Africa was all too small'. (vs. 147/8). Together with the old woman he is the central figure on the title. The positioning of the three woman brings in mind a Triad, a triple diety, such as the Graces, the Moirai or Fates, or the Harpies. The Erinyes, the avenging spirits, also sometimes form a trinity. The standing woman seems to be a mixture of an Erinye and a Harpy. She has some features of such a Harpy, the personification of deamonic powers, and an agent of terrible punishment. She is bare breasted and stands on huge bird claws, with which she abducts the souls of the dead to their doom. In her right hands she holds, instead of the usual horrifying snake, a Momus mask, which personifies satire and mockery, the power to make a fool or ass of someone. In her left hand rest two flaming hearts, catholic imagery, distastful to the protestants, and therefore perhaps reprensenting idolatry. Her double faced Janushead, looking to the future and the past, might be an image of Time. The old woman on the throne is the central figure on the title. To her all movement on the picture is directed. She has the features of Atropos, the riged and inflexible one, the oldest of the 3 Moirai, or Fates, and in iconography often depicted as an old woman. She has power over life and death, and represents the fate that cannot be avoided. She holds Hannibal's fate in her hands. She withdraws the sack of money (power) and offers with her right hand the once mighty suppliant a little flask or small beaker, with the invitation to poison himself. Juvenal on Hannibal's unglamorous bleak death: 'What then was his end? Alas for glory! A conquered man, he flees headlong into exile, and there he sits, a mighty and marvelous suppliant, in the Kings's antichamber, until it pleases his Bithynian Majesty to awake! No sword, no stone, no javelin shall end the life which once wrought havoc throughout the world: no, but that which shall avenge Cannae and all those seas of blood, a ring (containing poison)'. (Vss 158/165, translation Ramsay) The engraver follows for this scene the better known version of the Roman historian Livy. In chapter 51 of the 39th book of his History of Rome, 'Ab Urbe Condita', Livy tells that Hannibal took his poison in an 'poculum' cup/goblet/bowl/beaker) (Provenance: Manuscript ownership entry of 'A.J. Enschedé' on the front flyleaf. Adriaan Justus Enschedé, 1829-1896, was a member of a famous Dutch dynasty of printers. His forefather Izaak Enschedé established himself in Haarlem in 1703, and there the firm remained for more than 300 years. The firm was, and still is famous for the quality of its printing of bonds and banknotes. In 1810 they printed the first Dutch banknotes. Adriaan Justus entered the firm and kept it flourishing. From 1857 onward he was also Keeper of the archives of the city of Haarlem. He wrote several books on the history of Haarlem, and on the history of the Wallon Church in the Netherlands) (Collation: *8, A-2R8 2S4 (2S4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130097 Euro 170,00
JUVENALIS & PERSIUS. De Schimpdigten van D. Junius Juvenalis, en Aulus Persius Flaccus, in 't Neerduyts vertaeld door Abraham Valentijn. Leiden, By Johannes vander Linde, 1682. 12mo. (XII),288 p., frontispiece. Vellum 14 cm The first complete translation of Juvenal into Dutch (Ref: Geerebaert 114,7; OiN. 237) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Engraved frontispiece, depicting an allegorical scene: a masked satyr, and a jester, between them a gigantic soap bubble with drinking, singing, dancing, music making people caught inside) (Condition: Vellum soiled & worn, especially at the extremes. A bookplate has been pasted on the front pastedown. Front hinge cracking. Rear pastedown worn) (Note: The Roman poet Juvenalis, ca. 55-140 AD, was the last and most influential of the Roman satirists. He 'uses names and examples from the past as protective covers for his exposés of contemporary vice and folly'. His main theme is the dissolution of the social fabric. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 501) The satires of the stoic poet Aulus Persius Flaccus form one libellus of 6 satires, together 650 hexameters. 'They are well described as Horatian diatribes transformed by Stoic rhetoric'. 'He wrote in a bizarre mixture of cryptic allusions, brash colloquialisms, and forced imagery. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 805) § The dates of the translator Abraham Valentijn are unknown. He was living in the Dutch town of Dordrecht, at least since 1666, where he first was praeceptor (teacher of classical languages) of the local Schola Latina, and later Conrector. He published prose translations of Ovid and of Juvenal, which had some success, for both were reprinted several times. (Van der Aa 19,24) His translation of Juvenal is the first complete translation into Dutch. His biggest contribution to scholarship however was his son François Valentijn, 1666-1727, who has his own lemma at Wikipedia. His son published between 1724 and 1726 a huge and still very important work on the history and culture of the Dutch East Indies) (Provenance: On the front pastedown a bookplate reading: 'Exlibris Jo van de Bergh'. It depicts a woman wearing a Greek chiton. She holds in her hands a long scroll, on which is written in Greek: 'Moysa Orestias'. ('Orestias', means 'of the mountain', in Dutch 'van de berg') The style of the bookplate seems 'art nouveau') (Collation: *6, A-K12, M6, N6. (A3 signs B3, G4 signs G5; H7 = H5)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120094 Euro 280,00
JUVENALIS & PERSIUS. Alle de schimpdichten van Decius Junius Juvenalis, en A. Persius Flaccus, door verscheide dichteren in Nederduitse vaarzen overgebracht. Haarlem, By Wilhelmus van Kessel, 1709. 8vo. 2 parts in 1: (II),(XXXVIII),330; (XX),66 p. Frontispiece. 20th century half vellum 18.5 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 114,19 & 123,3; OiN 237 & 288; Van Doorninck I,166) (Details: Title in red & black. Woodcut printer's mark on title, motto 'Myn glas loopt ras'. The frontispiece, by J. Goeree, is bound after the title, and depicts an allegorical scene of Vices being routed by satyrs with thorn bushes, such as lewdness, avarice, gluttony, treason, hypocrisy etc. In the background stands a monument erected for satirists like Persius and Juvenal. The part with the satires of Persius has its own title page with a different printer's mark, motto: 'sicut lilium inter spinas, Cant. 2') (Condition: front flyleaf removed. Small stamp, 1.5 x 1.5 cm, on the front pastedown, on the title, and on the page with the dedicatio) (Note: The Roman poet Juvenalis, ca. 55-140 AD, was the last and most influential of the Roman satirists. He 'uses names and examples from the past as protective covers for his exposés of contemporary vice and folly'. His main theme is the dissolution of the social fabric. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 501) The satires of the stoic poet Aulus Persius Flaccus form one libellus of 6 satires, together 650 hexameters. 'They are well described as Horatian diatribes transformed by Stoic rhetoric'. 'He wrote in a bizarre mixture of cryptic allusions, brash colloquialisms, and forced imagery. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 805) Translations into Dutch of both satirists were brought together and published by the Haarlem printer Wilhelmus van Kessel. The collection consists of verse translations (Alexandrines), which were mostly published previously elsewhere. Most translations are accompanied by annotations. Other translations are new. Of some of the satires Van Kessel offers 2 translations (Iuv. 1, 3, 7, 10, 16), or even 3 (Iuv. 8 & 13). Of Persius we find 2 translations of satire 3 & 4. In the preface Van Kessel admits that the collection is not quite homogenous, some of the translations are verbal, others are free. He hopes that every reader will choose the translation he likes best. He tells that he could persuade Lukas Schermer to translate for this edition the ninth satire of Juvenal, a satire so immoral that he would only translate it with a varnish of chastety over the horribly offending passages. Satire 9 is often omitted, until this day, from editions and translations for its scandalous homosexual content. The translators of the satires of Juvenal are: L. Bake (10), F. van Bergen (2), A. Bogaert (8), J. de Dekker (14), Delcourt (16), E. Elmeguidi (1,3 & 7), W. de Geest (5), P. van Haps (7), R. Lydius (3), M. van Merwede (13), P. Nuyts (6,8,11 & 13), C. Pierson (1 & 4), L. Schermer (9 & 15), W. Zewel (13), P. Vlaming (12 & 16), J. Westerbaen (8 & 10). (OiN spells some names differently) The translators of the satires of Persius are: J. de Dekker (4), E. Elmeguidi (1,2,3 & 4), C. Pierson (3,5 & 6)) (Provenance: Small stamp of 1.5 cm on title of: 'Verzameling Edwin Engels, Arnhem') (Collation: pi1, *-2*8, 3*4 (minus blank leaf 3*4); A-2C8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120453 Euro 250,00
JUVENALIS. D. Iunii Iuvenalis Aquinatis Satirae XVI. Recensuit et annotationibus instruxit Ernestus Guilielmus Weber, Weissenseas, Philos. Dr. et Professor Gymnasii Wimariensis. Weimar (Wimariae), In novo Bibliopolio, vulgo Landes-Industrie-Comptoir, 1825. 8vo. X,380,(2 corrigenda) p. Half calf 22 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,505: 'Neue Recognition des Textes. Ruperti's Text liegt zum Grunde. Die Interpunktion ist vereinfacht. Die schwierigen Stellen sind trefflich erläutert'; Not in Spoelder p. 554, Enkhuizen) (Details: Prize copy of the Gymnasium of Enkhuizen, including the prize, printed on thick paper; spine divided by double gilt fillets; gilt lettered shield in 'second compartment') (Condition: Cover worn at the extremes; owing to a binder's error the pages in the 23rd and 24th gathering (from p. 353 to 376) have been mixed up, and 4 of those leaves have been bound double) (Note: The Roman poet Juvenalis, ca. 55-140 AD, was the last and most influential of the Roman satirists. He 'uses names and examples from the past as protective covers for his exposés of contemporary vice and folly'. His main theme is the dissolution of the social fabric. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 501) This edition was produced by the German schoolmaster Ernst Christian Wilhelm Weber, born in 1796 in Wissensee. In 1815 he went to Leipzig to study classical philology under Gottfried Hermann. In 1819 he published in Jena a dissertation 'Animadversiones in Juvenalis Satiras'. In 1820 he was appointed rector of the Gymnasium of Weimar, and 3 years later he received the title of professor. In 1826 the firm of Teubner published his edition of Persius. Another contribution to classical scholarship is his edition of Demosthenes' 'Oratio in Aristocratem'. (ADB 41,287/89) (Provenance: The prize, including the coat of arms of Enkhuizen, has been printed for the greater part; names and the occasion have been added by hand; it reads: 'Ingenio Magnaeque Spei Adolescenti Christiano Cramer Hartman propter insignes in artibus humanioribus progressus praemium hoc litterarum, virtutis et diligentiae testimonium, Gymnasii Enchuisani Curatores donarunt cum in secundam classem transscriberetur, ad diem 6 Septembris 1830. It is signed by 'R.J. Jungius, S. Muntendam, Duyvensz, and by 'Me Gymnasii Rectore' A. Hirschig) Spoelder does not mention this kind of prize copy, without the coat of arms on the covers, but with the coat of arms on the prize. Christiaan Cramer Hartman was born in Averhorn in 1817. He died in Utrecht in 1886 (see the Dutch genealogy website of A. Pondes). This is about all that is to be found on Christiaan. His diligence and virtue brought him only a public notice of his marriage with Johanna Spruyt in Utrecht in the 'Opregte Haarlemsche Courant' of the 3rd of May 1862, in Utrecht) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130452 Euro 150,00
LABBAEUS,C. (Ed.) Cyrilli, Philoxeni aliorumque veterum glossaria latino-graeca, & graeco-latina, a Carolo Labbaeo collecta & in duplicem alphabeticum ordinem redacta. Cum variis emendationibus ex MSS. Codd. petitis, virorumque doctorum castigationibus ac conjectaneis, his accedunt glossae aliquot aliae latino-graecae ex iisdem Codd. MSS. quae nunc primum prodeunt. Praeterea veteres glossae verborum juris, quae passim in Basilicis reperiuntur, ex variis perinde Codd. MSS. Bibliothecae Regiae erutae, digestae, & notis illustratae ab eodem Carolo Labbaeo. (Edidit et praefationem adjecit Car. Du Fresne du Cange) (Bound with:) (Aegidius Bucherius) Aegidii Bucherii Atrebatis e Societate Iesu De doctrina temporum commentarius in Victorium Aquitanum, nunc primum post 1177 annos in lucem editum, aliosque antiquos Canonum Paschalium Scriptores, chronologiae Ecclesiasticae illustrandae ac stabiliendae utilissimos. Ad 1: Paris (Lutetiae Parisiorum), Cura & impensis Ludovici Billaine, 1679. Ad 2: Antwerp (Antverpiae), Ex officina Plantiniana Balthasaris Moreti, 1634. (Colophon at the end: 'Antverpiae, Ex officina Plantiniana Balthasaris Moreti, 1633') Folio. 2 volumes in 1: (II),208,(2),246 (recte 244);40 p. ;(XXXII),500,(2 colophon & printer's mark) p. Contemporary calf. 33 cm (Ref: Ad 1: Hoffmann 1,497; Brunet 2,464; Ebert 5608; Graesse 2,317. Ad 2: Beledimar 1921: Ebert 2098b, who gives as date 1633) (Details: Back with 6 raised bands. Ad 1: This collection of glossaria consists of 3 parts, the first two of which have their own title page, each showing a woodcut ornament. The first part contains the Greek-Latin glossaria, the second part the Latin-Greek glossaria. The third part, the last 40 p., contain the Veteres Glossae verborum juris; Ad 2: Title in red & black. An engraving of angels around a IHS-device on the title. Plantin's printers' mark on the verso of the last leaf) (Condition: Cover very worn & very shabby. Leather on the boards abraded. Head & tail of the back chafed. Shield on the back half gone. Corners bumped. Front hinge cracking, but strong. Fold in the front flyleaf. Margins of the first title are thumbed and browning; a few not objectional wormholes in the upper & lower margin, keeping far away from any text) (Note: Ad 1: Philoxenus Alexandrinus was a grammarian who lived in the first century BC. Traces of his work are to be found in later grammarians and lexicographers. (NP Philoxenus 8). Cyrillus, 5th century AD. His Glosses were used by Hesychius, Photius and in the Suda. (NP Kyrillos 5 and 6). Charles Labbé, 1582-1657, was a parliamentary barrister of Paris, who published, with the help of J. Scaliger Glosses on Greek law (1607), and prepared an edition of the Glossaries of 'Cyril and Philoxenus', which was published after his death by Du Cange (1679). (Sandys 2,287). The first part of this work contains Greek-Latin glosses, the second Latin-Greek glosses, followed by emendations; This work was reprinted in London, 1817, etc. as an appendage to the new edition of Stephanus's Thesaurus. Ad 2: Aegidius Bucherius (Gilles Boucher), 1576-1665, was a French Jesuit and chronological scholar. His De Doctrina Temporum commentarius in Victorium Aquitanum of 1634 published for the first time a number of important medieval chronological documents, and other works on the computation of the date of Easter (the cycle of Victorius of Aquitaine). Victorius had written ca. 450 a Cursus Paschalis, in which he introduced a more precise computation of Easter. During the Synode of Orléans of 541 Victorius' computations were accepted by the church. (LMA 8,1629/30). Boucher tells us in the praefatio that he got the MS with the Cursus Paschalis from his fellow Jesuit Jacobus Sirmundus during a visit to Paris in 1615. The editio princeps of and the commentary on the Cursus Paschalis and of the other late antique and early medieval computistical texts laid together with the work of Joseph Justus Scaliger (1579 and 1606) and that of Dionysius Petavius (1627) the foundations of the science of 'Computus', the science of time-reckoning, and of Computus ecclesiasticus, the method to regulate the calender of the church, especially the date of Easter) (Collation: Ad 1: pi1; A-2C4; chi1, A-2A4, 2B2, 2C-2H4; a-e4. Ad 2: *- 4*4, A-3R4 (minus blank leaf 3R4)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 027616 Euro 725,00
LACTANTIUS. L. Coelii Lactantii Firmiani Opera quae extant omnia. Accedunt carmina vulgo asscripta Lactantio. Cum notis Antonii Thysii, J.C. et Eloquentiae Professoris in Acad. Leidensi. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Petri Leffen, 1652. 8vo. (XVI including frontispiece),670;(XXIX index),(5 blank) p. Overlapping vellum 15.5 cm (Ref: Schoenemann 1,227; Graesse 4,66; Ebert 11609; Brunet 3,337) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints. Engraved frontispiece, depicting the first Christian Roman emperor Constantine the Great, ca. 280-338 A.D.; his left foot rests on the head of a destroyed bronze statue of a pagan predecessor, or of the pagan god Zeus; the trunk and a hand which holds the thunderbold, symbol of paganism, lay in the dust before him; in the background a destroyed building, probably a temple. Lactantius dedicated his 'Divinae Institutiones' ca. 320 A.D. to Constantine) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and slightly soiled. Both pastedowns detached. Front endpapers creased. Some small scriblings on the front flyleaf) (Note: The Latin Christian author Lactantius was born ca. 250 A.D. in the Roman province Africa, and he died ca. 325 in Gaul. In the Renaissance Lactantius was sometimes called 'Cicero christianus', the christian Cicero. He went to Bithynia in Asia Minor to teach Latin rhetoric. There he was converted to christianity, and after the beginning of the Great Persecution (of the christians) which ravaged ca. 300, he became an eloquent apologist in defence of christianity. In old age he was tutor to Crispus, son of Constantine the Great, the first 'christian' emperor. His earliest surviving work is 'De opificio Dei' (On the craftmanship of God), in which 'he works out with some elaboration the thesis that the human body shows by its admirable structure the existence of a wise and benificient Creator'. (H.J. Rose, A handbook of Latin Literatur, Ldn, 1967, p. 482) The 'Institutiones Divinae' (Divine Teachings) is his principal work, which probably occupied him for several years. It consists of 7 books. 'Book 1, 'de falsa religione' is directed against the false pagan religion, book 2, 'de origine erroris', treats the machinations of the devil. In book 3, 'de falsa sapientia' Lactantius criticizes Greek and Roman philosophy, the 4th book, 'de vera sapientia et religione' elaborates on the superiority of the Christian faith. Book 5, 'de iustitia' discusses justice brought back by Christ and persecuted by the pagans. Book 6, 'de vero cultu' explains the duties of a christian. In book 7, 'de vita beata' the aim of human existence is considered to be immortality and the nearness of God. The Institutiones Divinae 'give a full and eloquent statement of what Christian doctrine is, with the incidental result that we get a most interesting and very readable account of what an intelligent christian believed in an age so uncritical that the forged Sibylline oracles were accepted without hesitation as genuine documents'. (op. cit. p. 482) Another theological work, now on a small scale, 'de ira Dei, discusses the question in what sense Anger can be attributed to a perfect Being. Gods Anger is part of his power, and a necessary part of his Grace. 'De mortibus persecutorum' is a work of history about the persecution of christians and Gods revenge upon the deadliest of enemies of the Church. Lactantius also wrote a poem 'de ave Phoenice', which treats the legend of the Phoenix. This book contains also a text which is no longer attributed to Lactantius, 'De Pascha'. § In the preface to his edition of Lactantius the Dutch jurist and classical scholar Antony Thys, or in Latin Antonius Thysius, 1603-1665, calls his author 'Ciceronius aemulum', and a 'purissimae latinitatis auctorem'. (p. *5 recto). He was an author who, 'Chistianam religionem dissertissimis libris multum promovit'. (p. *4 recto) Thysius was from 1637 professor of poêsis of the University at Leiden, where he also lectured on 'jus publicum', after 1663 as a professor. In 1655 he succeeded Daniel Heinsius as librarian of the University. Thysius was not a great or original scholar. He manufactured 'Variorum' editions, in which he skillfully compared and contrasted the excerpted material of brighter minds. He also produced an edition of Sallust (1649), Justinus (1650), of the tragedies of Seneca (1651), Valerius Maximus (1651), Velleius Paterculus (1653) and Gellius (1666). Such editions were very popular, and reissued more than once, because they contained everthing a student required. It offered the 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. According to Schoenemann Thysius wisely chose for his Lactantius as source the text, notes and 'variae lectiones' of the edition of Michael Thomasius, Antwerp 1570, though he doesnot tell this in the preface) (Collation: *8, A-2X8 (leaf 2X6 verso blank, 2X7 & 2X8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120097 Euro 375,00
LATINIUS, LATINUS. Latini Latinii Viterbiensis, Bibliotheca Sacra et Profana. Sive observationes, correctiones, coniecturae, & variae lectiones in sacros et profanos scriptores e marginalibus notis codicum eiusdem. A Dominico Macro Melitensi Cathedralis Viterbien. olim canonico theologo, sacrarumque Inquisit. & Indicis Congregat. Consultore, protonotario Apost. ac post. ac Comite Palatino Collectae. Et nunc primum e Bibliotheca Brancaccia in lucem editae. Rome (Romae), Sumptibus Pontii Bernardon, 1677. 2 parts in 1: (VIII, including portrait/frontispiece),(VIII),213,(3); 79(1) p., portrait. Folio. Vellum 33 cm (Details: 6 thongs laced through cover; short title in ink on the back; title in red & black; woodcut printer's mark on title, motto: 'virtuti fortuna comes'; full page portrait of Latinius engraved by Catharina Angela Bussi facing the title; full page portrait of Ioannes Gualterius Slusius engraved by Io. Nolin before the 'dedictatio'; some large woodcut initials) (Condition: Vellum soiled; front joint beginning to split near head of spine; some small holes in front flyleaf; front flyleaf worn, a few small tears in its right margin; 3 small stamps on the title; 2 small inscriptions on the title; small tear in the lower margin of the title repaired; paper age-toned; a few gatherings browning; some pencil; an old Cyprianus specialist once wrote 6 small references in ballpoint on the margins of 2 pages) (Note: The Italian cleric and humanist Latino Latini, or Latinus Latinius, 1513-1593, devoted his long life to his employers and his studies; he held soft jobs as secretary of several cardinals, and devoted the rest of his time to classical studies and that of the churchfathers, especially Tertullian and Cyprianus; When he was a young man he acquired, after an interrupted study of law, a copy of the Gryphius edition of Cicero by the great P. Victorius. He was so touched by the elegance of that work, that he decided to use Cicero as a guide for his style. He was appointed member of the papal committee which had to purge the 'Decretum Gratiani', a legal textbook of Canon law compiled in the 12th century, out of which had grown in time a 'decretorum immensam sylvam' (Page *2 verso). He was rewarded by Pope Gregory XIII with an annual pension of 150 ducati. Latinius produced an edition of Cyprianus, published by Paullus Manutius in 1568, the socalled 'edition Manutiana'. He did however not want to associate his name with this edition. He feared that his reputation was at stake, because he had manipulated the text of Cyprian, where it conflicted with the manuscripts of the Holy Scriptures. (Schoenemann 1, p. 120). He left his manuscripts and books to the Chapter (Capitulum) of the Cathedral of Viterbo (Page *3 verso of this 'vita'). Observations, corrections, conjectures and 'variae lectiones' which he had jotted down in his manuscripts and the margins of his books were published postumely by the theologian Domenico Magri, or Dominicus Macrus, 1604-1672, once Canon (canonicus) of the Cathedral of Viterbo, member of the Inquisition, and proconsul of the notorious Index. The work of Latinius is preceded by a 4 page biography by Magri, the source of the above mentioned data. The work contains Latinius' orderly organized observations etc. on 45 church fathers and on 45 profane classical authors. 34 pages are dedicated to Augustine, and 36 to Hilary of Poitiers, 15 are on Ambrosius and 15 on Tertullian. The collection of Latinius came apparantly into the possession of Magri, because he bequeathed it after his death in 1572 to the cardinal and bibliophile Francesco Maria Brancaccio, 1592-1675 (Page *1 recto). Brancaccio was his former superior, who had been bishop of Viterbo from 1638 till 1670. The cardinal's huge collection of manuscripts and books is now held by the 'Bibliotheca Nazionale di Napoli'. The book is dedicated by the publisher Bernardon to Ioannes Gualterius Slusius the younger, or Jean Walther de Sluse, or Jean Gaultier de Sluse, born in Liege, and of noble birth. He does so, because the book was published at his expenses. Gualterius Slusius was head of the Latin language department of the Vatican Secretariat of State, the 'Secretaria brevium ad principes et epistolarum latinarum' of pope Innocentius XI. It was his task to prepare in Latin the papal and curial documents) (Provenance: 3 small stamps, all the same, of the 'Bibliotheca Gymnasii Arnstadiensis'; in ink below the printer's mark 'Biblioth. Gymnas. Arnstadt'; Arnstadt is a small city 40 km south of Erfurt) (Collation: pi4 incl. portrait of Latinius) *4, a - 2d4; A - C4 D2 E - K4 (minus K3 & K4) (Inserted portrait after pi2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 110250 Euro 425,00
LIBRI DE RE RUSTICA. Marci Catonis ac M. Teren. Varronis De re rustica libri, per Petrum Victorium, ad veterum exemplarium fidem, suae integritati restituti. (Bound with:) L. Iunii Moderati Columellae De re rustica libri XII. Eiusdem De Arboribus liber, separatus ab aliis. Lyon, (Lugduni), Apud Seb. Gryphium, 1548 - 1549. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: 226,(12 index)(2 blank); 491,(17 index) p. 17th century vellum 18 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,1307; Ebert 20741; Fabricius/Ernesti 1,33/34) (Details: 2 thongs laced through both joints. Brown morocco shield with gilt short title on the back. Gryphius' printer's mark on both titles, motto: Virtute duce, comite Fortuna. Occasional woodcut initials. Text printed in italics) (Condition: Vellum soiled. Wear to the upper and lower edge of the shield on the back. Front joint split for 2 cm at the foot of the spine. A few tiny and unobstrusive wormholes in the vellum at the foot of the spine. 1 small ink underlining. Stamp on the lower margin of p. 3. Traces of an old and small ink stain at the outer margin of the first gathering; the ink has left a small damage at the right margin of the title) (Note: Famine (with the plague) was a great problem in France during the first half of the 16th century. There were serious food shortages and outbreaks of disease in the early 1520th. This scourge reached its peak in the crisis of 1545/46 which was perhaps the most terrible year in the history of 16th century Paris. Many thousands died of hunger. This period is marked by a dramatic fall in living standards. The gravity of the situation began to be reflected in the medical and agricultural literature of that time: how to avoid disease and preserve health in times of dearth on a poor diet of gruel, bread, broth and beer. The French humanist schoolmaster Robert Breton, whose ideas were heavily coloured by classical influences, published in 1539 his Agriculturae encomium, in which he emphasized the need to combine theoretical and practical learning in agriculture. 'The food produced in the countryside, he pointed out, was absolutely essential to the existence of the towns and the state itself'. (H. Heller, Labour, science and technology in France, Cambr. 1996, p. 66) Food, especially grain, was not only scarce because of the ignorance and poverty of the peasantry, but also because of warfare. Towards the middle of this century the provision of an adequate food supply became urgent. 'Beyond assuring the subsistence of the population, it as critical to maintaining the momentum of the burgeoning manufacturing sector of the economy. Sustaining profit margins in industry depended on controling wages. Relatively low wages were only possible if the cost of grain (...) could be contained. As a result, one notes a growing preoccupation with agriculture among humanist authors'. (Op. cit. p. 65) Between 1529 and 1550 eight Latin editions of the works of Cato, Varro, Columella and Palladius were published in Paris and Lyons. Palladius (1551) and Columella (1551, 1558) were also translated into French. The result was also a flood of publications on food and crops, and suggestions for the development of agriculture on a more rational basis. The basis for reform was laid by three Roman gentlemen-farmers and landowners Cato, Varro and Columella, who wrote about agriculture, and were also successful practical farmers. Their aim was to bring Roman farming on a higher level. The conjunction of these three didactic texts can be found from the Middle Ages. They were jointly published for the first time in 1472 in Venice, and form the chief texts on agriculture and rural life in antiquity. The oldest of the trio is the Roman politician Marcus Porcius Cato, 234-149 B.C., the source of famous maxims for orators, like rem tene, verba sequentur, and that an orator is A vir bonus dicendi peritus. 'He distinguished himself for fearless and ruthless attacks on those whose way of life did not agree with his own somewhat old-fashioned and puritanical morality'. (H.J. Rose, A Handbook of Latin Literature, London 1967, p. 91) In style and in character he was typical farmer, shrewd, hardworking, frugal, honest, sincere, but limited. His De re rustica, also known as De agri cultura is a kind of commonplace book. It gives us a view of the live of an oldfashioned landowner in that age, and offers information on Roman cult and rustic folklore. The second work was written by possibly the greatest scholar Rome produced, Marcus Terentius Varro, 116-27 B.C. Of the mass of works he wrote only one is preserved to us completely, De re rustica, and further more parts and fragments of some others. He was a landowner on a large scale, who wrote De re rustica in his eightieth year (annus octogesimus), he tells us in the beginning, ut sarcinas colligam ante quam profiscar e vita. It is a philosophic dialogue in 3 books, in which he gives sound and practical advice for managing a farm (I), a stock-ranch (II), poultry, aviary and herb-garden (III). 'While giving interesting information on the state of agriculture at that time, it is withal a pleasantly discursive book, the work of a garrulously entertaining old scholar' (H.J. Rose, A Handbook of Latin Literature, London 1967, p. 222) Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella was a contemporary of Seneca. He wrote his De re rustica, consisting of 12 books, ca. 60-65 A.D. He was a practical farmer on a large scale, who was concerned over the decline of the agriculture in his days. 'Book 1 deals with general matters of buildings and labour, 2 with soils and crops, 3-5 with vines, olives and fruittrees, 6-7 with domestic animals, 8 with poultry and fishponds, 9 with game and bees, 10 (in verse) with gardening, 11 with the bailiff's duties and the farmer's calendar, 12 with the bailiff's wife's duties'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 268) A separate book on arboriculture, part of a larger work, survives too. His style is straitforward and pleasant. The texts of this trio were edited by Piero Vettori, or Petrus Victorius, 1499-1585, the foremost representative of classical scholarship in Italy during the 16th century, which may well be called the Saeculum Victorianum. (J.E. Sandys, A history of classical scholarship, N.Y., 1964, p. 135) With his publication in 1541 begins for the Scriptores De re rustica, according to J.M. Gesner in his Biponti-edition of 1787, a new era, the Aetas Victoriana. Vettori, whom Fabricius/Ernsti calls the 'saviour' (sospitator) of the genre, concentrated himself with the help of old manuscripts, and his own wit, especially on Cato and Varro. Vettori produced for Gryphius in 1542 also a separate volume containing the justification of his emendations, which is often joined to the text edition. (Petri Victorii Explicatio suarum in Catonem, Varronem, Columellam castigationum separatim edita) In 1548/49 Gryphius brought a reissue of these editions of Vettori on the market, augmented with a volume with the text of De re rustica of the late antique agriculturalist with estates in Italy and Sardinia, Palladius, and a volume containing the commentary on these texts by the Italian scholars Georgius Merula (Alexandrinus) and Philippus Beroaldus. The set on offer contains the texts of the triumvirate Cato, Varro and Columella only, and is not accompanied by the supplementary volume of Palladius, and the commentary of Alexandrinus and Beroaldus. (A clear survey of the editions can be found in the Index Editionum in Gesner's Biponti-edition of 1787/88) The preface of Pietro Vettori to the first volume, dated Florence 1541, is dedicated to the cardinal Marcello Cervini, the future Pope Marcellus II. In it Vettori tells the reader that he not merely used already published texts, but that he collated for this edition old manuscripts, and that he also was to publish a volume with explanations of all the emendations he made with the help of the manuscripts. (praefatio p. 5) (Provenance: On the lower blank margin of the recto of leaf a-2 of the first volume a stamp of Dn. Jph Nicolas de Azara. Don José Nicolás de Azara, marquis de Nibbiano, 1730-1804, was besides a Spanish civil servant, diplomat and prominent representative of the Spanish Enlightenment, also a famous maecenas and art collector. He achieved international fame as ambassador in Rome, where he remained for more than 30 years, followed by a post in Paris from 1796 to 1803. In Italy Azara became close friends with Johann Joachim Winckelman, the printer Bodoni, and when in France with Napoleon and Talleyrand. But most of all De Azara is known for his friendschip with the German painter Anton Raphael Mengs, 1728-1779, a precursor to Neoclassical painting. Mengs painted the most famous portrait of Winckelmann, and also in the same style a delicate portrait of his patron Azara. This is considered to be one of his finest portraits. When in Rome Azara initiated an excavation project in Tivoli near Rome. After this he began to collect classical portraits and sculptures. By the end of his life he possessed some 70 magnificent masterpieces portraying Homer, Menander Miltiadis et alii. Azara's friendship with Napoleon, which arose from his diplomatic mission of 1796, is proved by a most royal gift to the Frenchman, the socalled 'Azara Herm', the iconic bust of Alexander, attributed to the Greek sculptor Lysippus, 4th century B.C., and now in the Louvre. Azara had unearthed the bust in 1779 at Tivoli, and presented it to Napoleon probably during his time as First Consul, i.e. not before 1803. On the verso of the title a small and old inscription: Scriptores Rei Rustic. Cato, Varro et Columella. Lugd. Gryphius, 1549 & 49, fr. 6) (Collation: a-p8 (leaf p8 blank); a-z8, A-I8 (minus the blank leaves I7 & I8)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120529 Euro 600,00
LIBRI DE RE RUSTICA. Methodus rustica Catonis atq. Varronis praeceptis aphoristicis per locos communes digestis a Theodoro Zvingero typice delineata & illustrata. Basel (Basileae), Petri Pernae opera atque impensa, n.d. (1567). 8vo. (XXIV),494,(2 blank),(22 index) p. Overlapping vellum 19 cm (Ref: VD16 C 1580; Schweiger 2,75) (Details: 2 thongs laced through the joints. Woodcut printer's mark on the title: a woman holding a oil lamp, motto: 'Verbum tuum lucerna pedibus meis'. (Psalm 119 verse 105) Occasional woodcut initials) (Condition: Vellum soiled and wrinkled. Small hole in the back and in the upper board. Front endpapers renewed in 19th century. 19th century annotations concerning Zwinger, Cato & Varro on the front pastedown and recto of the front flyleaf. Title slightly soiled. Small fold in right lower corner of the title. Small stain at the bottom of the title) (Note: Theodor Zwinger, 1533-1588, or Theodorus Zuingerus, also spelled as Zwingerus, or Zvingerus, was of humble descent. He studied philosophy in Paris under Petrus Ramus. Supported by the printer/bookdealer Perna he later went to Padua, where he studied medicin for 6 years. After his promotion in 1559 he returned to his hometown Basel, and was appointed professor of Greek and Moral philosophy. In 1580 he became also professor of Medicin. He is best known for his editions of the Nicomachean Ethics of the Greek philosopher Aristotle, which he published in 1566 & 1588. (Griechischer Geist aus Basler Pressen, no. 127 and 128) He produced also a kind of encyclopedia which was much admired in his time, 'Theatrum vitae humanae', Basel 1565. As a physician and logician he published his thoughts about the agricultural works of the Roman authors Cato (234-149 B.C.) and Varro (116-27 B.C). He tries to analyse their opinions, and show their structures in systematic tables, like he had previously done with Aristotle. At the end he publishes texts of Cato and Varro on agriculture, a fact that escaped many bibliographers. In vol. 1, p. CXXXIX of the Biponti edition of the 'Scriptores Rei Rusticae' edited by J.M. Gesner, 1671-1761, it is stated that the text of Cato follows the edition of P. Victorius (1543), and the text of Varro is that of J.J. Scaliger, 1565) (For Zwinger see ADB 45,543/4, where this title is omitted. It is however mentioned in Zedler 64,862/4) § Famine (with war and the plague) was a great problem in Italy, France, England and Germany during the first half of the 16th century. There were serious food shortages and outbreaks of disease in the 1520th and 1530th. This scourge reached its peak in the crisis of 1545/46 which was perhaps the most terrible year in the history of 16th century Paris. Many thousands died of hunger. This period is marked by a dramatic fall in living standards. The gravity of the situation began to be reflected in the medical and agricultural literature of that time: how to avoid disease and preserve health in times of dearth on a poor diet of gruel, bread, broth and beer. The French humanist schoolmaster Robert Breton, whose ideas were heavily coloured by classical influences, published in 1539 his Agriculturae encomium, in which he emphasized the need to combine theoretical and practical learning in agriculture. 'The food produced in the countryside, he pointed out, was absolutely essential to the existence of the towns and the state itself'. (H. Heller, Labour, science and technology in France, Cambr. 1996, p. 66) Food, especially grain, was not only scarce because of the ignorance and poverty of the peasantry, but also because of warfare. Towards the middle of this century the provision of an adequate food supply became urgent. 'Beyond assuring the subsistence of the population, it as critical to maintaining the momentum of the burgeoning manufacturing sector of the economy. Sustaining profit margins in industry depended on controling wages. Relatively low wages were only possible if the cost of grain (...) could be contained. As a result, one notes a growing preoccupation with agriculture among humanist authors'. (Op. cit. p. 65) Between 1529 and 1550 eight Latin editions of the works of Cato, Varro, Columella and Palladius were published in Paris and Lyons. The result was also a flood of publications on food and crops, and suggestions for the development of agriculture on a more rational basis. The basis for reform was laid by Roman gentlemen-farmers and landowners like Cato and Varro, who wrote about agriculture, and who were also successful practical farmers. Their aim was to bring Roman farming on a higher level Their works on agriculture are among the chief texts on agriculture and rural life in antiquity. The oldest is the Roman politician Marcus Porcius Cato, 234-149 B.C., the source of famous maxims for orators, like rem tene, verba sequentur, and that an orator is A vir bonus dicendi peritus. 'He distinguished himself for fearless and ruthless attacks on those whose way of life did not agree with his own somewhat old-fashioned and puritanical morality'. (H.J. Rose, A Handbook of Latin Literature, London 1967, p. 91) In style and in character he was a typical farmer, shrewd, hardworking, frugal, honest, sincere, but limited. His De re rustica, also known as De agri cultura is a kind of commonplace book. It gives us a view of the live of an oldfashioned landowner in that age, and offers information on Roman cult and rustic folklore. The second work was written by possibly the greatest scholar Rome produced, Marcus Terentius Varro, 116-27 B.C. Of the mass of works he wrote only one is preserved to us completely, De re rustica, and further more parts and fragments of some others. He was a landowner on a large scale, who wrote De re rustica in his eightieth year (annus octogesimus), he tells us in the beginning, ut sarcinas colligam ante quam profiscar e vita. It is a philosophic dialogue in 3 books, in which he gives sound and practical advice for managing a farm (I), a stock-ranch (II), poultry, aviary and herb-garden (III). 'While giving interesting information on the state of agriculture at that time, it is withal a pleasantly discursive book, the work of a garrulously entertaining old scholar' (H.J. Rose, A Handbook of Latin Literature, London 1967, p. 222) § The texts of Cato, Varro and Columella were edited by Piero Vettori, or Petrus Victorius, 1499-1585, the foremost representative of classical scholarship in Italy during the 16th century, which may well be called the Saeculum Victorianum. (J.E. Sandys, A history of classical scholarship, N.Y., 1964, p. 135) With his publication in 1541 begins for the Scriptores De re rustica, according to J.M. Gesner in his Biponti-edition of 1787, a new era, the Aetas Victoriana. Vettori, whom Fabricius/Ernsti calls the 'saviour' (sospitator) of the genre, concentrated himself with the help of old manuscripts, and his own wit, especially on Cato and Varro) (Collation: alfa8, beta4, a-z8 (leaves s7 and s8 blank), A-I8, K4 (minus leaf K4)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130040 Euro 660,00
LIBRI DE RE RUSTICA. Scriptores Rei Rusticae Veteres Latini. E recensione Jo. Matth. Gesneri cum ejusdem praef. et lexico rustico. Praemittitur notitia literaria. Studiis Societatis Bipontinae. Editio accurata. Zweibrücken (Biponti), Ex typographia Societatis, 1787 - 1788. 8vo. 4 volumes: (II),256,248; (II),566; (II),510; (II),369,(1 blank) p. Half vellum 22 cm (Ref: Not yet in VD18. Burkard p. 181/185; Schweiger 2,1307; Graesse 6/1,332; Ebert 20744) (Details: Nice set in 19th century half vellum. Backs gilt and with red morocco shields. Marbled boards. Engraved vignet on the first 3 titles) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled. Some wear to the extremes. Some foxing. Joints of the first volume beginning to split. Very small hole in title of the 4th volume, the 'Lexicon Rusticum'. A bookplate on the front pastedowns) (Note: Vol. 1 contains Cato's 'De agri cultura' and Varro's 'De re rustica libri III'; vol. 2 Columella's 'De re rustica' and 'De arboribus'; vol. 3 Palladius' 'De re rustica libri XIV', Vegetius Renatus' 'De artis Mulomedicinae libri IV', 'Gargilii Martialis fragmentum', and 'Ausonii Popmae de instrumento fundi liber'; vol. 4 the 'Lexicon rusticum'. § The Roman gentlemen-farmers and landowners Cato, Varro and Columella wrote about agriculture and were successful farmers too. Their aim was to bring Roman farming on a higher level. The conjunction of these three didactic texts can be found from the Middle Ages. They were jointly published for the first time in 1472 in Venice, and form the chief texts on agriculture and rural life in antiquity. The oldest of the trio is the Roman politician Marcus Porcius Cato, 234-149 B.C., the source of famous maxims for orators, like 'rem tene, verba sequentur'. 'He distinguished himself for fearless and ruthless attacks on those whose way of life did not agree with his own somewhat old-fashioned and puritanical morality'. (H.J. Rose, 'A Handbook of Latin Literature', London 1967, p. 91) In style and in character he was a typical farmer, shrewd, hardworking, frugal, honest, sincere, but limited. His 'De agri cultura', also known as 'De re rustica' is a kind of commonplace book. It gives us a view of the live of an oldfashioned landowner in that age, and offers information on Roman cult and rustic folklore'. § The second work was written by possibly the greatest scholar Rome produced, Marcus Terentius Varro, 116-27 B.C. Of the mass of works he wrote only one is preserved to us completely, 'De re rustica libri III', and further more there are parts and fragments of some other works. He was a landowner on a large scale, who wrote 'De re rustica' in his eightieth year (annus octogesimus), he tells us in the beginning, 'ut sarcinas colligam ante quam profiscar e vita'. It is a philosophic dialogue in 3 books, in which he gives sound and practical advice for managing a farm (I), a stock-ranch (II), poultry, aviary and herb-garden (III). 'While giving interesting information on the state of agriculture at that time, it is withal a pleasantly discursive book, the work of a garrulously entertaining old scholar' (Idem, p. 222) § Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella was a contemporary of Seneca. He wrote his 'De re rustica', consisting of 12 books, ca. 60-65 A.D. He was also a practical farmer on a large scale who was concerned over the decline of the agriculture in his days. 'Book 1 deals with general matters of buildings and labour, 2 with soils and crops, 3-5 with vines, olives and fruittrees, 6-7 with domestic animals, 8 with poultry and fishponds, 9 with game and bees, 10 (in verse) with gardening, 11 with the bailiff's duties and the farmer's calendar, 12 with the bailiff's wife's duties'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 268) A separate book on arboriculture, part of a larger work, survives too. His style is straitforward and pleasant. The texts of this trio were edited by Piero Vettori, or Petrus Victorius, 1499-1585. With his edition of 1541 begins for the 'Scriptores de re rustica', according to the 18th century German scholar J.M. Gesner a new era, the 'Aetas Victoriana'. Gesner based his own edition of the 'Scriptores rei rusticae veteres latini' of Leipzig 1735 on the work of Vettori. He slightly revised Vettori's text with the help of some manuscripts and earlier edtions. This 'Scriptores rei rusticae veteres latini' edition of 1787 is a reissue of that edition of Leipzig 1735. The 'notitia literaria' is brought up to date, and added are a translation of the life of Cato by Plutarch, and the 'Varro-Vita' by M. Hanke of Leipzig 1669. Gesner adopted next to the triumvirate Cato, Varro and Columella in his 1735 edition 'De re rustica' of the late antique agriculturalist with estates in Italy and Sardinia, Palladius) (Provenance: Modern bookplate: 'Ex libris Georges Raepsaet', a Belgian ancient historian and archaeologist) (Collation: 1: pi1, a-i8, k4, l2; A-P8, Q4. 2: pi1, a-2M8, 2N4 (minus blank leaf 2N4). 3: pi1,A-2H8, 2I8 (minus blank leaf 2I8). 4: A-2F8, 2G2 (minus blank leaf 2G2, leaf 2G1 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130154 Euro 375,00
LIVIUS. De Roomsche historie oft gesten, door den alder welsprekensten ende vernaemsten Histori-schrijver Titum Livium beschreven. Waer uut niet alleen alle wereltlijcke staten tot vromicheyt ende ridderlijcke manlijcke feyten beweecht ende ghedronghen, maar oock alle ander staten tot grooter recreatien ende gheneuchten des herten ghetrocken sullen worden. Leiden, By Ian Paedts Iacobszoon ende Ian Bouwenszoon, 1585. Folio. 4 parts in one vol: (XII),301 leaves. Full restored calf over wooden boards. 30 cm (Ref: Geerebaert CXV,1,a; cf. OiN 242) (Details: Binding skillfully restored in contemporary style, preserving the original leather almost completely; back with 5 raised bands; blind stamped boards, decorated with 3 rolls, the largest one comprising portraits of biblical figures like Urias and Achab, and the others with geometrical and floral motives; 4 title pages, each with the same big woodcut ornamental printer's mark, depicting the fight between David and Goliath; the mottto reads: 'Hy heeft gewelt gedaen doer zynen arm en de hoveerdige in haers herten gedachten verstroit'; woodcut inititials, text printed in 2 colums in Gothic type) (Condition: Cover scratched; the leather on the back shows crackles; the clasps and catches are gone, but their traces have been restored very neatly; new endpapers; first title soiled, its corners renewed by infilling; small and old inscription on the title; wee inventory number written in red ink near the upper edge; a few small ruststains and inkstains, and some faint notes in ink; a small and unobstrusive rusthole in the left lower corner of the first 7 leaves; the tips of 3 corners torn off, without ever reaching any text) (Note: The Roman historian Titus Livius, 59 B.C. - 17 A.D, wrote a huge, and immensely influential history of Rome 'From the foundation of the City' (Ab Urbe Condita libri) in 142 books. Of this work only 35 books are still extant. Of the rest remain only fragments and summaries. He 'set himself to give Rome a history that in conception and style should be worthy of her imperial rise and greatness' (OCD 2nd ed. p. 615). The later Roman historian Tacitus declared that Livy was 'brilliant for eloquence and credibility' (Annales 4.43). Livy was the source and model of a many classical, medieval and later historians and writers, like Lucan for his 'Civil War', for Einhard's biography of Charlemagne, for Petrarch's 'Africa', for Shakespeare's 'Rape of Lucretia' etc. etc. Other humanist historians wrote the history of their state to equal what Livy had done for Rome. The English philosopher 'Francis Bacon declared Livy the best historian, who provided models for behavior (Advancement of Learning, 1605).' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 537) § This Dutch translation of 1585 was first published in Antwerp in 1541. It was the first translation into Dutch of Livy, no translator was mentioned. The 1585 edition repeats the preface of the publisher Jan Gymnick of the 1541 edition. In this preface, and even in the title, the opinion of Francis Bacon is foreshadowed. On the title it is declared that the elite of society, while reading Livy, can learn piety, and gallant and manly behavior. In the preface Jan Gymnick elaborates on this, e.g. 'Hoe wijselijck Scipio zijn beginsel aen ghestelt heeft, hoe mannelijck ende ridderlijck hy dat volbrocht heeft, dat dient eenen yeghelijcken die hem in mannelijcken ende ridderlijcken oft wereldlijcken saken oeffenen sal ende moet'. By some it was believed that Jan Gymnick was the translator of Livy. J.F. Vanderheyden explains in his 'De Livius-vertaling van 1541', Gent, 1959, that this was based on a misunderstanding, because the Leiden publisher of the 1585 edition altered the dedication to the city council of Antwerp at the beginning of the preface into a salute of the 'translator' to his readers, 'Den Oversetter wenscht den goetwillighen leser gheluck ende voorspoet', whereas Jan Gymnick declares in the 1541 edition that he commissioned a faithful translation. So he did not translate Livy himself. Vanderheyden proves in his monography, by comparing texts, that the anonymous translation published by Gymnick was only a sloppy adaptation of one of more previously publised German translations. However on some places the Dutch translator seems to have used the original Latin text. Who the translator, or adaptor was, we cannot say. (A review of Vanderheyden in 'Tijdschrift voor Nederlandse Taal- en Letterkunde, jaargang 78, p. 77/79') (Collation: * -2*6, A-3C6 3D8 (minus leaf 3D8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 115763 Euro 1200,00
LIVIUS. Romainsche Historien van Titus Livius, sedert de bouwing van Romen tot aan d'ondergang van 't Macedonische Rijk. Ten meestendeel van nieus vertaalt, en met een tweede decade, voor de gene, die verloren is, verrijkt, en op ontellijke plaatsen vermeerdert. Met een vervolg der Romainsche historien, strekkende van 't einde van T. Livius tot aan de doot van C. Iulius Caesar; beneffens een kort, doch bondig Vertoog van de Staat der oude Romainen. Nieuwelijks uit de Romainsche Historie van M. Scipio Dupleix vertaalt, en met nieuwe Bladwyzers verrijkt. Amsterdam (t' Amsterdam), Gedrukt by Jacob Lescaille voor Ian Iacobsz. Schipper, 1646. Folio. (LII, including frontispiece),622 (recte 620), (38 index) (2 blank); 198 (recte 194), (26) p. Vellum 31.5 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 115,3; OiN 242; Schweiger 2,548) (Details: Back with 7 raised bands; brown morocco shield in second compartment; both covers blind tooled; blind stamped oval ornament in the center of both boards; the frontispiece depicts Jupiter, sitting on a flying eagle, and brandishing his thunderbolt; Jupiter is accompanied by Hera, Iris and 2 warriors; Iris holds a caduceus in her hand; in the foreground rests near a well Tiburinus, the personification and genius of the river Tiber; at his feet are playing Romulus and Remus, who he is told to have found on the border of his river, and the she-wolf Lupa. Woodcut ornament on the title; woodcut initials; numerous charming woodcuts in the text; printed in 2 columns, and in Gothic type) (Condition: Vellum age tanned and slightly spotted; some soiling of the frontispiece; some small spots on the title) (Note: The Roman historian Titus Livius, 59 B.C. - 17 A.D, wrote a huge, and immensely influential history of Rome, 'From the foundation of the City' (Ab Urbe Condita libri) in 142 books. Of this work only 35 books are still extant. Of the rest remain only fragments and summaries. He 'set himself to give Rome a history that in conception and style should be worthy of her imperial rise and greatness' (OCD 2nd ed. p. 615). The later Roman historian Tacitus declared that Livy was 'brilliant for eloquence and credibility'. (Annales 4.43) Livy was the source and model of many classical, medieval and later historians and writers, like Lucan for his 'Civil War', for Einhard's biography of Charlemagne, for Petrarch's 'Africa', for Shakespeare's 'Rape of Lucretia' etc. Other humanist historians wrote the history of their state to equal what Livy had done for Rome. The English philosopher 'Francis Bacon declared Livy the best historian, who provided models for behavior (Advancement of Learning, 1605)' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 537) § Jan Hendriksz. Glazemaker, 1619/20-1682, was a professional translator and glazier. (Glazemaker means glazier) If there were no texts to translate, Glazemaker worked as a glazier in the firm of his stepfather. He started his career translating popular literature, later he specialized in philosophy. He translated e.g. Descartes and Spinoza for the Dutch market. He mainly translated from Latin and French. His knowledge of Greek seems to have been insufficient to translate properly. So he must have used also Latin and French examples for his Greek authors. Choosing words to translate he was a purist, and always chose pure Dutch terms, so enriching the Dutch vocabulary. He was not a scholar, nor a humanist virtuoso. To make some money he had to translate a lot, and fast. His hastiness was the cause of some sloppiness. 'In vertalingen uit het Latijn valt op dat Glazemaker nogal eens mistast bij pronominale verwijzingen. Ook moet men niet veel precisie verwachten bij zijn vertaling van tempus, modus en genus van werkwoordsvormen. Kleine woordjes als adverbia, partikels, coniuncties worden op de gis vertaald of weggelaten. (...) Meestal is zijn globale tekstbegrip zo groot dat geen verduistering van de strekking het gevolg is'. Glazemaker's style seems unvarying. He aims at keeping the structure of the sentences as clear and simple as possible, which is said to be benificial to the reading pleasure, and to be good for global and rational clarity. (Glazemaker, 1682-1982, Catalogus bij een tentoonstelling over de vertaler Jan Hendriksz. Glazemaker, Amst., 1982, p. IX-XIII) § The translation is preceded by a 44 p. richly illustrated survey of the buildings of Rome, and of Roman customs and traditions. After the translation of the first ten books of Livy's 'Ab Urbe Condita' Glazemaker has added, as replacement of the lost second decade (which cover 293-218 B.C.) a translation of the relevant part of the historical work of the French historian Scipion Dupleix (1569-1661). (S. Dupleix, 'Histoire Romaine depuis la fondation de Rome', 3 volumes, Paris, 1638-1643) At the end of Livy's work, after p. 622, Glazemaker has added as continuation again a considerable part of Dupleix' work. This part runs from from 167 B.C., when Livy ends, till the death of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C. The continuation starts on page 170 (chapitre 9, livre 20) in volume two of Dupleix' 'Histoire Romaine'. As a replacement of the the lost second decade Glazemaker offers his translation of the p. 643-717 (chapitre 5, livre 12 - livre XIII) of Dupleix' historical work. Glazemaker is not mentioned on the title. His name however occurs on the title page preceding the continuation of Dupleix. As the writer of the preface (Aan de lezer) tells the reader that he supplements lost parts of Livy with Dupleix, he cannot be any other than Glazemaker. ('Doch wy hebben echter, om dit werk tot enige volmaaktheit te brengen, 't geen, dat ons dienstigh was, uit de Romainsche Historie van M. Scipio Dupleix getrokken, te weten dat, 't welk wy hier, in plaats van T. Livius tweede Decade, die door de ramp des tijts verloren is, ingevoegt hebben, en voorts het vervolg op onze schrijver, dat is van d'ondergang van 't Macedonische rijk, tot aan de doot van C. Julius Cesar, door de voorgenoemde Dupleix'. p. *4 recto) (Collation: *4, *- 4*4, 5*6; A - Z6, Aa - Zz6, Aaa - Eee6, Fff - Lll4 (leaf Lll4 blank); A - H6; Aa - Ii6, Kk - Ll4. Irregular pagination in the first part between p. 404 & 407; irregular pagination in the second part between p. 96 and 101) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151901 Euro 820,00
LONGINUS. DIONUSIOU LOGGINOU PERI HUPSOUS kai t'alla HEURISKOMENA. Dionysii Longini De Sublimitate commentarius, ceteraque, quae reperiri potuere, in usum Principis Electoralis Brandenburgici, Jacobus Tollius e quinque codicibus MSS emendavit, & Fr. Robertelli, Fr. Porti, Gabrielis de Petra, Ger. Langbaenii, & Tanaquilli Fabri notis integris suas subjecit, novamque versionem suam Latinam & Gallicam Boilavii, cum ejusdem, ac Dacierii, suisque notis Gallicis addidit. Utrecht (Trajecti ad Rhenum), Ex Officina Francisci Halma, 1694. 4to. (XXVIII, including a frontispiece), 408,(12, index) p. Vellum 25 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,526; Dibdin 2,176/7; D. St. Marin 38) (Details: Short title in ink on the back; 6 thongs laced through covers; frontispiece by J. Goeree and J. Baptist depicting philosophers/scholars debating in a temple, in the background a mausoleum. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, motto: 'vivitur in genio', 'only through his genius man survives. Wide margins) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled; some slight foxing; small & old name on the title) (Note: The literary treatise 'On the sublime' (Peri Hupsous) of which 2/3 survives, is ascribed by the medieval tradition to Dionysius Longinus, it was written some time in the first century A.D. 'As a stimulus to critical thought and to the understanding of ancient literature he (the author) has permanent value'. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 619). Dibdin is full of praise for this edition by Tollius: 'the merits of this elegant edition are well known. Fabricius, Harles and Weiske have given it every praise. (...) This edition, says Mr. Gibbon, is a very copious and complete one. Tollius, although a commentator, was a man of taste and genius'. The work contains the notes of Robertellus, Portus and others, with the French translation of Boileau which made Longinus popular all over Europe, and with the notes of Dacier and Tollius. The Dutch scholar Jacobus Tollius, 1633-1696, was the first to collect the fragments of Longinus. At first he was the secretary of the famous classicist Nicolaas Heinsius. Later he became professor at the university of Duisburg. Tollius labours were not in vain. St. Marin cites De Tipaldo: 'Tollius' labours were happily crowned with success, for his edition had a magnificent reception') (Provenance: Right of printer's mark 'Gerdii' (?) (Collation: *-3*4, 4*2; A-3F4, 3G2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140094 Euro 280,00
LONGINUS. DIONUSIOU LONGINOU PERI HUPSOUS HUPOMNÊMA. Dionysii Longini De Sublimitate commentarius, quem nova versione donavit, notis illustravit, & partim manuscriptorum ope, partim conjectura emendavit (additis etiam omnibus ejusdem auctoris fragmentis) Zacharias Pearce, A.M., Regiae Majestati a Sacris Domesticis etc. Editio secunda, notis & emendationibus auctior. London (Londini), Ex officina Jacobi Tonson & Joannis Watts, 1732. 8vo. XXXV,(I errata),301,(3 variae lectiones),(19 index),(1 blank) p. Calf. 20 cm (Ref: ESTC Citation No. T87458; Hoffmann 2,527: 'Pearce hat in dieser Ausg. viel verbessert'; D. St.Marin no. 44: 'a fine critical edition'; Dibdin 2,177/8: 'Bishop Pearce is rightly called by Harles, 'Longini Sospicator'; Brunet 3,1152: 'Cette édition a été revue par l'éditeur qui y a ajouté de nouvelles notes, et c'est d'après ce texte qu'ont été faites les réimpressions de Londres, 1743, 1753, 1773'; Graesse 4,252; Ebert 12211) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands & with gilt lettered brown morocco label in second compartment. Old paper shelfmark label at the foot. Boards with bouble fillet blindstamped borders, in which a double fillet rectangel with corner pieces, in which another smaller double fillet rectangel of a darker hue leather, which is surrounded by a blindstamped roll of floral motives. Title in red & black. Engraved frontispiece: an orator and his audience in a library. Woodcut initials and headpieces. An engraved headpiece with the coat of arms Thomas Parker, Earl of Macclesfield, Viscount of Ewelme, and Baron of Macclesfield, at the beginning of the dedicatio. Paper of excellent quality. § Parallel Greek and Latin texts; all the notes are conveniently printed under the text) (Condition: Some slight scratching on the boards. Front hinge showing a tendency to start splitting. Some old ink annotations on the front pastedown. Quotation from Pope's 'Essay on Criticism' in old ink on the rear pastedown) (Note: The literary treatise 'On the sublime' (Peri Hupsous), of which 2/3 survives, and is ascribed by the medieval tradition to Dionysius Longinus, was written some time in the first century A.D. 'As a stimulus to critical thought and to the understanding of ancient literature he (the author) has permanent value'. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 619). 'Longinus was ably edited by Zachary Pearce, (1690-1774), Fellow of Trinity, and ultimately bishop of Rochester'. (Sandys II,412). It was a new recension and had a new translation, and was published in London in 1724. Pearce revised the text for this second edition and added new notes. Of this second edition reissues have been published in London, in 1743, 1753 and 1773. St.Marin no. 44: 'This scholar's work turned out to be a fine critical edition, and was especially valued for the variants which it offers'. This octavo edition 'was published for the sake of general circulation', and has 'propagated universally the critical talents and fine taste of their editor'. (Dibdin)) (Provenance: In ink on the front pastedown: 'E libris Capel Berrow e Coll. St Joh. Bapt. Oxon., 1736' This is the English divine Capel Berrow, 1716-1782. He matriculated a commoner of St. John's College at Oxford in 1734, proceeded B.A. 1738, and M.A. of Christ's College, Cambridge, 1758. He became curate of St. Botolph's, Aldersgate (1741), and afterwards of St. Austin's, and in 1744 was chosen lecturer of St Benedict's, Paul's Wharf. In 1766 Capel Barrow was rector of Rossington, Northamptonshire. His 'A Lapse of Human Souls in a State of Pre-existence, the only Original Sin and the Ground Work of the Gospel Dispensation', published in 1766, is his only book now remembered. (See his Wikipedia article)) (Collation: A8, a8, b2; B-X8, Y2 (leaf Y2 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130247 Euro 370,00
LONGINUS. Dionysii Longini quae supersunt graece et latine. Recensuit notas suas atque animadversiones adjecit Joannes Toupius. Accedunt emendationes Davidis Ruhnkenii. Oxford (Oxonii), e typographeo Clarendoniano, 1778. 4to. (VIII),26,(2);254,(6) p. Full contemporary calf. 28,5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann II, 527: 'Der Herausg. benutzte die Ausg. des Robertellus u. Manutius, den Commentar des Partus, den Codex Eliensis, nebst den Varr., u. 2 Pariser Handschr'; Dibdin 2,179: 'This is the celebrated edition of Longinus by Mr. Toup, one of the most excellent scholars this country produced'; D. St. Marin 57: 'a truly magnificent edition'.) (Details: Ample margins) (Condition: Cover scratched & scuffed; joint splitting, but still strong; head & tail of spine chafed; corners bumped; 2 bookplates on front pastedown; first leaves slightly foxed) (Note: The literary treatise 'On the sublime' (Peri Hupsous) of which 2/3 survives, is ascribed by the medieval tradition to Dionysius Longinus. It was written some time in the first century A.D. 'As a stimulus to critical thought and to the understanding of ancient literature he (the author) has permanent value'. (OCD, 2nd ed. p. 619). Jonathan Toup, 1713-1785, was a pupil of Bentley. He is 'best known for his edition of Longinus'; (DBC 3,797). He embodied in it the enlarged commentaries of Portus, 'and the learned and admirable treatise of Ruhnkenius', (Dibdin). DBC 3,979: 'The Latin translation under the Greek text, is of Z. Pearce'. 'Throughout the whole work there is so much erudition and excellent criticism on the original displayed, and it is likewise so elegantly printed, that it may be recommended as one of the most admirable editions of a classical author as any country has yet produced'. (Didbin). The text & Latin translation are preceded by a 'Dissertatio philologica de vita et scriptis Longini auctore P.J. Schardam', according to St. Marin an alias of Ruhnken himself. Useful notes of Ruhnkenius are added on p. 133-152, those of Toup are on p. 152-254. It is said that this edition inspired the young Richard Porson to pursue his own celebrated career in Greek studies. (DBC 3,979) (Provenance: two bookplates on the front pastedown. One with the coat of arms of the banker and politician Raikes Currie, 1801-1881. The other exlibris of more recent date is of one Laurentius (Lawrence) (Collation: pi2, +2, a-g2, A-3T2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 090514 Euro 150,00
LUCANUS. M. Annaei Lucani Pharsalia cum commentario Petri Burmanni. Leiden (Leidae), Apud Conradum Wishoff, Danielem Goetval et Georg. Jacob. Wishoff, fil.Conrad., 1740. 4to. (LII),735,(1 blank) (160 indices) p. Marbled calf. 26 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,565; Dibdin 2,186; Spoelder p. 642/3, Middelburg 4) (Details: Prize copy; backstrip ruled in gilt; red morocco shield on the back; gilt coat of arms of Middelburg on both covers; gilt palmette motifs along the borders of both covers. Title in red and black. Large engraving of a battle scene, the battle of Actium, on the title, designed by J. de Groot, and engraved by J. v.d. Spyk) (Condition: The back is expertly repaired; prize removed; bookplate on front flyleaf; edges of front flyleaf chipping; some foxing) (Note: This edition of Petrus Burmannus, 1668-1741, professor of Latin at the University of Utrecht since 1696, and at Leiden since 1715, is highly praised by Dibdin. He remarks that this is a valuable edition. It is sometimes preferred to the edition of Oudendorp, 1728, he says. The text of Burman's edition is founded on that of Cortius. As an editor Burman was an industrious manufacturer of Variorum Editions. He confined himself to the Latin classics, and edited Phaedrus, Horace, Claudian, Ovid, Lucan, and the Poetae Latini Minores, Petronius, Quintilian and Suetonius. (Sandys 2 p. 343/5) The genius Housman is more critical in the praefatio of his edition of Lucan. 'An edition of much less value than either of the foregoing (Oudendorp of 1728, Cortius of 1726) was put forth in 1740 near the end of his long life, by the elder Burman. The notes are desultory, diffuse and often trivial, .. But his familiarity with Latin poets was great, ... so that he resolved some difficulties which had baffled others, and achieved at v 137 one most admirable emendation' (Housman, Lucanus 1926, p. XXXII) (Provenance: bookplate of Helena Heyse. Helena Elizabeth Zoraide Heyse was born on the 12th of June in the Dutch town of Middelburg. In 1931 she married P.E. Scholtz, professor of Afrikaans & Netherlands at the University of Cape Town) (Collation: *-6*4, 7*2, A-6V4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 059992 Euro 325,00
LUCIANUS. LOUKIANOU SAMOSATEÔS HAPANTA. Luciani Samostatenis Opera. Ex versione Ioannis Benedicti. Cum notis integris Ioannis Bourdelotii, Iacobi Palmerii a Grentemesnil, Tanaquilli Fabri, Aegidii Menagii, Francisci Guieti, Ioannis Georgii Graevii, Iacobi Gronovii, Lamberti Barlaei, Iacobi Tollii & selectis aliorum. Accedunt inedita scholia in Lucianum, ex Bibliotheca Isaaci Vossii. (At the end: Scholia in volumen primum (& secundum) Luciani. Nunquam hactenus edita. Recensuit & notulas adjecit Johannes Clericus) Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Ex Typographia P. &. I. Blaeu, Prostant apud Wolfgang, Ianssonio-Waesbergios, Boom, a Someren, & Goethals, 1687. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XXIV),1060,(19 index); (IV),922,(26 index); (VIII),46;55 p., engraved frontispiece. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,537; Dibdin 2,193; Moss 2,262/3; Brunet 3,1207; Graesse 4,278; Ebert 12384) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints. Engraved frontispiece: Lucian seated at his desk, surrounded by scenes from his writings. Woodcut printer's mark on both titles, depicting a celestial sphere, flanked by Hermes and Chronus, the motto is 'Indefessus agendo'. Woodcut initials. 1 woodcut engraving. Greek text with facing Latin translation) (Condition: vellum slightly soiled. Old paper shelf number at the foot of the spines) (Note: This is a typical Variorum edition. It offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. This edition was produced by Johann George Greffe, or Graeve, better known as Johannes Georgius Graevius, (1632-1703), who was of German origin. He went to the Dutch republic to study classics. He later was appointed professor at Duisburg, then at Deventer, and finally at Utrecht, where he was the last 42 years of his life a star of the first order which adorned its University. He limited his attention almost mainly to Latin prose. This Variorum edition of Lucianus edited by Graevius seems to have escaped the attention of Sandys. Hoffmann & Brunet erroneously state that Johannes Clericus is the editor. Johannes Georgius Graevius himself however tells the reader in a 'Lectori' on p. (XVII) of vol. 1 about his modus operandi producing this edition. He tells his readers that he produced this new edition of Lucian on request of the publishing firm of Blaeu. Graevius consulted the work of the best preceding editors and commentators, like Bourdelotius, Palmerius, Faber and others, including the not yet published notes of scholars like Menagius, and Jacob Gronovius which they had sent to him. Graevius says he also used the editio princeps of 1496, the Aldus edition of 1503, and the Basel editions of 1555 & 1563 etc. For the Greek text and Latin translation Graevius follows the edition of Johannes Benedictus of 1619. At the end of the second volume have been added 54 & 55 p. with not yet published scholia. Graevius tells the reader that these scholia, which were part of the manuscript collection of the Dutch classical scholar Isaac Vossius, arrived just after the printing had been completed. These scholia have been edited by the Dutch scholar of Swiss origin Johannes Clericus, 1657-1736. Clericus himself explains in his 'Bibliothèque Choisie' vol. 16, p. 400/1, that he certainly didnot produce this edition of Lucianus, but that he only edited the scholia. There he also sneers at Graevius, and complains about the mediocre quality of the scholia, and tells that Vossius sold the printer a bad copy of the scholia for too high a price. (See Moss 1,263) Dibdin: 'Dr. Harwood calls it (this editon of 1687) 'a tolerably correct edition, and greatly superior to all that preceded it') (Provenance: From the library of Andrew Fletcher of Saltoun, 1653-1716, a Scottish author and politician. He was leading the opposition against the 1707 Act of Union between Scotland and England. He also was an passionate book collector. A very fine set, with the manuscript entry of Fletcher on the pastedown of both backcovers) (Collation: *8, 2*4, A-3X8 3Y4 (leaf 3Y4 blank); *2, A-3N8 3O2; *4, a-f4 (leaf f4 blank); a-g4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130406 Euro 925,00
LUCRETIUS. Titi Lucretii Cari De rerum natura libri sex. Accedunt selectae lectiones dilucidando poëmati appositae. (Curante Stephano Andrea Philippe). Paris, (Lutetiae Parisiorum), Typis Josephi Barbou, 1754. 12mo. XXXVI,288 p., frontispiece and 6 plates. Later half morocco. 17.5 cm (Ref: Gordon 504B; Ebert 12455; Brunet 3,1220; cf. Schweiger 2,576 for the ed. of 1744; Graesse 4,280) (Details: Nice copy. Red morocco, first half 20th century. Back with 4 raised bands, with gilt fillets and lettering. Marbled boards and endpapers. Thick paper, wide margins, untrimmed. Fine engraved frontispiece and plates of Frans van Mieris, engraved by Cl. Duflos for Coustelier in 1744, and used again by Barbou for this edition. For an explanation of these mythological plates see the bibliography of Gordon, p. 244. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting an old man who stands in the shade of a vine-entwined elmtree, symbolising the symbiotic relationship between scholar and publisher. The motto is enigmatic: 'Non solus', probably indicating the interdependency of publisher and scholar. Occasional engraved headpieces and woodcut initials. Includes also a tricolour bookmarker. At the end 30 pages filled with 'Variae Lectiones') (Condition: Some negligible wear to the corners; a hardly visible dent at the lower edge of the front board) (Note: The Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius was much admired in the age of Enlightenment. 'Virtually every major figure of the period was in some way influenced by Lucretius'. (S. Gillespie and Ph. Hardie, Cambridge Companion to Lucretius, 2007, p. 274). He acted as shield-bearer and mouthpiece of the Greek philosopher Epicurus by explaining in his didactic poem 'De rerum natura' Epicurus' physical theories 'with a view to abolishing superstitious fears of the intervention of the gods in the world and of the punishment of the soul in an after-life'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 623). § This is a line for line re-edition of the Lucretius edition of 1744, published in Paris by A. Coustelier. It was edited by the French scholar Étienne André Philippe de Prétot, 1707-1787. He taught history and geography at the Royal Academy in Paris, and produced for the publisher Coustelier a great number of editions of Latin classics, especially poets and historians. He published also on Roman history, and on geography. He was not an accomplished philologist, so he borrowed the texts for his editions from standard works. In this case he used the text of the edition of the Dutch classical scholar S. Haverkamp, 1684-1742, which was published in quarto, Leiden 1725. Dibdin calls the edition of Haverkamp 'not only a very splendid, but a learned and critical edition'. (Dibdin 2,202/3). Ernesti calls it 'splendissima' (Ernesti, 1,83). Mr. Philippe not only borrowed the text, but his edition is also adorned with the same charming plates as that of Haverkamp, only expertly reduced) (Collation: frontispiece, a8, b4, c6; plate, A8, B4, C8, plate, D4, E8, F4, G8 (plate after G5), H4, I8, K4, L8 (plate after L1), M4, N8, O4, Plate, P8, Q4, R8, S4, T8 (plate after T1), V4, X8, Y4, Z8, Aa4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120272 Euro 350,00
LYCOPHRON. Lycophronis Chalcidensis Alexandra. Poëma obscurum. Ioannes Meursius recensuit, & libro commentario illustravit. Altera editio aucta & innovata. Accessit Iosephi Scaligeri Iulii Caes. F. versio centum locis emendatior. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Ludovici Elzevirii. 1599. 8vo. (XVI),350,(18 index) p. Calf (19th century) 16 cm (Ref: Willems 39; Rahir 25; Berghman 835; Hoffmann 2,569; cf. Smitskamp, The Scaliger collection, no.93 for the first edition of 1597; Brunet 3,1247-1248; Ebert 12543; Graesse 4,309) (Details: Back elaborately gilt with four ornamental lozenges; brown lettering label; the covers are tooled with a triple gilt fillet border, cover edges gilt; edges of the paper marbled, marbled endpapers. The colophon on the last page reads: 'Lugduni Batavorum. Excudebat Ioannes Balduini. VIII. Kal. Maias. anno 1599') (Condition: Nice copy, some slight wear to the extremities, just a bit of rubbing to the joints. Some small, old ink marginalia. Last quire slightly browning, otherwise clean and fresh) (Note: Lycophron, 3rd cent. BC, was called to Alexandria in Egypt by King Ptolemaeus Philadelphos. There this tragedian wrote his Alexandra (or Kassandra), ca. 1474 iambic trimeters, in which Kassandra tells about the fall of Troy, and the fates of the Greek and Trojan Heroes. It is his only surviving work, which is full of the extreme and designed obscurity that the Alexandrians, who were fond of a style full of learned allusions and playful riddles, loved. Rose calls the Alexandra a monstruous riddle. 'In form it is the speech of a messenger, a servant of Priam, (...), coming to tell his master that Kassandra (= Alexandra) has just delivered a mysterious oracle. (...) The prophecy concerns the whole history of Troy, the Trojans and their descendants, together with the fates of the Greeks for many generations to come, and from beginning to end it calls nothing and no one by any wellknown name, personal or geographical'. (H.J. Rose, A handbook of Greek literature', London 1964, p. 336). For instance, Lycophron calls the mythical hero Heracles the 'Lion of the triple evening', expecting the reader to know that Heracles, when he was begotten, the night was thrice its normal length. This edition of 1599 is a revised and improved second edition. The first edition was produced two years earlier, in 1597, by the then 18 years old Dutchman Joannes Meursius, or in Dutch 'Jan de Meurs', 1579-1639. He was a student of the genius Joseph Justus Scaliger, born in 1540, who lectured since 1593 in Leiden till his death in 1609. Scaliger helped and encouraged his pupil in the production of this edition. In the preface Meursius tells us that he wouldnot have dared to edit such a dark and difficult text without the help of Scaliger. Scaliger helped him with the commentary and gave him permission to reprint his verse translation, with corrections. This metrical and smooth Latin translation had been published previously in Basel in 1566. The last 251 pages of the book contain the commentary of Meursius, 'quod sine interprete vix est ut quisquam intellegat'. (preface, leaf A8 recto) Meursius was later appointed professor of History, and of Greek (1610/13) at his own university. He is best known for his editions of byzantine authors, and for the books he wrote on the history of ancient Greece, for example on festivals, Eleusis, and the antiquities of Athens and Attica. His work was widely used as source by later ancient historians. (Sandys 2,310/11)) (Collation: A-Z8 a8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152319 Euro 1250,00
LYCOPHRON. (First title:) LUKOPHRONOS TOU CHALKIDEÔS ALEXANDRA, to skoteinon poiêma, kai eis auto touto ISAAKIOU, mallon de IÔANNOU, tou TZETZOU EXÊGEMA. (Second title:) Lycophronis Chalcidensis Alexandra, obscurum poema. Cum graeco Isaacii, seu potius Johannis Tzetzae commentario. Versiones, variantes lectiones, emendationes, adnotationes, & indices necessarios adjecit Johannes Potterus, A.M. & Collegii Lincolniensis Socius. Editio secunda, priori auctior. Oxford (Oxonii), E Theatro Sheldoniano, impensis Joannis Oweni, 1702. Folio. (XVIII, including a frontispiece & a title in Greek):183,(28),(2),(4),174,(17),(1 blank) p. Vellum 33 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,569; Dibdin 2,209/210; Brunet 3,1248; Sandys 2,356) (Details: 8 thongs laced through the joints. Red morocco shield on the back. Frontispiece depicting Alexandra who points at Troy in fire in the background, an engraving of 'M. Burghers sculp. Univ. Oxon.' Burghers was one of the leading engravers of England during that period; the book has 2 titles, the first one is in Greek, and is adorned with an big engraving of the Sheldonian Theatre, also made by Burghers. The second title is in Latin, and has a woodcut printer's mark, which shows the wellknown coat of arms of the University of Oxford) (Condition: Vellum soiled) (Note: Lycophron, 3rd cent. BC, was called to Alexandria by King Ptolemaeus Philadelphos. There he wrote his Alexandra (or Cassandra), ca. 1474 iambic trimeters in which Kassandra (=Alexandra) tells about the fall of Troy, and the fates of the Greek and Trojan Heroes. Dibdin calls this edition 'beautiful' and the 'editio optima'. He cites Harwood, who declares this work to be 'an everlasting monument of the learning of the illustrious editor'. The illustrious editor was the learned cleric John Potter, 1674-1747, who later in life, in 1737, was appointed bishop of Canterbury. Young Potter corrected in this edition the commentaries of Tzetzes using new manuscripts; he added indices, and annotations of himself. At the age of 14 Potter was sent to Oxford, University College. There he distinguished himself by his knowledge of Greek. Still a young man, in 1697, he produced his first edition of Lycophron. In 1698 Potter published his greatest success, the 'Archaeologia Graeca', which long remained a standard book for Greek students in Britain. In 1715 Potter produced his splendid edition of Clemens Alexandrinus. (Chalmers' Biography, 25,231) The first 146 p. of the 1702 edition contain the Greek text, with iuxtaposed the Latin prose translation of the Dutch classical scholar Willlem Canter (1545-1572), dating from 1566. The scholia are printed on the lower half of the page, together with the 'variantes lectiones' and the 'emendationes'. After the Greek text follows the metrical translation into smooth Latin made by J.J. Scaliger (1540-1609), which was published toghether with Canter's in 1566 in Basel. The second half of the book contains the notes (annotationes) of Canter and a specimen of Canter's versatility in Greek and Latin verse, the 'Epitome Cassandrae graeco-Latina, versibus Anacreontiis conscripta'. Added is also the commentary of the Dutch classical scholar Johannes Meursius (1579-1639), published in 1597 & 1599. At the end we find the commentary of John Potter himself) (Provenance: Small bookplate of the Swiss politician Karl Zeerleder, 1780-1851, on the front pastedown. Small blind stamped owner's mark of Mark Pattison, 1813-1884, in the right margin of the title. Pattison was like Potter a tutor at Lincoln College. In 1861 Pattison was elected rector. He is best known for his biography of the French classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, and for being Mr. Casaubon, a chief character in Middlemarch, the famous novel of George Eliot) (Collation: Frontispiece, pi2, a-b2, A-D2 E-2C4, 2D-2I2, chi1; *A-*Z4, *Aa4, *Bb2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140119 Euro 800,00
LYCOPHRON. LUKOPHRONOS TOU CHALKIDEÔS KASSANDRA. To skoteinon Poiêma; Kai eis auto touto ISAAKOU mallon de IÔANNOU TOU TZETZOU EXÊGÊMA. Lycophrois Chalcidensis Cassandra, obscurum poema ope XVI. codicum MSS. sanioribus subinde lectionibus restitutum, fideliori interpretatione exornatum, et accurata paraphrasi explicatum; cum Isaaci vel potius Johannis Tzetzae commentario. Ex postrema Oxoniensi editione ad fidem XIII. exemplarium bis mille ferme in locis emendato, notabiliter aucto, latine reddito, et illustrato. Accedunt fragmenta undique collecta, variantes lectiones, emendationes, et indices necessarii, studio et impensis Leopoldi Sebastiani. Roma, apud Antonium Fulgonium, 1803. 4to. (IV),XL,416,210 p., frontispiece, 1 plate. Calf 29.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,569: 'Im Text des Lykophron liess der Herausgeber vieles unverbessert, obwohl er einiges trefflich verbesserte. Mehr leistete er in dem Commentar des Tzetzes, den er auch latein. übersetzte'; Brunet 3,1248: Cette édition, peu commune en France') (Details: Brown morocco, first half 19th century, at any rate before 1857, the work of the English bookbinder 'C. Smith' according to a very tiny stamp on the verso of the first flyleaf. In the 'Database of Bookbindings' of the British Library one can find images of 3 other beautiful specimens of this master-binder, c155b17, c151k16 & Davis259. The back has 5 raised bands, and is gilt with palmette motifs; gilt lettering in second compartment; other compartments of the back strip gilt with repeated voluté's and triangles; double fillet gilt borders; gilt corner pieces with floral motifs; thrice gilt fillet borders on sides, and on inside of covers; all edges gilt; marbled endpapers; engraved armorial bookplate on inside frontcover; frontispiece of Cassandra as a prophetes, engraved by Aloysius Agricola, with at the foot the text of Aeneis 2, vss. 246/74; engraving of the 'Gemma Maffei' by G. Petrini on the title, at the foot another Cassandra quote from the second book of the Aeneis, vss. 403/4; 1 engraved plate, showing two Cassandra gemmae, by Dom Campiglia & Vin. Francescini) (Condition: A fine copy; a touch of rubbing to the joints; 1 small scratch on the 3rd compartment; some surface wear to the upper corner of the lower board; the binder has bound by mistake the 'commentarius' of 210 pages before the Greek text) (Note: Leopoldo Sebastiani, Italian classical scholar, priest and missionary. His exact dates are sofar unknown. At the end of the 18th century he was still a young man, for in the 'Bibliothecae Josephi Garampii cardinalis catalogus', Rome, 1796, p. 40, he is called 'Juvenis in recondita Graecorum eruditione valde versatus'. In this catalogue a future edition of the scholia to Homer of Eustathius is announced, a project that was apparantly aborted. The young man then turned to the Greek poet Lycophron, 3rd. century A.D. for an edition of his Cassandra, also known as Alexandra. The poem of 1500 iambic trimeters tells the profecies of the Trojan princes Kassandra, the fall of Troy and the fate of the Greek heroes. At the end are the profecies of the future supremacy of Rome. Sebastiani's edition is an ambitious one. After an introduction we find the Greek text, with a facing translation into Latin, made by the Dutch classicist Canter (Basel, 1566). Below the translation comes a Latin paraphrasis produced by Sebastiani; Added are the 'variantes lectiones', the extensive scholia, and the emendations to the Scholia. At the end a 'Selecta discrepantium lectionum silva'. Then an index to the Cassandra and the scholia; then follow 210 p. with the Latin translation of 'Isaaci sive Johannis Tzetzae Commentarius', and notes to the commentary. (The byzantine scholars Isaac and Johannes Tzetzes, who were brothers, lived in the 12th century). Three indices disclose this commentary. The contemporary reviewer of the GGA (Göttingische Gelehrte Anzeigen) calls the translation of the commentarius 'unendlich besser' than the translation of Basel, 1558. GGA praises Sebastiani's search for manuscripts of the Cassandra, the oldest of which dates from the 9th or 10th century, and which was once the property of Fulvius Ursinus. GGA: 'Alle Codices habe er mit der grössten Genauigkeit vergliche; das grösste Verdienst eignet er sich um die Scholien zu, worin er an 2000 Fehler verbessert habe'. GGA: 'Diese (i.e. Gelehrten) wirden finden, dass ihnen ihre Forschungen durch das was S. geleistet hat, sehr erleichtert sind'. The German reviewer is impressed, because Sebastiani produced this edition in the turmoil of an adventurous life as a missionary and a diplomat. He records 2 long travels to the Orient, up to Ispahan in Persia. Back in Constantinople Sebastiani was an honoured guest of Lord Elgin, because he had saved two Englishman. From another source we learn that the English held Sebastiani in high esteem 'for the losses he sustained, and misfortunes he suffered in consequence of important services which he gratuitously rendered to the British government while resident in Persia as president of the missionaries sent by the Church of Rome'. (Th.H. Horne, 'An introduction to the critical study and knowledge of the Holy Scriptures', London, 1818, vol. 2, p. 189). The reviewer of GGA rebukes the Latin of Sebastiani, he calls it 'oft sehr Orientalisch'. (Göttingische gelehrte Anzeigen, Göttingen, 1804 p. 340/4). A later French reviewer exclaimed: 'Mais quel latin!' Sebastiani is probably best known for his excellent translation of the New Testament, published in London in 1817. Th.H. Horne places this translation alongside those of the giants Erasmus and Beza, 'those of Erasmus, Beza and Sebastiani are particularly worth of notice'. 'In all doctrinal points, this version is made conformable to the tenets inculcated by the church of Rome'. (Horne p. vol. 2, p. 226). Sebastiani is also known for his 'Storia dell'Indostan' a history of India, published in 1820. He also translated parts of the Bible into Persian.) (Provenance: bookplate with the coat of arms of 'Joseph Neeld', with a banner reading: 'Nomen extendere factis'. Neeld, 1789-1856, was a wealthy English philanthropist, who had a good library and art collection. (Source http://bookplate-jvarnoso.blogspot.com/2007_12_01_archive.html). He was in 1830 Member of Parliament for Gatton, a rotten borough with six houses and one elector, but sending 2 members, which was abolished by the Reform Act of 1832. (Source Wikipedia) (Collation: a6, b-e4, A-3F4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140102 Euro 1000,00
LYSIAS & ISOCRATES. The orations of Lysias and Isocrates, translated from the Greek; with some account of their lives; and a discourse on the history, manners, and character of the Greeks, from the conclusion of the Peloponnesian war, to the battle of Chaeronea, by John Gillies, LL.D. London, Edinburgh, Printed for J. Murray, and J. Bell, 1778. 4to. (XXXVI),CXXXV,(1 blank),498,(1 errata)(1 blank) p.; 1 portrait of Lysias & 1 of Isocrates. Calf 28 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,490 & 2,575: 'eine gute Übersetzung'; Ebert 10628 & 12573; Dict. of British Classicists 2,370/2) (Details: Back ruled gilt and with 5 raised bands; red morocco shield with gold lettering in the second compartment; small and fading gilt coat of arms on the covers, within a surrounding banner, on which: 'The Society of writers to the Signet'. (This Society is a society of Scottish lawyers) Wide margins. Both engravings were made 'ex marmore antiquo in Museo Capitolino'. Edges dyed red) (Condition: Cover scuffed & scratched; extremities chafed; corners bumped; joints split but strong; front hinge cracking; some insignificant foxing; old ink inscription on the title reading: 'The Society of Clerks to the Signet') (Note: The speeches of the Athenian orators Lysias (c. 459-380 B.C.) and Isocrates (436-338 B.C.) are of great importance for the understanding of the great political issues of the 4th century. Their speeches provide us with a most valuable insight in, and commentary on the social and political events in Athens; The English translation of those speeches by the Scottish classical scholar and ancient historian John Gillies (1747-1836) is mentioned one of his major contributions to classical scholarship. 'In the long preliminary discourse on the history and private lives and manners of the Greeks during the period 404 to 338 B.C., Gillies specifically adopted Isocrates as his source, partly no doubt because it suited his own strongly monarchist views to do so'. (DBC 2,371). Gillies is best known for his 'History of Ancient Greece' (1786), 'the first substantial complete survey in English of the whole Greek history to the time of August'. It became popular, and was quickly translated into German and French) (Provenance: Stamp of the Scottish 'Society of the writers to the Signet' on the covers) (Collation: x4, A-C4, D2, a-3r4; B-3R4, 3S2 (portrait after leaf L1 and T3) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140113 Euro 425,00
MACROBIUS. Macrobii Ambrosii Aurelii Theodosii viri consularis In Somnium Scipionis libri II. Eiusdem Saturnaliorum libri VII. Ex vetustissimis manuscriptis codicibus recogniti & aucti. (Edited by) Joach. Camerarius. Basel (Basileae), Ex officina Ioan. Hervagii, 1535. Folio. (XL),334,2 p. Vellum 30 cm (Ref: VD16 ZV 20513; Schweiger 2,586: the first mentioned copy with the privilegium and the corrections. 'Neue, schätzbare Recension von Joach. Camerarius, nach 2 Handschriften'. Dibdin 2,220: 'under the care of the celebrated Camerarius, and by the help of several important MSS. there was hardly a verse in the poets quoted but what received very considerable emendation. (...) A volume, thus intrinsically valuable, will not fail to find a purchaser at a reasonable price'; Ebert 12716) (Details: Later vellum (18th century?). Brown morocco shield on the back; 2 thongs laced through both joints; Large printer's mark of Hervagius (Johann Herwagen the elder) on title, a different one on the verso of the last page, both depicting a three headed Hermes on a pillar; woodcut initials, 8 woodcuts and a woodcut map of the world in the text) (Condition: Some small and almost invisible repairs of the vellum; corners of the shield on the back partly gone; title browning, paper yellowing, some slight foxing; wormhole in right uppercorner of ca. 80 p., not coming near any text; pastedowns affected by a few small wormholes) (Note: Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius, a Roman senator and a classical scholar of the early 5th century A.D. 'was a notable link between the cultures of antiquity and the Middle Ages'. This edition contains his 2 most important works, the 'Saturnalia' and his 'Commentarii in Somnium Scipionis', the 'Dream of Scipio', a commentary on a part of 'De Republica' of the Roman orator Cicero. The Saturnalia are a learned compilation in 7 books cast in dialogue form, in which the cultural life of the former generation is idealized. Macrobius' aim is to provide his son with all the necessary hard to come by scientific knowledge. He did so in the form of a banquet. Macrobius was inspired by the Ciceronian dialogues 'De Oratore' and 'De Republica'. 'Set during the Saturnalia of 383, it gathers several (conspicuously non-Christian) members of the aristocracy and their entourage to discuss matters ridiculous (...) and sublime, (...) above all the poetry of Virgil. Quarried from mostly unnamed sources - including Gellius, Seneca, Plutarch, and the tradition of scholastic commentary today known from Servius, the discussion presents Virgil as the master of all human knowledge'. More influential in the Middle Ages and Renaissance was the commentary of Macrobius on the 'Somnium Scipionis'. Macrobius uses Cicero's text (De Republica 6,10 ff) as the starting point for a thoroughly Neoplatonic treatment of (especially) cosmology and the soul's ascent to the One, with direct debts to Porphyry and Plotinus.' Discussed are matters of mathematics, physics, cosmology, astronomy, geography, ethics. He thus forged a kind of compendium of science and philosophy, which transmitted classical knowledge to the medieval world, and was to hold a central position in the intellectual development of the West during the Middle Ages. His books belong to the basic sources of the scholastic movement and of medieval science. His work left traces in the works of Dante, Chaucer, Vives and Spenser. (Source for M. and the quotations: 'The Classical Tradition', Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 553). Joachim Camerarius, 1500-1574, holds one of the foremost places among the German classical scholars of the 16th century. Gudeman calls him even 'der bedeutendste Philologe Deutschlands im 16. Jahrh.' (Grundriss der Geschichte der klassischen Philologie, Lpz. 1909, p. 216) He held professorships at Nuremberg, Tübingen and Leipzig. 'His numerous editions of the Classics, without attaining the highest rank, are characterized by acumen and good taste'. (Sandys, 'History of Classical Scholarship' 2, p. 266/67) Camerarius was a man of vast knowledge. He also wrote on history, theology, mathematics, astronomy and paedagogy. He seems to have been just the man for editing the encyclopaedic works of Macrobius. Camerarius had evidently a high opinion of himself and his talents. Such we gather from the following distich on the titlepage: 'Qui tamen et nostri numerum vult scire laboris, annumeret versus totius ille libri', i.e. he left his mark in every line of verse in Macrobius. This book contains furthermore an interesting Macrobian map, a map which for a 1000 years formed the basis of world geography. It was first printed in 1482, showing the continents in the 'Alveus Oceani', a big Europe, and a rather small Africa and Asia. The round map is typically divided in 5 climatic zones. It shows the pre-Renaissance view of the world, Antipodeans and all. Our map shows the awakening of the passion for exploration and the cartographic progress in this period. Africa and Asia have grown hugely, and Europe has shrunk considerably. The lines of the climatic zone on the first map of 1482 were straight, suggesting a flat earth, on our map the lines are convex, indicating a world which is really a round ball. And the Antipodean part has gone. No sign however of America. The literature on the development of the Macrobian world view is immense) (Collation: alpha - beta6, gamma8, a - z6, A - E6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 027613 Euro 1800,00
MACROBIUS. Aur. Theodosii Macrobi v.cl. & inlustris Opera. Ioh. Isacius Pontanus recensuit, & Saturnaliorum libros MS. ope auxit, ordinavit, & castigationes sive notas adiecit. Ad amplissimum virum Arnoldum Witfeldium Regni Daniae Cancellarium. Contenta hoc libro vide pagina sequenti, quibus accedunt I. Meursi breviores notae. Leiden, Ex Officina Plantiniana, Apud Franciscum Raphelengium, 1597. 8vo. (XVI),697,(55) p. Limp overlapping vellum. 17 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,587: 'Eine englische Handschrift ist für die Verbesserung des Textes benutzt'; Ebert 12718: 'the notes are valuable'; Graesse 4,330) (Details: Printer's mark on the title: a pair of compasses, motto 'labore et sapientia') (Condition: Vellum soiled and wrinkled. A small piece of vellum has gone at the head of the spine. New leaf pasted on the front pastedown. Paper yellowing. Edges of the title slightly thumbed. Upper margin of the first gathering slightly & faintly waterstained. Small wormhole near the blank lower edge expertly & allmost invisibly repaired. Pencil numbers in the margin of liber 5 of the Saturnalia) (Note: Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius, a Roman senator and a classical scholar of the early 5th century A.D. 'was a notable link between the cultures of antiquity and the Middle Ages'. He left us 3 works, the 'Saturnalia', his 'Commentarii in Somnium Scipionis', the 'Dream of Scipio', a commentary on a part of 'De Republica' of the Roman orator Cicero, and a work on grammar 'De differentiis et societatibus Graeci Latinique verbi'. The Saturnalia are a learned compilation in 7 books cast in dialogue form, in which the cultural life of the former generations is idealized. Macrobius' aim is to provide his son with all the necessary, but hard to come by scientific knowledge. He did so in the form of a banquet. Macrobius was inspired by the Ciceronian dialogues 'De Oratore' and 'De Republica'. 'Set during the Saturnalia of 383 A.D. it gathers several (conspicuously non-Christian) members of the aristocracy and their entourage to discuss matters ridiculous (...) and sublime, (...) above all the poetry of Virgil. Quarried from mostly unnamed sources - including Gellius, Seneca, Plutarch, and the tradition of scholastic commentary today known from Servius, the discussion presents Virgil as the master of all human knowledge'. More influential in the Middle Ages and Renaissance was the commentary of Macrobius on the 'Somnium Scipionis'. Macrobius uses Cicero's text (De Republica 6,10 ff) as the starting point for 'a thoroughly Neoplatonic treatment of (especially) cosmology and the soul's ascent to the One, with direct debts to Porphyry and Plotinus.' Discussed are matters of mathematics, physics, cosmology, astronomy, geography, ethics. The third work is often left out in other editions of the Opera of Macrobius. It consists in fact of summaries found in several manuscripts from 'De differentiis'. It deals with the differences and the similarities of the Greek and Latin verb. Macrobius' categories of differences were later used and expanded by Isidorus of Sevilla. With this 3 works Macrobius forged a kind of compendium of science and philosophy, which transmitted classical knowledge to the medieval world, and which was to hold a central position in the intellectual development of the West during the Middle Ages. His books belong to the basic sources of the scholastic movement and of medieval science. His work left traces in the works of Dante, Chaucer, Vives and Spenser. (Source for M. and the quotations: 'The Classical Tradition', Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 553). The influence and popularity of Macrobius dwindled soon during the Renaissance. Schweiger records untill 1600 19 editions, and after 1600 till 1824 only 9 editions. The editor of this edition, the Dutch classical scholar and mathematician, Johannes Isaaczoon, better known as Johannes Isaac Pontanus, 1571-1639, was born at sea (hence his name), when his parents were on their way to Denmark. There he was for some time a helper of Tycho Brahe (NNBW I,1417, & ADB 26, 413/14). In a short 'Lector, amice' on the very last page Pontanus tells the reader that he has used the Stephanus edition of 1585, and an old Bologna edition of 1501. (The first one is according to Schweiger based on the edition of Camerarius of 1535, and the last one we could not trace in Schweiger, nor in KVK. There exists however a Macrobius which was published in Brescia in 1501) Pontanus furthermore tells in the introduction that he was able to restore vast lacunae in the text with the help of a very old English manuscript. Young Pontanus must have made in Leiden quite an impression. The text is preceded by a number of epigrammata of famous scholars in which Pontanus receives exuberant praise for having saved Macrobius, e.g. J.J. Scaliger, F. Dousa, F. Raphelengius, a long poem of Petrus Scriverius, and a Greek and Latin epigram of Hugo Grotius, who calls Pontanus the 'vindex', saviour of Macrobius. The text is followed by 117 pages filled with notes of Pontanus. The last 16 pages are filled with short notes of young Johannes Meursius, who was 18 years old in 1597, and still a student. Meursius was a child prodigy, who matriculated at the age of 12. He dedicates his notes to his 'praeceptor meo' the professor of Greek of the University of Leiden, Bonaventura Vulcanius. These short notes belong to the first fruits of this productive scholar. In 1606 Pontanus was appointed professor of Mathematics at the University of Harderwijk. In 1628 he produced a second edition) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in pencil: '17 mei, 1961', written by the Flemish linguist Walter Couvreur, 1914-1996, who was an Orientalist, and professor of Indoeuropean linguistics at the University of Gent. It indicates the date of aquisition. The place of acquisition he wrote on the flyleaf at the end: 'Parijs, Vrin') (Collation: *8, A-2X8, *-2*8, +8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120124 Euro 400,00
MACROBIUS. Aur. Theodosii Macrobii Opera V.Cl. & inlustris. Accedunt notae integrae Isacii Pontani, Joh. Meursii, Jacobi Gronovii. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Arnoldi Doude, Cornelii Driehuysen, 1670. 8vo. (XXXII),704,(68 index) p., frontispiece. Modern half calf. 19.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 832522376; Schweiger 2,587; Brunet 5,1286: 'édition assez estimée'; Ebert 12720; (STCN doesnot mention the existence of 2 canceled leaves. (See below in 'Details')) (Details: Modern & tasteful binding in antique style. Back with 5 raised bands. Boards covered with marbled paper. Frontispiece depicting Macrobius as a kind of 'penseur'. Woodcut printer's device on the title, depicting a pelican that feeds his 3 young with his own blood; the christian motto of the device is 'Vivimus ex Uno'. Some woodcut initials, and figures in the text. § The cancels of leaf A1 (p. 1/2) and X1 (p. 321/22) have not replaced the original leaves, as they should have; they were not cut out, but remained in their place; the cancels however have erroneously been bound at the end of the book between the leaves 3C1 & 3C2. The original leaf A1 has a shorter note at the bottom of the page, and a fingerprint 'ti', the cancel has a longer note, and its fingerprint is 'ta'; at the beginning of the not cancelled leaf X1 (p. 321/22) a complete line was left out by the printer; the cancel of this leaf at the end, with the complete and corrected text, has this line) (Note: Macrobius, ca. 400, is considered to be one of the last pagan Roman authors. His most important work is the Saturnalia, an account of a long dicussion held during a symposium on the occasion of the Saturnalia. The subjects discussed are grammar, philology, mythology, history. Macrobius also produced a commentary on the Somnium Scipionis of Cicero. The work of this late antique writer is important because he rescued opinions and passages from works that have been lost. The Dutch classical scholar Johannes Isaac Pontanus, 1571-1639, was born at sea (hence his name), when his parents were on their way to Denmark. There he was for some time a helper of Tycho Brahe (NNBW I,1417). In 1606 he became professor of Mathematics at the University of Harderwijk. His edition of Macrobius, which included also notes of the Dutch scholar Johannes Meursius, dates from 1597, a second edition from 1628. § This edition of 1670 was produced by the young Dutch scholar Jacobus Gronovius, 1645-1716, after having finished his studies at the University of Leiden under his father Johannes Fredericus Gronovius, 1611-1671, who was professor of Greek and History from 1658, and from 1665 librarian of the University Library of Leiden. It was Jacobus' first important scholarly feat. In the preface Gronovius tells us that his father allowed him to inspect and cleanse ancient manuscripts, and how he conceived the plan to collate two rather old Macrobius manuscripts that were in a bad shape. ('duorum (...) MStorum situ & squalore horrentium, satis tamen antiquam manum ostendentium')Later, in 1679, Jacobus succeeded his father as professor of History and Greek) (Provenance: Ownership entry of the Swedish professor Lennart Håkanson of Latin literature on the front flyleaf) (Collation: *-2*8, A-3B8, 3C1 (+ chi2) 3C2)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130250 Euro 380,00
MANUTIUS, PAULUS. Paulli Manutii Epistolarum libri XII, uno nuper addito. Eiusdem quae praefationes appellantur. Venice (Venetiis), Apud Io. Griffum, 1584. 8vo. (XVI),536,(2),128,(5 index),(1 blank) p. Boards 15 cm (Ref: Edit16 CNCE 35382; Graesse 4,375; cf. Brunet 3,1383) (Details: Woodcut printer's device of Gryphius on the title, depicting a griffin, which mythological animal symbolizes courage, diligence, watchfulness, and rapidity of execution, used as a pun of the family (of German origin) name Gryph or Greif. From the claws of this creature hangs a big rectangular stone, beneath which is a winged orb. Edit 16 calls for Griffius's motto on the title: 'Virtute duce / comite fortuna'; our copy however does not have this motto. Except for the 16 preliminary pages and the headings the book is printed completely in italics) (Condition: Binding very scuffed, the protecting paper on the boards is gone. Remnants of marbled paper on the back. The right upper corner of the front cover bumped, and the same corner of the first gathering is dog-eared. Endpapers worn. Ink stain of 9 cm long and 1 cm wide between the printer's mark and the imprint. First and last gathering slightly waterstained) (Note: The Italian classical scholar and printer Paulus Manutius, in Italian Paolo Manuzio, 1512-1574, 'was a Venetian printer with a humanist education, the third son of the famous printer Aldus Manutius and his wife Maria Torresano. Aldus died when the boy was two, and his grandfather and two uncles, the Asolani, carried on the Aldine Press. After a thorough education, Paolo assumed in 1533 direction of his father's business, which had been damaged by the elder generation's refusal to collaborate with scholarly editors. Paolo determined to revive the reputation of the press, and parted company with his uncles in 1540, devoting his output to the Latin classics. He was a passionate Ciceronian, and perhaps his chief contributions to scholarship are the corrected editions of Cicero's letters and orations (Epistolae ad familiares in 1540, Epistolae ad Atticum and Epistolae ad Marcum Iunium Brutum et ad Quintum Ciceronem fratrem in 1547), his own epistles in a Ciceronian style, and his Latin version of Demosthenes' Philippics (Demosthenis orationes quattuor contra Philippum, 1549). Throughout his life he combined the occupations of a scholar and a printer. As a scholar he is remembered for four elegant Latin treatises on Roman antiquities. His correct editions of the classics, printed in a splendid style, were highly esteemed, yet sales did not always support such productions'. (Wikipedia). Our copy is a reissue of the correspondence of Paulus Manutius, which was published by his son Aldus Manutius the Younger in 1580 in Venice. It is the most complete edition and has the same pagination. This correspondence in strict Ciceronian style was first published in 1558 by Paulus Manutius himself, was later revised and augmented, and found many reissues and repetitions) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf in pencil: '16 juni 1971', written by the Flemish linguist Walter Couvreur, 1914-1996, who was an Orientalist, and professor of Indoeuropean linguistics at the University of Gent. It indicates the date of aquisition. The place of acquisition he wrote on the flyleaf at the end: 'Bologna, Gulliera')(Collation: a8, A-X8, Aa-Tt8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120111 Euro 240,00
MARMONTEL, J.-F. Bélisaire. (Bound with:) (Anonymous) Hylaire, par un métaphysicien. Amsterdam, Chez E. van Harrevelt, 1767. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: 236,(4 blank);107,(5 blank) p. Half vellum 17 cm (Ref: Ad 1: Brunet 3,1440; cf. for the first Parisian edition of 1767 Cioranescu 43015; Ebert 13158. Ad 2: Cioranescu 42424) (Details: Short title in ink on the back. 3 thongs laced through the joints. The first title is printed in red and black) (Condition: Marbled patterns of the paper on the covers wearing away. Name on the front flyleaf) (Note: Ad 1: Marmontel's Bélisaire was banned in the year of its publication in Paris. The Frenchman Jean-François Marmontel, 1723-1799, was it all, historian, poet, novelist, librettist, playwright, philosopher. He was of poor descent, received a good education, and set out for Paris for fortune. Having produced some mediocre tragedies he gained access to the literary salons. In Paris he also became a member of the Encylopédie movement, and wrote a number of articles for this monument of the Enlightenment. Well known are his Contes Moraux, which picture French society before the Revolution. In 1767 he published his greatest success, Bélisaire, a historical novel and a philosophical Bildungsroman. Belisarius, ca. 500-565 A.D., was a general under the emperor Justinian. Byzantine legend made him a hero who failed because of jealousy of intriguing opponents. Belisarius is said to have been blinded on order of his emperor, and to have been reduced to the status of beggar. In the year of its publication the novel was already forbidden, mainly because of Marmontel's defence in chapter XV of religious tolerance. It was considered to be an attack upon the church and King Louis XV, and consequently greeted by Voltaire. The ban and the opposition of the church contributed of course to the popularity of the novel. This edition from Amsterdam was an answer to the growing demand. At the end the Dutch publisher has added quelques morceaux de philosophie, du même Auteur, & d'un genre analogue à celui de Bélisaire, entitled De la Gloire, Des Grands, De la Grandeur. The novel was translated into almost all modern languages, also in Latin and Newgreek, and it even became a schoolbook in Germany. In one year it sold more than 40000 copies Europe-wide. Marmontel's novel made Belisarius also a popular subject for painters in the Age of Enlightenment. The best known of them is the French painter Jaques-Louis David. The loyal Belisarius became a secular saint and was depicted as the victim of the repression of ruthless and ungrateful rulers. Belisarius remained popular and several historical novels were dedicated to him. The best known is Count Belisarius by the English author Robert Graves, published in 1938. In the Foundation Series of Isaac Asimow one of the figures, the last great general, is based on Belisarius. Eventually Belisarius entered popular culture, and was even visited and helped in science fiction by time-travellers. Ad 2: Hylaire, a parody of the Bélisaire, was published anonymously in the same year. The author is the publicist Jean Marchand. He reduces, he says in his introduction, Belisarius to a simple Bourgeois. He adds (on page IV & V of the préface) Cette entreprise, loin d'être une dégradation de l'original, est un hommage qu'on lui rend. Homere, Virgile, Télémaque, la Henriade, Inez ont été parodiés. Et c'est un honneur qu'on n'a jamais attribué qu'aux meilleurs Ouvrages.) (Provenance: Name on front flyleaf of 'Rud Deinhard, Coeln Jan. 1838'. On the internet we found one Rudolph Deinhard, of whom is told that he married in 1846, and that he was k. preuss. Oberst a. D. (Coblenz)) (Collation: A-P8 (leaf P7 & P8 blank); A-G8 (leaf G6 verso, G7 & G8 blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120483 Euro 225,00
MARTIALIS. M. Valerii Martialis Epigrammata, paraphrasi et notis Variorum selectissimis, ad usum Serenissimi Delphini interpretatus est Vincentius Colleso, J.C., numismatibus, historias atque ritus illustrantibus, exornavit Lud. Smids, M.D. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud G. Gallet, Praefectum Typographiae Huguetanorum, 1701. 8vo. (XXXII),600;56;142 p., 22 plates Vellum. 20 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 175529442; Schweiger 2,599; Brunet 3,1492: 'Édition assez recherchée'; Dibdin 2,231; Moss 2,303: 'A valuable edition, and ornamented with very elegant figures'; Graesse 4,425; Ebert 13261) (Details: 5 thonghs laced through the joints. 'Martialis' in old ink written at the head of the spine. Woodcut ornament on the title. 126 engravings of ancient Roman coins on 22 plates) (Condition: Vellum soiled. Occasional pencil crosses at the beginning of an epigram. Small stamp on the front flyleaf. Same stamp on the title) (Note: The Roman epigrammist Martial, ca. 41-104 A.D., embraced in his 14 books of epigrams 'many topics: flattery of social superiors, satire of man's foibles, eroticism'. (The Classical Heritage, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 565/66) Contemporaries valued his work for its frankness and wit. Later Renaissance authors mined his work and sparked a resurgence of Neo-Latin and vernacular epigrams throughout Europe. This book was originally published for the education of the Dauphin (Delphinus), the young crown prince of France, the future king Louis XV. Great care was bestowed on the editing and printing of the series. 39 editions of Latin authors, from Cicero to Ausonius, also difficult ones like Festus and Manilius, were published by leading or promising French scholars. They were also meant for a broad public and offered introductions, reliable and readable texts, easy interpretations, and philological, educational and historical notes without too much philological niceties, or textual criticism. The series was a huge success. This particular edition of Martial was a weak link in the series, and had consequently little success, for it was reissued only once, in 1701. It was originally produced by the otherwise unknown French jurist Vincentius Collesso, or Vincent Collesson, and was first published in Paris in 1680. 'Cette édition ne représente (...) pas un progrès dans l'histoire du texte de Martial, puisque'elle s'apparente, aussi bien pour le texte que pour le paratext, à une compilation'. ('La collection Ad usum Delphini', Grenoble, 2000-2005, vol. 2, p. 227/235) It is in fact a compilation, or better a Variorum-edition. Collesso based his edition on the work of the Dutch latinist Hadrianus Junius (1511-1575), published in 1559 and 1568. Martial's obscenity created a dilemma for editors. Censors banned and expurgated the poems. The solution of Collesson concerning this moral danger was elegant, he omitted from the main text, without any explanation, 151 'pornographic' epigrams, the socalled 'Obscoena', and hid them at the end of the text before the index. The obscene poems were however only accompanied by notes, and were printed without the 'interpretatio' in easy Latin. This in order not to hurt the tender soul of the Dauphin, and the taste of the civilized reader. This edition of 1701 is the only reissue of the Martial of Collesso. It was produced by the Dutch scholar Ludolf Smids, who enriched and eludicated the text with engravings of numerous coins. At the end, as in the original edition of 1680, we find on 56 pages the 'epigrammata obscoena'. Ludolf Smids, 1649-1720, became Doctor of Medicin in 1673 in Leiden. He went to live in Amsterdam, where he spent more time on the study of history, antiquities, poetry and numismatics than as medical practioner. He wrote plays, poetry, and several books on numismatics. (Van der Aa, 17/2, 760) (Provenance: Stamps on the title and front flyleaf: 'Bibliotheca viri F.J. Corstens'; In: 'Verslag van den Staat der Hooge-, Middelbare en Lagere Scholen in het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden over 1881-1882' (1882), page 107, we found a Dutch classicist F.J. Corstens, who taught in 1881/82 Greek and Latin at a kind of 'Progymnasium', the 'Bijzondere school van voorbereidend hooger onderwijs met vierjarigen curcus, te Elburg') (Collation: * - 2*8, A-2O8 2P4 (a leaf chi1 inserted after 2B6, a kind of short praefatio by Smids); a-c8 d4; 2a-i8 (minus blank leaf i8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130130 Euro 380,00
MARTIALIS. M. Val. Martialis epigrammata demptis obscenis. Addidit annotationes & interpretationem Josephus Juvencius, e Societate Jesu. Venice (Venetiis), Apud Nicolaum Pezzana, 1736. 12mo. (X),685,(24 index) p. Vellum 15.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,599 mentions only the first edition of 1693) (Details: 2 thongs laced through cover. Latin text followed by a commentary in 2 columns) (Condition: Binding soiled. Lower corner bumped. Title dust-soiled) (Note: The Roman epigrammist Martial, ca. 41-104 A.D., embraced in his 14 books of epigrams 'many topics: flattery of social superiors, satire of man's foibles, eroticism'. (The Classical Heritage, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 565/66). Contemporaries valued his work for its frankness and wit. Later Renaissance authors mined his work and sparked a resurgence of Neo-Latin and vernacular epigrams throughout Europe. § Martial's obscenity created a dilemma for editors. Censors banned and expurgated the 151 pornographic epigrams, the so-called Obscoena, not wanting to hurt the taste of the civilized reader, or they simply hid them at the end of the text before the index, as happened e.g. in the edition for the young Dauphin. (Paris 1680) Voltaire did not appreciate Martialis, he chided him for his images grossières. § This school edition of Martial is the work of the French Jesuit scholar, poet and paedagogue Joseph de Jouvancy, or Jouvency, in Latin Josephus Juvencius, 1643-1719. Jouvancy entered the Society of Jesus when he was sixteen, 'and after completing his studies he taught grammar at the college at Compiègne, and rhetoric at Caen and the College of La Flèche. He made his profession in the latter place in 1677 and was afterwards appointed professor at the Lycee Louis-le-Grand in Paris. In 1699 he was called by his superiors to Rome to continue the history of the Society of Jesus begun by Niccolo Orlandini, and was engaged on this work until his death. (...) Jouvancy edited a large number of school editions of Latin authors, including Terence, Horace, Juvenal, Persius, Martial, the Metamorphoses of Ovid and the philosophical writings of Cicero, such as De Officiis, Cato Major and Laelius'. The texts were revised and purged for school use, and supplied with footnotes in Latin. 'These expurgated editions were frequently reissued well into the 19th century, both in France and other countries'. (Source for Jouvancy Wikipedia)) (Collation: A - 2G12) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120474 Euro 90,00
MAUNDRELL,H. A journey from Aleppo to Jerusalem at Easter, A.D. 1697. The sixth edtion, to which is now added an account of the author's journey to the banks of Euprhrates at Beer, and to the country of Mesopotamia. With an index to the whole work, not in any former edition. By Hen. Maundrell, M.A. late fellow of Exeter Coll. and Chaplain to the factory of Aleppo. Oxford, Printed at the Theatre, for A. Peisley bookseller in Oxford, and W. Meadows bookseller in Cornhill, 1740. 8vo. (XI),(I),171,(1 blank) p., 9 folding plates, 6 full page plates, 3 text illustrations. Modern cloth 22 cm (Ref: The library of Henry M. Blackmer II, Ldn. 1989, no, 214; Brunet 3,1542) (Details: Tasteful and simple modern binding with an gilt red morocco shield on the back; engraving of the Sheldonian Theater on the title, executed by M. Cole; the first plate is a view on Aleppo; there are engravings of Mount Carmel and Tabor; 7 folding plates the monuments of Baalbeck; 2 texts engraving of an inscription) (Condition: 2 small letters stamped on the title; paper very slightly yellowing; some foxing ) (Note: The Holy Land has been a site for Christian pilgrimage since the 3rd century A.D. Throughout the Middle Ages christians visited Palestine, and during the Crusades even tried to conquer it. A great number of travelogues were written by pilgrims about the marvels of well known and venerated cities as Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Nazareth etc. Ever since medieval times also English travellers have recorded their impressions of their visits to the Orient. One of the earliest was the 'Voiage' of the Anglo-Frenchman Sir John Mandeville. An outstanding and interesting travel story is Henry Maundrell's. It illustrates the emergence of a new genry of travel writing, and the shift in European minds concerning its relationship with the Holy Land. 'Where medieval pilgrims had often wept or gone into trances upon their arrival in Jerusalem, modern European visitors observed with curiosity what was before their eyes. They are travelling for pleasure and for cultural experiences; tourism was gradually replacing pilgrimage as a motive for visiting Palestine. By the end of the 17th century quite a few European tourists had already been to Jerusalem. The most famous among them was Henry Maundrell, the author of the book 'A journey from Aleppo to Jerusalem'. It would prove to be one of the most popular books about the East for centuries to come. By 1749 seven editions in different languages had appeared, and sections of the book continued to appear in collections of travel writings published in the 18th and 19th centuries' ('Maundrell in Jerusalem, Reflections on the writing of an early European tourist' by I. Nassar, in 'Jerusalem Quarterly', 2000,9); Maundrell's record is not a guide to the holy sites, or anthropological study, but a diary in which he reflects upon the sights worth seeing, and things worth doing. It is organized chronologically. Henry Maundrell, an Oxford academic and clergyman, born in 1655, made the trip shortly after his arrival in Aleppo in 1996, where he was elected to the post of chaplaincy of the British Levant Company. It paid him £100 per year. He travelled 'in Company with 14 others of our Factory. We went by the coast; and having visited the several places consecrated by the Life and Death of our Blessed Lord, we returned by the way of Damascus'. (p. (VII). The fellowhip started on the 26th of february, and returned on the 11th of May. On Eastern they were in Jerusalem, where they were bewildered by the behaviour of the local fellow christians in the Holy Sepulcher Church. Maundrell describes them as hystical rabble, who 'very much discredited the Miracle. (...) a scandal to the Christian Religion'. (p. 97) Maundrell's account of biblical sites reflects his fascination with science and biblical history at the same time. He shows little interest in the indigenous Christians, Arabs, and Jews, and he loathes the Turkish administration and the Turks. Maundrell died in Aleppo in 1701. His record is important for historians of Palestine, the Near East, and of the Ottoman empire) (Provenance: On the title a stamp of 2 letters: 'G.U.') (Collation: a2, b4, A-U4, X2, Y4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130445 Euro 550,00
MEURSIUS,J. Joannis Meursii De Regno Laconico libri II. De Piraeeo (Atheniensium portu celeberrimo, & ejusdem antiquitates) liber singularis, et in Helladii chrestomathiam animadversiones. Omnia nunc primum prodeunt. Utrecht (Ultrajecti), Apud Guiljelmum vande Water, 1686 - 1687. 4to. 2 parts in1: (II),108,(12 index);(VIII),51,(7 index) p. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: In STCN; Brunet, Ebert, Graesse) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints; woodcut engraving of a fruit basket on the titles) (Condition: Vellum somewhat soiled; pinpoint hole in front joint; lacking the third part: 'In Helladii chrestomathiam animadversiones'; the titles of both works have been switched by the binder; to confuse matters more, the dedicatio, which belongs to the first part has erroneously been bound in the second part) (Note: Johannes Meursius (Johannes van Meurs), 1579-1639, was a Dutch classicist and historian, and professor of History and Greek since 1610/13 in the university of Leiden. He is best known for his editions of byzantine authors, and for the books he wrote on the history of ancient Greece, for example on festivals, Eleusis, and the antiquities of Athens and Attica. His work was widely used as source by later ancient historians; (Sandys 2,310/11) (Collation: pi1, A-P4, *4, Q4 (minus leaf Q1) R-X4, Y6 (minus leaf Y6; pi1 = Q1?) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130328 Euro 250,00
MINUCIUS FELIX. M. Minucius Felicis Octavius. Cum integris omnium notis ac commentariis, novaque recensione Jacobi Ouzelii, cujus & accedunt animadversiones. Accedit praeterea liber Julii Firmici Materni V.C. De errore profanarum religionum. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Ioannis Maire, 1652. 4to. (38),44,(2),46,140,36,32,212,(23),56 p. Overlapping vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 840085141; Breugelmans 1652:10B; Schoenemann I,71; Ebert 14107; not in Brunet; Graesse 4,534; Ebert 14107) (Details: Title in red & black. Engraved printer's mark on the title depicting a farmer stamping a shovel into the ground, he is flanked by a woman holding a cornucopiae, and a woman holding an ancre, above the head of the farmer the motto: 'fac et spera'. According to Breugelmans there are 2 issues of this edition: 1652:10A and 1652:10B; 10A shows on the title 3 lines printed red, and 10B (our copy) has 5 lines printed red; 10B also has 2 cancels (leaves *2 and E4); in our copy these 2 leaves have not been cancelled; our copy is conform the copy in the University Library of Leiden, UBL 503 C 2) (Condition: Cover somewhat soiled. Small ink stain, only touching the top of the right upper corner of the first 30 pages; small ownership inscription on the title. Some gatherings browning. Some small spots of paper near the inner gutter of the front pastedown eaten away; our copy lacks leaf pi2, the leaf after the title, showing the table of contents) (Note: This dialogue is perhaps the oldest literary work of christian Latin. It was written by Minucius Felix, who lived in the second or third cent. A.D. In it he tries to prove that christian principles were not contrary to pagan culture; the Greek and Roman philosophers of antiquity paved the path for christianity. § Jacobus Ouzelius (Oiselius), 1631-1686, born as Jacques Oisel (Oesel) in Dantzig, was only 21 when he edited this book. Although destined for a commercial career, he chose to study classical literature in Leyden. Later he switched to law and became professor of law in Groningen. He also edited Gaius and Gellius. (Van der Aa, vol. 14, p. 59) Ouzelius says in the 'praefatio' that he hopes that the reader will forgive him any mistakes, without 'livor' and 'maledicentia'. He dedicates the book to Queen Christina of Sweden. Well, if we may believe Schoenemann, Christina had reason for complaint. Schoenemann is very critical about Ouzelius. He calls him a 'futilissimus commentator'. 'Omnia apta inepta incredibile stupore et imprudentia corrosa sunt'. The value of this edition lies in the printed commentaries of previous commentators. The reader should skip the 212 p. filled with notes by Ouzelius, and consult the presented notes of Nicolaas Rigaltius (32 p.), or Desiderius Heraldus, or the 'liber commentarius ad M. Minucii Felicis Octavium' by G. Elmenhorst (140 p.), or the notes of J.A. Wouwer (46 p.). Nic. Rigaltius, (Rigault) 1577-1624 (See Sandys 2,283); Desiderius Heraldus, ca. 1579-1649, professor of Greek at Sedan (See Sandys 2,287). J.A. Wowerius, 1574-1612, was a pupil of Scaliger, and helped him with his Petronius edition. Wowerius published his edition and commentary earlier in 1603 at Copenhagen (See Sandys 2,287). Elmenhorst published in 1612 at Hamburg a text and commentary on Minucius Felix (See Schoenemann I,71). § At the end has been added 'De errore profanarum religionum' by Julius Firmicus Maternus, edited by Wowerius, with his commentary. Firmicus lived in the 4th century A.D. In this work he urges the emperors Constans and Constantius, both sons of Constantine the Great, the man who in 313 A.D. had declared christianity to be the state religion, to abolish paganism) (Provenance: Engraved armorial bookplate (with ducal coat of arms?) on the front pastedown: 'Bibliothek Oberherrlingen, 1839' with the initials 'E. M.' on it of Eugen, Freiherr von Maucler, 1783-1859. The name of Paul Friedrich Theodor Eugen Maucler is connected with the legislation of the kingdom of Württemberg under 'König Wilhelm'. In 1818 he became minster of justice. His legislative work gave him great influence. He was hated by the liberals and resigned in 1848. (ADB 20, p. 687-688) Having bought 'Schloss Herrlingen' Maucler had room enough to build a huge library. Libraries all over the world hold a host of valuable incunabula and 16th century books from his library. The incunabula were sold at the beginning of last century) (Collation: pi1 (lacking leaf pi2) *2, 2*-5*4, A-E4 F2; A2 B-F4, G2; a2 b-3k4; A-G4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130151 Euro 350,00
MOERIS ATTICISTES. Moeridis Atticistae lexicon atticum, cum Jo. Hudsoni, Steph. Bergleri, Claud. Sallierii, aliorumque notis. Secundum ordinem MSStorum restituit, emendavit, animadversionibusque illustravit, Joannes PIERSONUS. Accedit Aelii Herodiani Philetaerus, e Ms nunc primum editus, item ejusdem fragmentum e MSS. emendatius atque auctius. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Petrum van der Eyk & Cornelium de Pecker, 1759. 8vo. (IV),66,(2),480,44 p. Vellum. 21.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 240337786; Brunet 3,1788: 'Bonne édition, dans laquelle le texte a été rétabli d'après des manuscrits'; Graesse 4,558: 'la meilleure édition'; Ebert 14181: 'The best edition. A new recension from MSS. and restored to its original order'; Neue Pauly 8, col. 343/4: still the first listed edition) (Condition: Head of the spine damaged, that is: a small piece has gone, and there are 2 tears of about 4 cm. Bookplate on the front pastedown. Some gatherings are browning) (Note: This edition is according to Klaus Alpers in the Neue Pauly, (2001) s.v. 'Lexikographie' a very important contribution to Greek lexicography (NP 15,130). Johannes Pierson was a much promising Dutch philologist, born in 1731, who died young in 1759 in Leeuwarden, where he was rector of the 'Schola Latina' since 1755. At the university of Franeker, where the Renaissance of Dutch Greek studies had begun, he was a pupil of J.C. Valckenaer and Is. Schrader. In 1751 he matriculated at the University of Leyden to hear Tiberius Hemsterhuis. Hemsterhuis advised his students to use especially the lexica of the ancients. The ancient lexicographers could be of great use for the amending of texts of classical authors, and they were of great help to gain a profound knowledge of the Greek language and its vocabulary. Valckenaer had chosen Ammonius, Pierson chose Moeris Atticistes. This was a great age for ancient lexicographers. In 1754 D. Ruhnkenius published his edition of the Platonic dictionary of Timaeus Sophista. (Sandys 2,461; NNBW 3, 976/77; Gerretzen, 'Schola Hemsterhusiana', 1940, p. 46 & 100). § Moeris (Moiris), Greek grammarian and lexicographer from ca. 200 AD. He compiled a lexicon for the use of correct Attic under the title 'Lexeis Attikôn kai Hellênôn kata stoicheion'. Examples of correct Greek are taken from Plato, Thucydides, Xenophon, the Attic orators and Aristophanes. (NP 8,343/4). The last 50 p. of Pierson's edition is filled with the 'editio princeps' of the Philetaerus of Herodian. Nowadays this ancient lexicon is only ascribed to Herodian, one of the most important Greek grammarians, who lived in the 2nd cent. A.D. (cf. NP 5,465/6)) (Provenance: Bookplate of Dr. Th. A. Vijlbrief Charbon. Theodora Anna Vijlbrief Charbon, 1908-2002, wrote a dissertation 'Speldegeld en clavarium', Haarlem, 1955. Clavarium occurs only once, in Tacitus' Histoirae III,50,6: 'clavarium donativi nomen est'. The dissertation further investigates the concept of 'donativum', 'salarium', 'vestiarium', 'pinmoney' in different languages, and the 'spike' and 'pin' in ancient folklore. § On the front flyleaf the name of 'H.C. Muller, 1892', and of 'Th.A. Charbon, Utrecht 1930'. H.C. Muller, 1855-1927 was a well known Dutch classicist, freethinker and socialist. His most important work is 'Historische Grammatik der Hellenischen Sprache, 2 vols., 1891/2'. (BWSA 1 (1986), p. 85/7)) (Collation: *-4*8, 5*4, A-2I8 2K6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130121 Euro 180,00
MONTESQUIEU. Considerations sur les causes de la grandeur des Romains et de leur décadence. Amsterdam, Chez J. Wetstein, 1746. 8vo. (IV),(IV),190,(2 blank) p., frontispiece. Mottled calf. 15.5 cm (Ref: Not in Brunet, Cioranescu, Graesse or Ebert. Not in L. Vian, 'Montesquieu, bibliographies des oeuvres') (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands. Marbled endpapers. Engraved frontispiece, depicting an Roman emperor on his throne. Title in red and black. Engraved printer's mark of the Wetstein family on the title, depicting 2 sphinxes and 2 winged putti grouped around a round shield with a burin on it; the burin is being sharpened on a whetstone (Wetstein!); around the shield the device: 'Terar dum prosim'. Edges dyed red) (Condition: Binding somewhat scuffed. Joint of the lower board split, but strong, the joint of the upper board beginning to split. Name on the front flyleaf) (Note: The idea of a Golden, Silver, Bronze and Iron Age, each age of lesser splendour than the preceding one, is a topos in European literature. 'From the ancient world, medieval and modern historians and moralists inherited a rich vocabulary for describing and analysing decline (...) Decline was viewed fundamentally moral and associated with softness and effeminacy. It was the inevitable effect of the rise of civilization'. (The classical tradition, N.Y. 2010, p. 782) The vocabulary of decline was common in the influential Roman historians Sallust and Tacitus. Their work offered Renaissance historians and politicians like Leonardi Bruni and Machiavelli, opportunities for interpreting in vivid colours the progress and decline of their states. § The French political philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment, Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu, or simply Montesquieu, 1689-1755, who opposed despotism, follows in his 'Considerations sur les causes de la grandeur des Romains et de leur décadence', Sallust by stressing the disease of corruption, 'but (he) also innovates by discussing economic reasons for decline, implying a parallel with the decline of Spain in the 17th century'. (op. cit. p. 783) Montesquieu published his 'Considerations' anonymously in Amsterdam in 1734, but the 'privilège' of an edition of 1735 already reveals the name of its author. The anonymous is indicated in this edition of 1746, at the end of an 'avertissement du libraire', as 'Auteur des Lettres Persanes', who was, as every educated person of that time knew, Montesquieu. Of all the writings of Montesquieu, this title has remained one of the most popular. It has become a classic. The 'Considerations' is more a political treatise than the work of an ancient historian, it is a political reflection of great scope on the idea of freedom. Montesquieu performs a frontal attack on established ideas, disregards traditional chronology, and wipes the floor with established reputations. It indirectly critizes the imperialistic politics of the French state. Montesquieu's view on Roman history was revolutionary. He refused for instance to accept the thesis of Rome's grandeur. In the first 8 chapters he explains that the Romans owed their success not to fortune or their characteristic features, or even devine providence, but to human factors. They were more cunning, more experienced and more suspicious than others. The decline set in with the Civil Wars in the first century B.C. Then follow 15 chapters describing the 15 centuries of decline, the struggle for life, the last convulsions, revivals and utter ruin. For the first half of the book Montesquieu consulted the Roman historians Polybius, Florus. Especially the last one was constantly on his desk. It is said that Montesquieu imitated Florus' concise style. The Frenchman borrowed also from Machiavelli, whose 'Les Discours sur la première décade de Tite-Live' he had read and reread. § This Amsterdam edition of 1746 is a reissue of the first edition of 1734. It even imitates the colours and the lay-out of its title page. It has also 2 peculiarities, it is virtually unknown to bibliographers, and it contains at the end (fin) a dialogue of 9.5 pages, the 'Dialogue de Sylla et d'Eucrate', of which dialogue the bibliographies state that it was first added to the second edition of the 'Considerations' (Paris 1748), which was revised by the author himself. The dialogue 'Sylla et d’Eucrate' was first published in the 'Mercure de France, numéro de février 1745', and was appended to the end of the second revised of 1748', it is said by the editor of the complete works of Montesquieu Édouard Laboulaye, for the first time by Montesquieu himself. (Oeuvres complètes de Montesquieu, volume 2, 1876, p. 329) In all subsequent editions these two works are inseparable. The statement that the short dialogue 'Sylla et Eucrate' was only added in 1748 by the author clearly contradicts our copy of 1746, an issue of the otherwise first edition, which includes this dialogue. Has Montesquieu seen a copy of this book, noticed the appended dialogue, and thought that this was a good idea, and added it also to the second authorized edition of 1748? The dialogue has merits of its own: 'Nos maîtres littéraires ont toujours proposé à notre admiration ce dialogue célèbre ; ils y ont vu un des chefs-d’œuvre de l’esprit humain' (Op. cit. ibidem)) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf: 'H.A. Tromp') (Collation: pi2, *2, A-M8 (leaf K8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120281 Euro 280,00
MONTGOMERY, JAMES. The world before the flood, a poem in ten cantos; with other occasional pieces. Second edition. London, printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row, 1813. 12mo. III-XVI;328,(1),(3 blank) p. Calf 17 cm (Details: Back with 3 gilt raised bands; gilt title in second compartment; other 3 compartments with blindstamped palmette cornerpieces. Both boards with tenfold blindstamped fillet borders, within blindstamped floral borders, a blindstamped wave/flood pattern in the central panel) (Condition: Cover shows wear to the extremes. Lacking the half-title before the title, with the text: 'The world before the flood, with other occasional pieces') (Note: James Montgomery, 1771-1854, was a British poet, philanthropist and campainer for humanitarian causes. He achieved some literary fame with The wanderer of Switzerland in 1806, against the annexation of that country by the French. The abolishment of slavery is the theme of his The West Indies, published 3 years later. He created a reconstruction of the world from the creation to the Deluge in his The world before the flood, published in 1812. The author states in his preface that he is under obligation of no other authority whatever. The work was a success, and sold more than 10000 copies) (Collation: pi-6, A4, 2A8, B4, 2B8 etc.- N4, 2N8, O2, 2O4, P4 (leaf P3 verso and leaf P4 blank) (Between the gatherings A till N there is a regular alternation in the signature of the gatherings, each gathering, signed A etc. till N numbers 4 leaves, and is immediately followed by a gathering signed 2A etc. till 2N, numbering 8 leaves)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120475 Euro 90,00
MOSCHION. (MUSTIO) MOSCHIÔNOS PERI TÔN GUNAIKEIÔN PATHÔN. Moschionis De mulierum passionibus liber. Quem ad mentem Manuscripti graeci in Bibliotheca Caesaro Regia Vindobonensi asservati, tum propriis correctionibus emendavit, additaque versione latina edidit F.O. DEWEZ, (Suae Celsitudinis Regiae Archiducis Mariae Annae Coenobii Virginum nobilium Pragensis Abbatissae Archiater) Vienna (Viennae), Apud Rud. Gräffer et Soc., 1793. 8vo. (VI),I-X,(XII); 240 p., 2 text engravings of the uterus. Contemporary blue/green stiff paper wrappers 19.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,601; Ebert 14452 (dates erroneously 1795); Brunet 3,1920; Schweiger 1,207) (Details: Introduction, Greek text, Latin translation, notes; no index) (Condition: 4 gatherings of the Latin translation are foxed) (Note: This Greek handbook for midwives was once attributed to Moschion, a physician who lived in the first century A.D. 'Eine gynäkologische Abhandlung die Moschion zugeschrieben wird, ist in Wirklichkeit eine byzantinisch-griechische Fassung der Gynaecia des Mustio'. (NP 8,414) Mustio (also known as Muscio), who probably lived in North Africa ca. 500 AD, is the translator into Latin of 2 gynaeological treatises of the Greek physician Soranus, one of the most learned and lucid medical writers in antiquity. One is the famous 'Gynaikeia', the other a shortened version of the 'Gynaikeia'. This shortened version, in the form of a catachismus (questions and answers), was a kind of general gynaeological handbook, for doctors, midwives, but also for educated laymen. The Greek text of this handbook of Soranus was however lost, but the Latin translation of Mustio survived. It became the most widespread gynaeological handbook during the Middle Ages in the West. This Latin handbook in turn was used at some moment in the MA for a new translation, but now back into Greek, and it was then attributed to Moschion. (NP 8,558) 'Soranus zeigt eine hochstehende, rational begründete geburtshilflich-gynäkologische Arbeitstechnik mit Anwendung von Geburtsstuhl und Vaginalspeculum, sowie ausführliche Säuglingspflegelehre'. (NP 11,740) The handbook describes the anatomy of the female genital system, gives midwives advice on the diet and treatment of pregnant women and babies, and how to act on the delivery. A delivery chair was advised. Much is common sense, and still applicable. The anatomical knowledge concerning the uterus is good, but less good when confusing tendons with nerves. In antiquity midwives usually perfomed the uncomplicated delivery, and doctors were only called in in difficult cases, a practice which survives in the Netherlands until this day. 'Soranus obstetric and gynecology shows progress in comparison with that of his predecessors, for example Celsus'. (O. Temkin, Roman medicin, Omaha 1998, p. 146) His gynaecology represents the gynaelogical and obstetrical practice of the ancients at its height. Many of his teachings remained part of medical practice in the Middle Ages, and were still highest wisdom in the 16th century. The handbook consists of 152 short chapters, in each of which a question is addressed, the first and second being: 'Quid est obstetrix?', and 'Uterus quot nominibus insignitur?' or question 46: 'Quale est sedile obstetricium?' or 76: 'Quaenam igitur instruenda est nutricis diaeta'. The Greek translation, which was attributed to Moschion, was first published in Basel in 1566 by Caspar Wolf. The editor and translator of the edition of 1793 was Joseph Oliver Dewez, 1735-1814, from Luxemburg. He studied medicin in Vienna, and was appointed court physician (Hofmedicus) under Emperor Joseph II, and from 1792 till her death he was personal physician of Archduchess Maria Anna. The description of his function on the title of the Moschion is as follows: 'personal physician (archiater) of the Archduchess Maria Anna (of Austria), abbess of the Imperial Convent for Noble Ladies in Prague'. Dewez was her 'archiater' from 1792 till her death in 1789. We assume that he treated also the other noble nuns. Maria Anna was a daughter of Maria Theresia, and a sister of Marie Antoinette, she lived from 1738 till 1789. Maria Anna was disabled and suffered from a bad health. She never found a husband, and was in 1766 made abbess of the Convent in Prague. Most of the time she lived in a convent at Klagenfurth, where 'ihr Leibartz' (Dewez?) 'betreute auch die Patientinnen des Spitals'. (Wikipedia 'Maria Anna von Österreich') In 1790 F.O. Dewez published a German translation of a treatise of Aretaeus Cappadocius. On the title of it he is called: 'Kaiserl.-Königl. Hofmedicus' i.e. a court physician. He probably didnot treat the emperor himself, because Joseph II had his own personal physician, Joseph Freiherr von Quarin (See Wikipedia s.v. Quarin). Dewez translated also a tract of Hippocrates (1802), wrote a great number of articles in medical periodicals, and was a member of the 'Medizinische Hochschule' of Vienna. (Some information on Dewez in 'Biographisches Lexikon der hervorragende Aerzte aller Zeiten, vol. 2', Wien & Leipzig, 1885, p. 175) In the preface of this edition Dewez tells us that he found in the Imperial Library the Manuscript which was used for the edition of 1566. This edition Dewez used as a fundament for his 1793 edition, except some chapters he thought spurious. He added readings he had found in the Manuscript and made numerous corrections 'partim Mspti mei ope, partim propria meditatione & judicio'. (p. IX) In the notes on the last 31 pages he gives an account of his choices and his judgement. He judged the Latin translation of the 1566 edition to be so rubbish (confusione, barbarie, infidelitate, imperfecta) that he decided to make an new and better translation into Latin. (est versio ita perspicua & distincta, ut legere quilibet Moschionem, & intelligere, ex eoque fructrum capere possit' (p. X)) (Collation: A-R8 (minus leaf R8, R7 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130443 Euro 375,00
MUSAEUS. MOUSAIOU TOU GRAMMATIKOU TA KATH' HÊRÔ KAI LEANDRON. Musaei Grammatici De Herone et Leandro carmen. Cum scholiis graecis nunc primum e codice MS. Bibliothecae Bodlejanae editis. Ex recensione Matthiae Röver, qui variantes lectiones et notas adjecit. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Theodorum Haak, 1737. 4to. Frontispiece, XLIV,101,(26 index) p. Vellum 21 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,608: 'Abdruck des Textes von Kromayer mit wenigen Veränderungen; unter dem Texte jedoch befinden sich Varr. aus 7 Handschriften und 17 Ausgaben'. Brunet 3,1958; Dibdin 2,240; Moss 2,312; Ebert 14562) (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints; short title in ink on the back; frontispiece designed and engraved by F. van Bleijswijk, depicting a drowned Leander washed ashore, and Hero, just before she hits the ground, after having jumped from the tower; the title features the engraving of 2 ancient coins, which depict a swimming Leander and Hero with her torch on a tower. In the preface Röver gives an assessment of previous editions, and a list of the manuscripts and editions he used. The Greek text is accompanied by an opposing Latin translation, on the lower part of the page are printed the scholia. At the end have been added 3 Latin verse translations) (Condition: Vellum age-toned and slightly spotted; paper slightly yellowing at the edges) (Note: The Greek poet Musaeus (Musaios), middle 5th century A.D., wrote an epyllion of 343 hexameters, the only surviving full narrative of the love story of Hero and Leander. It is about young Leander, who lived in Abydos, a town on the borders of the Hellespont (the Dardanelles) and who fell in love with Hero, a priestress of Aphrodite, who's home was in Sestos, a town at the opposite side. His parents rejected his feelings, but he nevertheless swam every night ca. 5 km to Sestos to meet his love. She lit a lamp at the top of the tower in which she lived, to guide him. One stormy night the flame was extinguished, and the young man drowned. When his body was washed ashore Hero jumped in despair from the tower. The story of this couple is a typical ancient love romance. It borrows elements from the ancient novels of Chariton, Achilles Tatius and Nonnus. The form is that of an alexandrian love elegy. This story was known to Vergil (Georg. 3,258/63). In his Heroides, no. 18 & 19, Ovid has them exchange love letters. From the 15th century Hero and Leander form a famous love couple in European art and literature. The first great Spanish mythological poem, by Juan Boscán Almogáver, of 1541, is about this love affair. The English poet Marlow made this theme popular during the Elizabethan renaissance. The 'Sturm und Drang' period honours them as examples of fidelity till death. This couple inspired composers, and painters like Rubens and Turner. The young Dutch scholar Matthias Röver, 1719-1803, published his edition of Musaeus when he was only 18. Two years later he published the first complete Greek and Latin edition the 'Tractatus de manumissionibus' (E. Hulshoff Pol, Studia Ruhnkeniana', Leiden, 1953, p. 89, note 13). After his studies at Leyden he practiced as a solicitor for 3 years. He then returned to Delft, his native city, where he became a scholarly recluse for the rest of his life, expanding his knowledge and corresponding with famous scholars. His activities however bore no fruit. He left a huge library. (Van der Aa, 15, p. 515/16) Nevertheless, Dibdin is full of praise for Röver, and observes that this Musaeus edition 'exhibited strong proofs of critical skill and correct judgment'. Röver used for his edition 7 manuscripts and 17 earlier editions. In the preface he thanks Abraham Gronovius, 1695-1775, later in life librarian of the University of Leiden, for offering him the collation and readings of 3 manuscripts from the Bodleian in Oxford which had been collated by his father Jacobus Gronovius, 1645-1716, professor of Greek at Leyden, and he thanks Jacobus Philippus d'Orville, 1690-1751, professor of eloquentia of the 'Athenaeum Illustre' at Amsterdam, for his readings and collations of a manuscript from an ancient Vatican and of a Venitian manuscript. The scholia, which are printed here for the first time, were once copied in the Bodleian by Jacobus Gronovius. (page 2*3 recto). Röver tells on page 5* recto and verso of the preface that he has added 3 other excellent verse translations, one of Andreas Papius Gandensis, one of Q. Septimius Florens Christianus, who was once praised by J.J. Scaliger for his proficiency in Greek, Latin and French poetry, and the one made by David Whitford, which surpasses both others ('qui priores carminis elegantia & facilitate longe superat'). (Collation: pi1 (frontispiece), *-5*4, 6*2; A-Q4 (leaf Q4 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130350 Euro 280,00
NEPOS,C. Cornelii Nepotis Vitae excellentium Imperatorum, observationibus ac notis commentatorum, quotquot hactenus innotuere, illustratae. Accesserunt huic editioni praecipuorum Graeciae Imperatorum icones aeri incisae; ut & index rerum & verborum praecedenti multo auctior & emendatior. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Ex Typographia P. & J. Blaeu, 1687. 8vo. (XXXII, including frontispiece),439,(XL),(1 blank) p. Vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 101005326; Schweiger 2,299; Dibdin 2,245; Moss 2,319/20; Fabricius/Ernesti I,105: 'quae locupletissima est editio'; Graesse 2,270; Ebert 5262; Spoelder p. 593, Harderwijk 1) (Details: Nice prize binding, without the prize. 6 thongs laced through both joints. Back gilt. Boards with gilt double fillet borders, and corner pieces; coat of arms of Harderwijk on both boards. Engraved frontispiece, executed by J. Visscher, depicting Clio with a pen in her hand, she receives advice from Kronos, who holds his scythe, Fama blows her trumpet. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting a celestial sphere, that is flanked by Hercules and Tempus; motto 'Indefessus agendo'. Small engraved portraits/illustrations on 12 p.) (Condition: Prize gone. Vellum age-toned. Some small spots on the upper board. Gilt on the covers almost completely worn away. All four ties gone) (Note: This is an edition with commentary of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., 'De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium'. He is the author of the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. 'De excellentibus etc.' contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. Nepos corresponded with Cicero and was close with Cicero's friend Atticus. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's Vitae Parallelae. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus, included him in his 'De viris illustribus' (392 A.D.) in the list of great authors and historians. Already in late antiquity this collection was ascribed to the grammarian Aemilius Probus, and the 'editio princeps' of 1471 bears his (Probus') name. The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. The biographies provided the pupils also models of behaviour. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. This edition is a socalled 'Variorum' edition, an edition which contained everthing a student required. Such an edition offers the 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Such an edition was published in 1658 in Leiden by the Hackius brothers. It was produced by the young Dutch scholar R. Keuchenius (1636-1673), who matriculated in 1654, and was later in life appointed professor of Roman History at the 'Athenaeum Illustre' of Amsterdam. The edition of 1654 was revised and augmented by an anonymous editor, and published in 1675 by the same Hackius brothers. The preface of Keuchenius to the edition of 1658 (and the testimonia) was repeated, but now anonymously. The anonymous editor seems to be Keuchenius, for the main body of his work and his own notes have been preserved. In a short 'ad lectorem' (signed 'Keuchenius' in 1658, anonymous in 1675) the editor explains that he based his edition on those of Lambinus and Longolius, and that he passim added selected observations of Gifanius, Savarus, Schottus, Boeclerus, Gebhardus, Ernesti and Bosius. He also eludicated the Lives with passages from ancient Greek historians, like Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon and Plutarch. The edition of 1675 became the model of a line of clones, including the frontispiece and illustrations. It was reprinted verbatim, line by line, page by page, with the same layout and the same kind of typeface by the Blaeu brothers in 1687, probably Mortier in 1704, by Janssonius van Waesberge in 1705, by Samuel Luchtmans in 1728. The frontispiece and the illustrations of the 1687 edition are however no copies, but they are exactly the same as in the edition of 1675. Blaeu had perhaps come into the possession of the plates which belonged to the edition of 1675 after the death of Cornelius Hackius in 1668, and used them for this 1687 edition. He also might have hired them) (Collation: *-2*8; A-2G8 (leaf 2G8 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130140 Euro 300,00
NEPOS,C. Cornelii Nepotis Vitae excellentium Imperatorum, observationibus & notis commentatorum omnium quotquot hactenus innotuere, illustratae. Accesserunt huic editioni praecipuorum Graeciae Imperatorum Icones aeri incisae; ut & index rerum & verborum auctior & emendatior. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Samuelem Luchtmans, 1728. 8vo. (XXXII),439,(40 index),(1 blank) p. 19th century half calf 19 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 303349565; Schweiger 2,300; cf. Dibdin 2,245; cf. Moss 2,319; Ebert 5262; Graesse 2,270) (Details: Back gilt. Engraved frontispiece (dated 1704), executed by J. Visscher, depicting Clio with a pen in her hand, she receives advice from Kronos, who holds his scythe, Fama blows her trumpet. Title in red and black. Small engravings of portraits and objects in the text on 11 pages) (Condition: Back rubbed. Corners somewhat bumped. Small stain in the blank margin of the frontispiece. Paper yellowing) (Note: This is an edition with commentary of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., 'De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium'. It is the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. 'De excellentibus etc.' contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. Nepos corresponded with Cicero and was close with Cicero's friend Atticus. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's 'Vitae Parallelae'. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus, included him in his 'De viris illustribus' (392 A.D.) in his list of great authors and historians. Already in late antiquity this collection was ascribed to the grammarian Aemilius Probus, and the 'editio princeps' of 1471 bears his name. The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. The biographies provided the pupils also models of behaviour. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. This edition is a socalled 'Variorum' edition, an edition which contained everthing a student required. Such an edition offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Such an edition was published in 1658 in Leiden by the Hackius brothers. It was produced by the young Dutch scholar R. Keuchenius (1636-1673), who matriculated in 1654, and was later in life appointed professor of Roman History of the 'Athenaeum Illustre' at Amsterdam. The edition of 1654 was revised and augmented by an anonymous editor, and published in 1675 by the same Hackius brothers. The preface of Keuchenius to the edition of 1658 (and the testimonia) was repeated, but now anonymously. The anonymous editor seems to be Keuchenius, for the main body of his work and his own notes have been preserved. In a short 'ad lectorem' (Keuchenius in 1658, anonymous in 1675) the editor explains that he based his edition on those of Lambinus and Longolius, and that he 'passim' added selected observations of Gifanius, Savarus, Schottus, Boeclerus, Gebhardus, Ernesti and Bosius. He also eludicated the Lives with passages from ancient Greek historians, like Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon and Plutarch. The edition of 1675 became the model of a line of clones, including the frontispiece and illustrations. It was reprinted verbatim, line by line, page by page, with the same layout and the same kind of typeface by the Blaeu brothers in 1687, probably Mortier in 1704, by Janssonius van Waesberge in 1705, by Samuel Luchtmans in 1728. There is however something strange with the titlepage of 1728. The chain-lines run horizontal in stead of vertical, which proves that this titlepage was inserted. After examination of the fingerprints we must conclude that our copy is the edition of 1705 which was published in Amsterdam by Janssonius van Waesberge, Boom and Goethals, and which was adorned with a frontispiece dated a year earlier, 1704. So, Luchtmans must have bought the remainder of the 1705 edition and only replaced the titlepage. This explains the presence of a 1704 frontispiece in a 1728 edition. It is clear that for the printing of this frontispiece the copper plate of the 1675 edition was used) (Collation: *8 (leaf *2 inserted, horizontal chainlines), **8, A-2G8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130269 Euro 150,00
NEPOS,C. Cornelius Nepos, perperam vulgo Aemilius Probus dictus, De vita excellentium Imperatorum. Diesen giebt nach Art seines Plinii und Horatii mit auserlesenen philologischen, moralischen u. historischen Anmerckungen, auf eine ganz neue nützliche und leichte Weise, nebst einer Vorrede und dienlichen Registern heraus M. Caspar Gottschling, Siles., Neustadt-Brandenb. Rect. und Bibliothec. Brandenburg, Zu finden bey Johann Ernst Wohlfelden, Buchhändlern. Gedruckt bey Christian Hallen, Kön. Preuss. privil. Buchh, 1729. 8vo. (XLVIII, including frontispiece),624 p. Vellum 17.5 cm (Ref: Not in Schweiger, Brunet, Ebert, Graesse; not yet in VD18) (Details: Nice copy. 5 thongs laced through both joints. Short title in ink on the frontcover. Frontispiece by Daniel Fincke, depicting the historian Nepos at work, while Mars and Athena keep guard. Title in red and black. Latin text on the upper half, and German commentary on the lower half of the page. Good quality paper) (Condition: Vellum somewhat soiled. Small stamp and a name on the verso of the frontispiece. Front flyleaf renewed) (Note: This is an edition with an accompanying commentary in German, of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium. It is the first collection of biographies from antiquity. It contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. An ancient editor added to this collection the lives of M. Porcius Cato, and of Pomponius Atticus, the friend and correspondent of Cicero. Already in late antiquity this collection was ascribed to the grammarian Aemilius Probus, and the editio princeps of 1471 bears his name. In his edition of 1569 the French classical scholar Dionysius Lambinus proved on stylistic grounds that this work must have been written by the contemporary of Cicero, Cornelius Nepos alone. Later editions often mention both names, and combine the names of the authors with vel, seu,sive, or vulgo. § The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. The German scholar and historian Caspar Gottschling, 1679-1739, is the author of a great number of publications. He used many pseudonymes, among which Carolus de Gaule, or Charles de Gaule. Since 1710 he was Rektor of the Gymnasium of Neustadt Brandenburg. Best known are his editions of the school authors Nepos, Pliny, Cicero and Horace. In 1717 he published in Halle his German translation of Nepos. This was followed by his edition of Nepos with a commentary in German. Wellknown is also his contribution to the Land of Cockaigne legend, Der Staat von Schlaraffenland which he published in 1710. (See for Gottschling Handbuch Gelehrtenkultur der Frühen Neuzeit, Bln., 2001, p. 310/11)) (Provenance: Small oval stamp of Döllinger and the manuscript name of Döllinger, dated 1874, on the verso of the frontispiece. This is Johann Joseph Ignaz von Döllinger, 1799 - 1890, who 'was a German theologian, Catholic priest and church historian who rejected the dogma of papal infallibility. He is considered an important contributor to the doctrine, growth and development of the Old Catholic Church, though he himself never joined that denomination'. He was educated in the gymnasium at Würzburg, and then began to study natural philosophy at the University of Würzburg, where his father held a professorship. In 1826 became professor of theology at the University of Munich, where he spent the rest of his life. (See for Döllinger his long Wikipedia German article) Döllinger loved Nepos. He once told about his Gymnasium time: I simply adored Nepos, and glowed with enthusiasm for Mithrydates, Marcus Aurelius, Homer, Sophocles, and a host of others. Even now, by way of a treat, I read Greek before I go to bed, and sometimes in the morning. And when I take my evening walk in the English Garden, I go over the Greek tragedies to myself, and find them excellent company. And when asked for his enthousiasm for the English General Gordon, the late governor-general of the Soudan, whom he thought a figure of heroic proportions, (...) Second to none in moral grandeur, and worthy to be placed by the side of Bismarck and of Moltke, Döllinger asked rhetorically: Take for instance the case of boys reading Homer or Nepos through for the first time. Do you mean to tell me that they (German youths) no longer have any feeling of enthusiasm for the heroes of these great works ?' (Conversations of Dr. Döllinger, London 1892, p. 173 and 174) These conversations took place 12 years earlier in the English Garden in Munich. This famous Englisher Garten still exists and has its own Wikipedia article) (Collation: a-c8, A-2Q8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120479 Euro 375,00
NEPOS. Cornelii Nepotis Vitae excellentium Imperatorum, observationibus & notis commentatorum omnium, quotquot hactenus innotuere, illustratae. Accesserunt huic editioni praecipuorum Graeciae Imperatorum icones aeri incisae; ut & index rerum & verborum auctior & emendatior. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Prostant apud Wetstenios, 1707. 8vo. (XXXII, including frontispiece),439,(XL index),(1 blank) p. Modern half calf 19 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,299; Dibdin 2,245; Moss 2,319/20; Fabricius/Ernesti I,105: quae locupletissima est editio) (Details: Engraved frontispiece, executed by J. Visscher, depicting Clio with a pen in her hand, she receives advice from Kronos, who holds his scythe, Fama blows her trumpet. Small engraved illustrations on 12 p.) (Condition: Name on the blank margin of the frontispiece. Oval stamp on the title. Paper yellowing) (Note: This is an edition with commentary of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium. He is the author of the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. De excellentibus etc. contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. § Nepos corresponded with Cicero and was close with Cicero's friend Atticus. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's Vitae Parallelae. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus, included him in his De viris illustribus (392 A.D.) in his list of great authors and historians. Already in late antiquity this collection was ascribed to the grammarian Aemilius Probus, and the editio princeps of 1471 bears his name. § The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. The biographies provided the pupils also models of behaviour. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. This edition is a socalled Variorum edition, an edition which contained everthing a student required. Such an edition offers the textus receptus which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, cum notis Variorum, were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Such an edition was published in 1658 in Leiden by the Hackius brothers. It was produced by the young Dutch scholar R. Keuchenius (1636-1673), who matriculated in 1654, and was later in life appointed professor of Roman History of the Athenaeum Illustre at Amsterdam. The edition of 1654 was revised and augmented by an anonymous editor, and published in 1675 by the same Hackius brothers. The preface of Keuchenius to the edition of 1658 (and the testimonia) was repeated, but now anonymously. The anonymous editor seems to be Keuchenius, for the main body of his work and his own notes have been preserved. In a short ad lectorem (Keuchenius in 1658, and anonymous in 1675) the editor explains that he based his edition on those of Lambinus and Longolius, and that he passim added selected observations of Gifanius, Savarus, Schottus, Boeclerus, Gebhardus, Ernesti and Bosius. He also eludicated the Lives with passages from ancient Greek historians, like Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon and Plutarch. The edition of 1675 became the model of a line of clones, including the frontispiece and illustrations. It was reprinted verbatim, line by line, page by page, with the same layout and the same kind of typeface by the Blaeu brothers in 1687, probably Mortier in 1704, by Janssonius van Waesberge in 1705, by Wetstein in 1707 (this edition), and by Samuel Luchtmans in 1728) (Provenance: On the frontispiece: B.L.W. Mensing. Between In the second half of the 19th century B.L.W. Mensing exploited a boarding school in Schoonoord, an estate in the Dutch city of Rijswijk. (See Wikipedia, Buitenplaats Schoonoord. § On the title the stamp of: Huize Katwijk, De Breul, Zeist. This school still exists, and is now called Katholieke Scholengemeenschap De Breul. (See Wikipedia) The school was established as a boarding school in 1831 in Katwijk aan den Rijn, and was in 1842 transfered to the Jesuits. The school moved to The Hague in 1928, then to Noordwijkerhout in 1941, and finally in1946 to De Breul, an estate between Zeist and Driebergen) (Collation: *-2*8; A-2G8 (leaf 2G8 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152704 Euro 150,00
NEPOS. Cornelii Nepotis Vitae excellentium imperatorum, cum integris notis Jani Gebhardi, Henr. Ernestii & Jo. Andreae Bosii. Et selectis Andreae Schotti, Dionysii Lambini, Gilberti Longolii, Hieronymi Magii, Jo. Savaronis, aliorumque Doctorum; necnon Excerptis P. Danielis. Hisce accedit locupletissimus omnium vocabulorum index, studio & opera Jo. Andr. Bosii confectus, curante Augustino Van Staveren, qui & suas notas addidit. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Samuelem Luchtmans, 1734. (XVI including frontispiece),765,(187) p. Half calf 21.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,300/1; Dibdin 2,246; Moss 2,320; Ernesti/Fabricius I,107: 'Optima hodie et nitidissima est') (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands; black morocco shield in the second compartment; covers marbled; margins preserved uncut; frontispiece, executed by J. Visscher, depicting Clio with a pen in her hand, receiving advice from Kronos, scythe at hand, Fama blows her trumpet; title in red and black; printer's mark on title, depicting Athena, motto: 'Tuta sub Aegide Pallas'; small engravings of portraits and objects in the text on 11 pages) (Condition: Head and tail of spine damaged; cover rubbed and scuffed; small library label on the frontcover; half of front flyleaf cut off vertically; flyleaf in the rear gone; 12 gatherings are somewhat browning) (Note: This is an edition with commentary of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., 'De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium'. He is the author of the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. 'De excellentibus etc.' contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. Nepos corresponded with Cicero and was close with Cicero's friend Atticus. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's Vitae Parallelae. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus, included him in his 'De viris illustribus' (392 A.D.) in his list of great authors and historians. Already in late antiquity this collection was ascribed to the grammarian Aemilius Probus, and the 'editio princeps' of 1471 bears his name. The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. The biographies provided the pupils also models of behaviour. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. This edition is a socalled Variorum edition, an edition which contained everthing a student required. Such an edition offers the 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. The Dutch schoolmaster who skillfully excerpted, compared and contrasted the material of brighter minds is Augstinus van Staveren, 1704-1772. He was rector of the schola latina at Leiden since 1750. He is known for this edition of Nepos, which saw several later editions, and his 'Auctores Mythographi Latini', which was published in 1742. The frontispiece, or rather the copper plate for this frontispiece and the text engravings which belong to this edition, have a long history. The same plates were used for almost 150 years by different publishing firms. The plates were first used for by Hackius edition of 1658 and then the reissue of 1675. The next users were the Blaeu brothers, in 1687, thereupon probably Mortier, in 1704 (not seen by us), then Janssonius van Waesberge in 1705, and then by Samuel Luchtmans, who seems the last owner, in 1728. Luchtmans used the plates in 1734 again for his new edition of Van Staveren, next for the second edition of 1773, and finally for the 'editio minor' of Van Staveren, which was published in 1793) (Collation: *- 2*8, A-3N8, 3O4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130342 Euro 150,00
NEPOS. Cornelius Nepos. De Excellentibus Viris, notis perpetuis ex Longolio, Lambino, Schotto, Boeclero, Buchnero, Bosio, Cellario, aliisque, ad modum Johannis Minellii illustratus. Adjecta sunt ejusdem Fragmenta collecta ab Schotto, et index selectissimus. Editio altera. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Joannem Haffman, 1746. 8vo. (XVI),411,(36 index),(1 blank) p. Vellum 16 cm (Ref: Not in Schweiger) (Details: Five thongs laced through both joints. Title in red & black. Engraved printer's device on the title, depicting Hermes and Athena, between them the fountain struck by Pegasus, it's motto: 'Ex hoc fonte licet cuique levare sitim') (Condition: Vellum soiled. 'Nepos' in curly ink letters on both boards. Some old ink annotations in the margins) (Note: This is a school edition with notes of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium, also known as De excellentibus Viris. This very well preserverd schoolbook was produced after the manner of the Dutch schoolmaster Johannes Minellius, an industrious and successfull compiler of schoolbooks. He published the works of several classical authors with ample notes which were easy to understand by young schoolboys who were still inexperienced in Latin, or just lazy. Minellius, or Min-ellius, born ca. 1625, was educated at the Schola Erasmiana at Rotterdam, and was from 1650 onward till his death in 1683 a Praeceptor at that school. Minellius' schoolbooks with accompanying annotations were a tremendous success. In 1653 he published his first, Sallustius, then Valerius Maximus in 1661, Florus in 1664, Terence in 1665, Vergil in 1666, Horace in 1668 and Ovid in 1684. His books were reissued many times, and his manner was followed by schoolmasters all over Europe, who wanted to participate in his success and who produced school-editions ad modum Joanni Minellii. At the end of the 17th and in the 18th century his editions were widely used on Dutch grammar schools. After that they were barred from the schools because they were too unscientific, and offered too much help. They were esteemed to be pontes asinorum (Van der Aa 12,2 p. 873). Minellius never published a Nepos edition. The printer/bookseller of this Nepos nevertheless announces on the very first page of the Lectori that this is an edition cum notis Minellii. In the following preface the anonymous compiler however eases off the pedal, and explains that Minellius never touched Nepos, but that the publisher asked him to make a Nepos secundum ejusdem institutum. § Cornelius Nepos is the author of the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. De excellentibus etc. contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. Nepos corresponded with Cicero and was close with Cicero's friend Atticus. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's Vitae Parallelae. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus included him in his De viris illustribus (392 A.D.) in his list of great authors and historians) (Collation: *8, A-2E8 (leaf 2E8 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120369 Euro 110,00
NEPOS. Cornelii Nepotis Vitae excellentium Imperatorum, cum notis selelectis Boecleri, Bosii, Buchneri, Ernestii, Gebhardi, Heidmanni, Lambini, Loccenii, Longolii, Magii, Ravii, Savaronis, Schefferi, Schotti, nec non excerptis P. Danielis. Hisce accedit locupletissimus omnium vocabulorum, index, studio & opera J.A. Bosii. Suas notas addidit Augustinus van Staveren. Editio altera, longe auctior. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Sam. et Joan. Luchtmans, 1773. 8vo. (XXXII, including frontispiece),832,(176, index) p.; text-illustrations on 11 p. Vellum 22 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 238342476; Schweiger 2,302: 'vielfach verbesserte und bereicherte Ausgabe'; Dibdin 2,246: 'a very elaborate edition', 'It is in great repute'; Moss 2,320; cf. Ernesti/Fabricius I,107; Ebert 5273; Brunet 2,289; Spoelder p. 490, Amsterdam 9) (Details: Prize copy, including the printed prize. Back gilt. 6 thongs laced through both joints. Boards with gilt borders, gilt corner pieces and the gilt coat of arms of Amsterdam. Engraved frontispiece (dated 1794), executed by J. Visscher. Engraved printer's mark on the title, depicting Athena, motto: 'Tuta sub Aegide Pallas'. Small text engravings (portraits, illustrations) on 11 p.) (Condition: Vellum soiled. All 4 ties gone. Excellent paper) (Note: This is an edition with commentary of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., 'De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium'. He is the author of the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. 'De excellentibus etc.' contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's 'Vitae Parallelae'. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus, included him in his 'De viris illustribus' (392 A.D.) in his list of great authors and historians. Already in late antiquity this collection was ascribed to the grammarian Aemilius Probus, and the 'editio princeps' of 1471 bears his (Probus') name. The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. The biographies provided the pupils also models of behaviour. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. This edition is a socalled 'Variorum' edition, an edition which contained everthing a student required. Such an edition offers the 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. The Dutch schoolmaster who skillfully excerpted, compared and contrasted the material of brighter minds is in this case Augstinus van Staveren, 1704-1772, who was rector of the 'schola latina' at Leiden since 1750. Nevertheless he proudly announces in the preface that he also has consulted in his search for 'variantes lectiones' 4 manuscripts of the Library of the University of Leiden, and the collations of 2 English manuscripts. This second edition of Van Staveren's Nepos was published posthumously. In the short 'dedicatio' to the second edition, written by Carolus Antonius Wetstenius J.C., we read that Van Staveren, who was already halfway, asked him, short before his death to complete the second corrected and augmented edition. Van Staveren, whom he calls 'vir amicissimus' was once his teacher, Westein tells us. Van Staveren had already skipped 'quaedam, suaque non pauca', to prevent the book from being too overloaded. Van Staveren is known for this edition of Nepos, which saw several later reissues, and for his 'Auctores Mythographi Latini', which was published in 1742. Not much is known of Carolus Antonius Wetstein, 1742-1797. He was a Leyden lawyer and also an accomplished Neolatin poet. (Van der Aa 20,159) The bibliographers donot mention his involvement in the editing of his teacher's Nepos. The frontispiece, or rather the copper plate for this frontispiece, has a story of almost 150 years. It was first used in 1658, then 1675, 1687, 1704 (?), 1705, 1728, 1734, this book of 1773, and finally in 1793) (Provenance: The prize is for Henricus Oort: 'Ingenuo optimaeque spei adolescentulo Henrico Oort. Hoc virtutis ac diligentiae praemium in classe sexta nova decreverunt Ampliss. Dd. Coss. & Scholarchae Amstelaedamenses'. It is signed by the Rector R. van Ommeren, 29th of March, 1793. Young Henricus Oort, 1778-1849, received this book also for his diligence. That is what he was, diligent. He took holy orders in the 'Nederlandsch Hervormde Kerk' and worked tirelessly for his church. He was also a diligent member of all kind of Societies. (Van der Aa, 14,142)) (Collation: *-2*8, A-3R8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130139 Euro 200,00
NEPOS. Cornelii Nepotis vitae excellentium imperatorum, quorumdam iconibus ornatae, et nonnullis animadversionibus partim criticis, partim historicis inlustratae ab Augustino van Staveren. Editio altera. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud S. et J. Luchtmans, 1793. 12mo. (XIV including frontispiece),434, (72) p.; 7 small engraved portraits in the text. Later half calf 12.5 cm (Ref: cf. Schweiger 2,302; cf Brunet 2,289) (Details: Back ruled blind and gilt. Marbled endpapers. Frontispiece, depicting Clio with a pen in her hand, she receives advice from Kronos, who holds a scythe, a winged Fama blows her trumpet. Seven small engraved portraits in the text) (Condition: Binding scuffed. Some pencil notes. Lower margin of the title cut short, with loss of part of the impressum) (Note: This is an edition with commentary of the only surviving complete work of the Roman historian Cornelius Nepos, ca. 100-24 B.C., 'De excellentibus ducibus exterrarum gentium', the first surviving ancient collection of biographies. 'De excellentibus etc.' contains the lives of 20 Greek generals, and the Carthaginians Hamilkar and Hannibal. Nepos corresponded with Cicero and was close with Cicero's friend Atticus. The collection served probably as a model for Plutarch's Vitae Parallelae. In his own days and in late antiquity Nepos was considered to be a source of importance. The churchfather Hieronymus, included him as great historian in his 'De viris illustribus' (392 A.D.). The simple style of writing of Nepos has made him a standard choice for schools. The biographies provided the pupils also models of behaviour. Schweiger mentions numerous editions. This edition was compiled by the Dutch schoolmaster Augustinus van Staveren, 1704-1772, who was appointed in 1750 Rector of the Schola Latina at Leyden. He produced during his career two editions of Nepos, a learned 'editio maior', a stout octavo of 765 p. 'cum notis Variorum suisque', which was first published in 1734 (second edition 1773). In 1755 he produced at the request of the publishing firm Luchtmans an 'editio minor', a small but thick duodecimo 'cum notis A. van Staveren'. The first one, of 1734, is a socalled 'Variorum' edition. Such editions' offer usually the 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Van Staveren's 'editio minor' of 1755 was repeated in 1793. The minor edition left out the learned commentaries, but offered a revised text accompanied by critical and historical notes of Van Staveren, which often contain material found by him in Greek sources. (Van der Aa, 17,2 p. 966/67) The frontispiece and the engravings in the text have a long history. The copper plates for them were first used in 1658. They were used again in editions of 1675, 1687, 1704 (?), 1705, 1728, 1734, 1773 and finally here in 1793) (Provenance: in pencil on the verso of the front flyleaf: 'A. Roozendaal, 1944'. We found one 'A. Roozendaal, Amersfoort' in the tabula gratulatoria of the Festschrift 'Studia varia Carolo Guilielmo Vollgraff a discipulis oblata', Amsterdam 1948, p. 194. After we had found this, a small receipt ticket of a restaurant in Amersfoort, dated 20/3/55, fell out of this book; at the back a note on Van Staveren, apparantly made the same Roozendaal, now an elderly person; A. Roozendaal was probably a student of C.W. Vollgraff, professor of Greek and Archaeology of the University at Utrecht. Vollgraff died in 1967, 91 years old) (Collation: *8 (minus *8)(including frontispiece), A-X12 Y1) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120280 Euro 750,00
NICETAS CHONIATES. Della Historia di Niceta Coniate delle cose dell'Imperio di Costantinopoli libri VII. Ne' quali si contengono i fatti degl'Imperatori Greci, cominciando da Alesio Comneno doue lascia il Zonara, fin 'all'anno 1557 nel qual su presa quella Città da Mahomet Secondo. Con le postille a suoi luoghi dinotanti le cose di maggiore importanza, et con molte altre cose utili & necessarie a Lettori. Venice (In Venetia), (Colophon at the end: Appresso Francesco Sansovino, 1562) 4to. 4 unnumbered leaves, 111 leaves. Vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 2,634; Edit17 CNCE 31070) (Details: 2 vellum thongs laced through the joints at the head & tail of the spine; short title in ink on the back; woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting a man lying on his back, looking at the washing moon high in the sky; the text is printed in italics; woodcut headpiece at the beginning of the dedication, preface and translation; woodcut initials) (Condition: Vellum soiled; cover slightly damaged at the extremities; a few pinpoint wormholes in the back; small piece of vellum gone at the right outer edge of the frontcover; lacking the last blank leaf; both pastedowns worn; right upper corner of last flyleaf torn off) (Note: The Byzantine historian Niketas Choniates (Nikêtas Chôniates), ca. 1155-1216, was born in Chonai (Phrygia, Asia Minor, and present day Khonas), hence his name Choniates, 'from Chonai'. He joined his older brother Michael in Constantinople, where he embarked upon a political career, and became an important civil servant. As governor of Thrace he was personally involved in the events relating to Frederick Barbarossa's passage through Thrace during the Third Cusade in 1189, when he lost his province to the Germans. After the capture of Constantinople and 3 of days of terrible and bloody looting by the Crusaders, who were helped by the Venetians, (13-15 April 1204) Niketas sought refuge in the home of a friend, the Venetian wine merchant Dominicus, who came to his rescue. Although a desperate refugee he was a brave man. 'As Niketas' party approached the Church of St. Mokios, one of the Crusaders snatched the fair-headed daughter of a certain judge. Stumbling into a mudhole in despair, the venerable judge pleaded with Niketas to save his daughter. To Niketas' credit, in the face of great personal danger, he persued the abductor and forced him to release the girl by appealing to his fellow Crusaders' . ('O City of Byzantium, Annals of Nicetas Choniates', translated by H.J. Magoulias, Detroit, 1984, p. XIV-XV) Niketas fled and went into voluntary exile in Nicaea, where he settled at the court of the Nicaean emperor Theodore I Lascaris. There he completed a theological treatise, the 'Dogmatikê Panoplia', which deals with the theological controversies of his time, in some of which he himself had been involved, and wrote this valuable account of the events of his lifetime. His account, which is said to be impartial, begins with the death of Emperor Alexius I Comnenus in 1118, who left his empire in bankruptcy, and ends with events of autumn 1207. 'The final draft of his history was left undone, and its abrupt ending may have been due to his approaching death, which also may explain his haste to complete it'. (o.c. p. XVI) He considered the Comnenus dynasty a major cause of the empire's destruction and the sack of its capital in 1204. Another chief cause was the deterioration of the Byzantine navy. The Byzantines lost control of the seas to the Venetians. 'One of the historian's (Niketas) most telling criticisms is that the Muslims treated the conquered Latins in Jerusalem in 1187 with magnanimity, while the Christians of the West behaved shamelessly toward their fellow Christians in the East'. (o.c. XXVII) The history of the thallasocracy of Venice is closely connected with the Byzantine Empire. Constantinople twice granted her special trade privileges, and with the Fourth Crusade and the sack of Constantinople this city state became an imperial power, backed by its huge fleet. A considerable part of the loot was shipped to Venice, including the famous bronze horses stolen from the Hippodrome, which came to adorn the entrance of the San Marco Cathedral. With the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 numerous merchants, Jews and Byzantine scholars fled to Venice. It is not strange that 16th century Venice was eager to read about their city's greatness and the collaps of the Byzantine Empire. The editio princeps the 'Historia' of Nicetas was published in Basel by Wolf in 1557. A few years later, in 1562, 3 Venetian translations were published. The first one, this edition of 1562, was obviously a success, for Francesco Sansovino brought in the same year a second augmented edition on the market. His fellow townsman Vincenzo Valgrisi published in 1562 also a translation, this time made by Joseppe Horologgi. (See Hoffmann 2,634) Sansovino, who apparantly considered Choniates' s 'Historia' to be not elegant enough, published in 1562 for his own press his own revision of the not yet published translation of Fausto da Longiano. (Preface *4 recto) At the beginning of each of the 7 books he proudly claims his part in the historiography of Constantinople, for he adds to 'DELLE COSE DELL'IMPERIO DI COSTANTINOPOLI (...) SCRITTE PARTE DA NICETA CONIATE', printed in capitals, in lowercase: '& parte da Francesco Sansovino'. This translation fell on fertile ground in Venice. Interest did not dwindle, for in 1568 and 1571 two other editions appeared, both translations of L. Dolce. The interest of Sansovino in Niketas may have been aroused by his experiences during his own childhood. He was born in Rome in 1521, and witnessed as a child the sack of his city in 1527 by mutinous troops of Charles the 5th. He and his father fled to Venice. Sansovino studied law in Padua and Bologna, and after attempting a career at the court of Pope Julius III, he returned to Venice. He was a many sided author of poetry, prose writings on literature, history and rhetoric, as well as a translator and editor. He opened his own printing house, publishing around 30 editions, many of good quality, between 1560 and 1568. He was widely read during the Renaissance, especially his historical works. His best known work is 'Venetia, città nobilissima et singolare, descritta in XII libri' of 1581, a kind of encyclopedia of the city) (Collation: *4, A-Z4, AA-EE4 (minus leaf EE4, a blank))(Photographs on request)
Book number: 151902 Euro 1100,00
NOLTENIUS,I.F. Ioh. Frid. Noltenii (...) Lexicon latinae linguae antibarbarum quadripartitum, cum adnexa ad calcem recensione scriptorum latinorum critica, iterata hac editione sic ab auctore recognitum, emendatum ac locupletatum ut novum opus videri possit. Accedit praefatio (...) Moshemii. Leipzig, Helmstedt, (Lipsiae et Helmstadii), Apud Christian. Frideric. Weygand, 1744. 8vo. 47,(1) p., 1938 columns, 143 p., frontispiece. Contemporary boards. 22 cm (Ref: (www).uni-mannheim.de/mateo/camenahtdocs/camena.html s.v. Thesaurus, s.v. Nolte; cf. Brunet 4,96; Graesse 4,684; cf. Ebert 14846) (Details: Binding covered with marbled paper. Title in red & black. Frontispiece with a portrait of the proud 'Johannes Fridericus Noltenius Einbeccensis, Ducalis Scholae Scheningensis Con Rector') (Condition: Cover worn at the extremities. Wear at the joints & the head & tail of the spine. Some foxing, paper yellowing) (Note: Johannes Friedrich Nolte, 1694-1747, German lexicographer, (con)rector at Schöningen. He was famous for his 'Lexicon latinae linguae antibarbarum', a dictionary of linguistic barbarisms, describing how not to write in the Latin language, and prescribing how it should be done correctly. The first edition dates from 1730. The famous church historian Johann Lorenz Mosheim published in 1744 a new revised edition. This edition of 1744 is one of the 97 titles of the online 'Thesaurus Eruditionis' (CAMENA, TERMINI) at the University of Mannheim, Germany. The genre of the 'Antibarbarus' was started by the humanists of the Renaissance, to fight the dog Latin and barbarisms of Medieval Latin. Erasmus made the genre popular with his 'Antibarbari' ('Liber Antibarbarorum') of 1520. Having acquired the principal rules, and a competent knowledge of the language, the student was adviced for his grammatical studies to peruse constantly and carefully the works of Cicero, and authors like Terentius, Nepos and Caesar, in order to absorb the structure and idiom of pure Latinity. In support of this grammatical study the student should proceed to the study of works like Noltenius' Lexicon. His Lexicon is an encyclopaedia of philological learning. § The Lexicon consists of 4 parts: 'Pars prima Orthographica; pars secunda Prosodica; pars tertia etymologica; pars quarta syntactica'; after this follows: 'Quattuor linguae latinae aetates earumque scriptores', a survey of 83 p. of the golden, silver, bronze and the iron age of Latin literature; at the end of this part a list of 'Latinitatis restitutores', listing modern editors who devoted their efforts 'ad hoc Augiae stabulum repurgandum'; at the end there are 143 p. filled with 3 indices, an 'index auctorum', an 'index rerum', and an 'index vocabulorum et locutionum') (Provenance: name on front flyleaf, 'N.J. (?) Krom', probably the Dutch classicist and archaeologist Nicolaas Johannes Krom, 1883-1945. (See 'Biografisch Woordenboek van Nederland', online available through 'Biografisch Portaal van Nederland') (Collation: a8 (leaf a8 was placed before leaf a1 to serve as frontispiece); b-c8; A-3Z8, 4A4) (The structure of the first gathering is p1 = a8, the rest signed a1-a7) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130012 Euro 150,00
NOVUM TESTAMENTUM.- ELSNER,JACOBUS. Jacobi Elsner, Observationes sacrae in Novi Foederis libros, quibus plura illorum Librorum loca ex auctoribus potissimum graecis & antiquitate exponuntur & illustrantur. Utrecht (Trajecti ad Rhenum), Apud Jacobum van Poolsum, 1720 - 1728. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XXXII),506,(38 index); XVI,472,(55 index),(1 blank) p. Vellum 20 cm Dedicated to Petrus Burmannus the Elder (Ref: Ebert 6679; 4 copies in STCN; not in Brunet) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints. Title in red & black. Engraved printer's device on the title, its motto is: 'Virtutis gloria merces' (Glory is the reward of valour). Woodcut initials. Author's dedication copy to the Dutch classical scholar Petrus Burmannus (1668-1741) with the dedication written on the verso of the front flyleaf; the signature of Burmannus is on the title) (Condition: Vellum soiled and slightly scratched. Short title in ink on the back. Some slight foxing. Bookplate on both front pastedowns. Old inscription on the front flyleaf of volume 1) (Note: Jacobus Elsner, 1692-1750, went in 1717, after his studies in Königsbergen, to Utrecht and matriculated at the University. He studied biblical hermeneutics, and Greek & Latin literature. There, or in Leyden, he must have met the Dutch classical scholar Petrus Burmannus, professor in Leyden since 1715. (See the provenance below) After his return to Prussia in 1720 Elsner became one of the leading figures in Prussia. From 1720 he taught theology and oriental languages at the academic Gymnasium Lingen. In 1728 the took his doctoral degree in theology at the University of Utrecht. After that he was appointed professor and head of the 'Joachimsthalsche Gymnasium' in Berlin. (ADB 6,68/69) (Provenance: On the verso of the flyleaf a dedicatory inscription of the author: 'Celeberrimo Viro PETRO BURMANNO Humaniarum Litterarum Statori et Vindici hoc perpetuae suae observantiae signum mittit Auctor'. § A charming engraved bookplate on both front pastedowns: 'ex libris bibliothecae domus rectorialis apud Ash in com. Cant. a viro rev. Thoma Lambarde, rectore in usum rectorum legate A.D. 1811'. It further depicts the charming offical residence of the Reverend Thomas Lambard, Rector of Ash next Ridley, Kent. He died in 1811 at the age of 53. (See for him (www).kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/01/ANR/01/09/110a.htm, page 110/112) § Name on front flyleaf of the Swedish classical scholar Lennart Håkanson) (Collation: *-2*8; A-2L8; *8, A-2K8 (leaf 2K8 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130052 Euro 325,00
OCELLUS. Betrachtungen des Ocellus von Lukanien über die Welt. Aus dem Griechischen in das Französische übersetzt und mit verschiedenen Abhandlungen über die wichtigsten Punkte der Hauptwissenschaft der Naturlehre und der Sittenlehre der Alten, die man als den zweyten Theil der Weltweisheit der gesunden Vernunft ansehen kann, begeleitet von dem Herrn Marquis d'Argens, Seiner königlichen Majestät in Preussen Kammerherrn, Mitglied der königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften und Direktor der philologischen Klasse. Aus dem Französischen des Herrn Marquis in das Deutsche übersetzt. Breslau, Verlegts George Gottlieb Horn, 1763. 8vo. 50,462 p. Restored half vellum 17 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 3,2; Ebert 14990; cf. Brunet 4,151 for the French edition of 1762; not yet in VD18) (Details: The binding is not original, but originating from an other book of approximately the same size. The vellum on the boards seems old, but the leather on the back is recent. The pastedowns are new and marbled, the flyleaves are old, but not original. Greek text with facing German translation, abundant commentary) (Condition: The paper is browning & foxed; title spotted, its margins thumbed. Small hole in the right margin of the title, not reaching text. Right upper corner of 1 leaf torn off, with the loss of some letters at the beginning & end of the first sentence. Some words on 1 page erased with ink. Small hole in the last leaf, resulting in the loss of some letters. Some pencil) (Note: This book is a gesture of friendship. It was produced by Jean Baptiste de Boyer, Marquis d'Argens for his close friend, Frederick the Great, (Friedrich der Grosse) the philosopher/king of Prussia, to give him some comfort in tempestuous times, when it looked as if he stood on the eve of the fall of his kingdom. 1760/61 were years of disaster for Frederick during the Seven Year's war (1756/1763), an 18th century world war between Prussia, Kurhannover and Great Britain against the rest of Europe. In the midst of slaughter the Marquis and Frederick exchanged letters. In a letter of october 1760 (Lettre 88) Frederick seemed desparate. La fin de mes jours est empoissonée', he writes. 'Je n'ai ni secours, ni diversion, ni paix, ni rien au monde à espérer. The end of the letter is gloomy. Adieu, mon cher Marquis, ne m'oubliez pas, & soyez tranquille spectateur de ce qu'il plaira à la fatalité, & à la brutale rage de nos ennemis, d'ordonner de nous. (Oeuvres postumes de Frédéric II, Tome XI: Correspondance avec le Marquis d'Argens, Amsterdam, 1789, p. 200) The king meanwhile finds, like the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, comfort in philosophy. Je n'ai de soutien au milieu de tant de contrariétés que ma philosophie; c'est un bâton sur lequel je m'étaie. (Lettre 92, p. 210) In the summer of 1761, when all seemed lost, D'Argens took up his pen and produced for his king this Ocellus edition. 'Ocellus (or Occellus) of Lucania, occurs in Iamblichus' list of Pythagoreans, but the work peri tês tou pantos phuseôs bearing his name and known as early as the first century B.C. is undoubtedly spurious. It shows considerable traces of Aristotelian influence, and may problably be dated about 150 B.C.' (OCD 2nd ed. p. 745) 'Ocellus' Schrift (über das All) soll offenkundig die aristotelische Lehre von der Ewigkeit der Welt und des Menschengeschlechtes mit der Autorität des Pythagoras versehen, vielleicht auch die Abhängigkeit des Aristoteles von letzterem belegen'. (Neue Pauly, vol. 11,1155) § The Frenchman Jean Baptiste de Boyer, Marquis d'Argens, 1704-1771, who edited and translated this text, is still convinced that its author, the philosopher Ocellus, lived in the 6th century B.C. That it might be a forgery doesnot enter his mind. The marquis tells in the preface that it is better to read zu Erlernung der alten Weltweisheit (Pref. p. 10) the concise original works of the ancients than the more wordy new publications, for sie stellen uns die Lehrgebäude der alten Weltweisen nicht in der gehörigen Kürze dar (Pref. p. 10). His translation of, and commentary on Ocellus illustrate, he goes on, themes which he, the Marquis, developed previously. This Ocellus should be considered to be a supplement to the Marquis's Die Philosophie der gesunden Vernunft oder philosophische Betrachtungen über die Ungewissheit der menschlichen Erkäntniss, (Breslau, 1756), a translation into German of his La philosophie du bons-sens, ou réflexions philosophique sur l'incertitude des connoissances humaines (first published 1737), which saw many reissues, and was translated into English, Dutch and Italian. (Pref. p. 10) Ocellus, he tells, lived before Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, and one finds in his work den Grund, worauf die späteren Weltweisen hernach, ihre Lehrgebäude aufgeführet haben. (Pref. p. 11) To prove his point he quotes Plato, Philo Alexandrinus, Lucianus and Stobaeus. Stobaeus, who lived in the 5th century A.D., even wrote a summary of Ocellus' work. He quotes: Ocellus, sagt er (Stobaeus), hält in seinem Buche von der Natur der Welt dafür, dass die Welt ewig sey, und er beweiset theils diese Meinung, theils sucht er auch darzuthun, dass die Bewegung, die Zeit und die Figur der Welt schon von Ewigkeit her mit der Welt zugleich gewesen sind. Denn die Figur der Welt ist zirkulförmig. Ein Zirkul aber ist sich an allen Seiten gleich und ähnlich, und hat also keinen Anfang oder Ende. Die Bewegung ist ebenfalls ewig, denn sie geschiehet in einem Kreis, und kann also eben so wenig als dieser einen Anfang oder Ende haben. Die Zeit is ebenfalls ewig und unendlich, weil dasienige, was bewegt wird, ohne Anfang und Ende ist. Die Natur leidet also niemals einige Veränderung, sie wird weder besser noch schlechter, sondern sie bleibet eben so in alle Ewigkeit, wie sie von Ewigkeit her gewesen ist'. (Pref. p. 19/20) The Marquis proudly tells that his translation is the first one in a modern language. He translates as litteral as possible, he says, but took the liberty to elaborate on some passages of his translation da ich sonst hätte befürchten müssen, das die Uebersetzung vielen Lesern unverständlich würde geworden seyn. (Pref. p. 24) The best earlier edition with Latin translation was according to the Marquis produced by the Englishman Thomas Gale (Amsterdam 1688). (Pref. p. 26) He calls the commentary of the Italian Vizanius (Bologna 1646) worthless. The aim of his own commentary is die vornehmsten Punkte der Gottesgelehrsamkeit, der Naturlehre, und der Sittenlehre zu erörtern, und die Uebereinstimmung oder Verschiedenheit der ältern und neuern Gottesgelehrten und Weltweisen in Absicht derselben zu zeigen. Und ich glaube, das wenn man unpartheyisch die verschiedenen Meinungen der Alten und Neuen von Zeit zu Zeit untersuchen wollte, man daraus eine kurzgefasste Geschichte des menschlichen Verstandes verfertigen könnte'. (Pref. p. 27) § The philosopher and author Jean-Baptiste de Boyer, Marquis d'Argens was a fierce opponent of the Catholic Church, of intollerance and of religious oppression. His books frequently ended up on the Index of forbidden books. His best known work is his Lettres Juives (The Hague, 1738/42). Frederick the Great, king of Prussia, invited him to his court. He appreciated him for his attacks upon orthodox religion. There he remained 25 years, as a friend and advisor of the king. As the title says, D'Argens was Seiner königlichen Majestät in Preussen Kammerherr, (salary 1500 Reichtaler) Mitglied der königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften (in Berlin) und Direktor der philologischen Klasse. At the end of his short lemma in Wikipedia (French) one finds a huge list with his publications. Far more reliable information on D'Argens can be found here: ub-dok.uni-trier.de/argens/bio/bio.htm. D'Argens established relations with the republic of letters in Germany. Especially sein Engagement für den jüdischen Philosophen Moses Mendelssohn ist in der Literaturgeschichte in Erinnerung geblieben. He befriended king Frederick's friend Voltaire mit dem ihn eine zwar zeitweise getrübte, aber doch lebenslange Freundschaft verband. His most influential philosophic work was his Philosophie du bon sens, which wanted to incite mistrust against all authorities. It saw several translations, and 13 editions in the 18th century. This book, Betrachtungen des Ocellus, was published one year earlier, in 1762, in Berlin in French, the original title of which is Ocellus Lucanus en Grec et en Français, avec des dissertations sur les principales questions de la Métaphysique, de la Physique, & de la Morale des anciens, qui peuvent servir de suite à la Philosophie du Bon sens. Chr.A. Klotz praises in his review in the Acta Litteraria, vol. II, pars I (Altenburg, 1765, p. 39/64) the translation of d'Argens. Vidimus Dargensium bene Graecos scriptores e Graeco in Gallicum sermomem vertisse, assecutum esse plerumque feliciter sensum auctorum, (...) explicuisse omnia luculenter, nihilque ad eorum sententias intelligendas pertineret, omisse. (p. 41/42) His commentary is very useful and informative, immortales Dargensio gratias res litteraria deberet. (p. 55). The aim of d'Argens of producing this book, was not purely philologic. He didnot want to produce a scientific text. He is a philosopher of the Enlightenment, who tries to convince his readers with the help of the ideas of an ancient philosopher that morality is possible without a God. He is an opponent of the religious metaphysics of the German precursor of the Aufklärung, the philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. § From the correspondence between D'Argens and king Fredrick the Great in the years 1761/62 we learn something about the aim of this book and the motives for its creation. In a letter to Frederick dated 3 november 1761 (lettre 121) D'Argens announced his translation to Frederick. J'ai discontinué depuis de deux mois ma traduction de Plutarque, que je reprendrai bientôt, & j'ai employé ce temps à traduire le plus ancient philosophe Grec qui nous reste, appelé Ocellus Lucanus; il a fait un ouvrage sur la nécessité de l'éternité du monde; il vivoit long-temps avant Socrate, Platon, Aristote, &c. Son ouvrage est court, mais excellent; j'y ai joint, sous le prétexte d'éclaircir le texte, plusieurs dissertations qui ne feront pas rire les ennemis des philosophes'. (Oeuvres postumes de Frédéric II, Tome XI: Correspondance avec le Marquis d'Argens, Amsterdam, 1789, p. 272/73) Six weeks later (lettre 123, 24 december 1761) the Marquis explains Frederick that the Ocellus edition, with his translation and his dissertations, was not produced for the scholarly world. His Majesty will see que je n'ai pas fait la sauce pour le poisson, mais que j'a cuit le poisson pour avoir le prétexte de faire la sauce. Passez-moi, Sire, ce mauvais proverbe, parce qu'il explique bien l'idée que j'ai eue en traduisant Ocellus'. (Correspondance avec le Marquis de'Argens, p. 277/78) From letter 122 it appears that D'Argens has sent to the king in the mean time the preface to his new book. He produced the Ocellus, he tells the king almost one year later (lettre 176, October 1762), to vent his gal (la bile que nos ennemis me faisoient faire) about infamous libels with attacks upon the philosophers (Voltaire, D'Argens et alii) and their maecenas at Sans-Souci, king Frederick. J'ai composé celles (dissertations) sur Ocellus pour répondre indirectement à trente libelles qu'on publioit en Allemagne & en France contre les philosophes, & cela pour en revenir toujours à celui de Sans-Souci & à ceux qu'il honoroit de ses bontés'. (Correspondance avec le Marquis de'Argens, p. 385) D'Argens refers to books like L'Anti-Sans-Souci, ou la folie des nouveaux philosophes, which was published in 'Bouillon' in 1761. This libel targeted the entourage of the king, people like Voltaire, La Mettrie and D'Argens, and indirectly the king himself. We have seen that D'Argens found it his duty to lay aside his work on Plutarch, and to support his king in this tempestuous year of 1761, by attacking Frederick's ennemies, who rejoiced in his misfortunes. That the king was very pleased with the gesture of D'Argens, is proved by the fact that Frederick offered a deluxe gift copy of the French edition of 1762, bound in red morocco leather, to his reader (Vorleser) Henri Alexandre de Catt. It is one of the rare known gift copies of Frederick. The anecdote connected with this gift is too striking to omit. Möchlicherweise hat der König das Buch kurz nach dem Tod der Zarin Elisabeth (5. Januar 1762) seinem Vorleser de Catt geschenkt. Als der König Ende 1761 die Meldung erhielt, dass die Zarin schwer erkrankt sei, sagte er zu de Catt: 'Sie werden sehen, dass sie nicht stirbt, und dass ich gegen das Unwetter weiter ankämpfen muss. Ich gehe eine Wette ein, dass sie wieder gesund wird'. De Catt war anderer Ansicht. Sie schlossen eine Wette ab und der König versprach seinem Vorleser für den Fall, dass er verlieren sollte, ein Geschenk. This was the best and most important bet Frederick ever lost. We quote from Wikipedia's lemma Seven Year's War: 'Britain now threatened to withdraw its subsidies if Prussia didn't seriously consider offering to make concessions to secure peace. As the Prussian armies had dwindled to just 60.000 men Frederick's survival was severely threatened. Then on 5 January 1762 the Russian Empress Elizabeth died. Her Prussophile successor Peter III, at once recalled Russian armies from Berlin (...) This turn of events has become known as the 'miracle of the House of Brandenburg'. A photo of this gift copy, and the anecdote can be found on: (www).die-buecher-des-koenigs.de/pdf/Friedrich_20120111.pdf. This very gift copy was auctioned in 2010 by Jeschke van Vliet Buch- und Kunstauktionen. The price was 11408 Euro. The German version of 1763 of this book is very rare. We found in KVK a few copies in German libraries, one in a French, and one in an Austrian library. One copy was auctioned in 1974 (JAP, Jahrbuch der Auktionspreise, vol. XXV) (Collation: a-c8 d1; A8 (minus blank leaf A8) B-2F8. (nothing missing between A and B, all is regular)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120532 Euro 490,00
ORIGENES. ÔRIGENÊS KATA KELSOU EN TOMOIS Ê'. tou autou PHILOKALIA. Origenis Contra Celsum libri octo; eiusdem Philocalia. Gulielmus Spencerus, Cantabrigiensis, Collegii Trinitatis Socius, utriusque operis versionem recognovit, & annotationes adjecit. Accedunt item notae Davidis Hoeschelii in octo libros Origenis, una cum notis Jo. Tarini in Philocalia. Cum indice rerum & verborum locupletissimo. Cambridge (Cantabrigiae), Excudebat Joan. Hayes, celeberrimae Academiae Typographus, impensis Guli. Morden Bibliopolae, 1677. 4to. (X),428; (2 blank), (6),110,(2),98; 38 (index) p. Contemporary calf 23.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 3,23; Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, p. 421; cf. Dibdin 1,190, about Spencer's edition of 1658, calls the notes of Spencer learned and ingenious'; Ebert, 15216; Graesse 5,46; Brunet, 4,228/29) (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands. Shield in the second compartment. Title printed in red and black. Woodcut initials. Printed in 2 columns, Greek text with opposing Latin translation. At the end 98 pages commentary) (Condition : Back rubbed, corners bumped; joints partly split. Two small faint stains on the title. Old ownership entry on the front flyleaf. Pinpoint wormhole in the right lower corner always far from the text. Some old clear and legible scholarly ink notes in the beginning. Paper slightly yellowing) (Note: The Greek theologian Origenes Adamantius, 184/185-254/55 AD, was without doubt the greatest scholar of the Church in its first three centuries. His 'writings were voluminous and their range wide, but only a small proportion has survived. He was a pioneer in textual criticism of the Bible, in exegesis, and in systematic theology'. (OCD 2nd edition p. 757) In fact, Origenes did not write, he produced texts. 'Es standen ihm nämlich, berichtet Eusebius (Hist. eccl. 6,23,2) wenn er diktierte mehr als sieben Stenographen zu Gebote (...), ferner ebenso viele Buchschreiber (...) samt Mädchen, die im Schönschreiben geübt waren'. (Bardenhewer, 'Geschichte der altkirchlichen Literatur', 2nd ed., Freiburg, 1914, p. 98) His apologetic work 'Contra Celsum' in 8 books survives in its entirety in many manuscripts. In it Origen attacks, after half a century, the first comprehensive polemic against Christianity, called the Alêthês logos', written ca. 180 AD by the Neoplatonic philosopher Celsus. Celsus's attack was an elaborate indictment of Christianity. The response of Origenes is considered to be the ultimate apology of Christianity. The Philokalia is a collection of excerpts from Origenes's works. 'It preserves the original text of many passages known otherwise only in Latin translation'. (OCD, ibidem) During the 1660s and 1670s Origenes enjoyed a renaissance in England. He was important in the theology of 'Cambridge Platonism'. He was called by some the 'miracle of the christian world', but his championship was regarded however with suspicion by the Restoration church establishment, that dreaded the revival of the heterodox Origenes. The Restoration was critical about Origenes's doctrine of the pre-existence of the soul. In this climate William Spencer, Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, of whom little is known, produced in 1658 his first edition of Contra Celsum. After the dedication follows a preface 'sur les controverses origénistes et les jugements portés sur Origène; notice de Jêrome sur Origène dans VirrIll (IV/V) en latin et en grec'. (Crouzel, Bibliographie critique d'Origène, p. 109) Spencer adopted and improved for his edition Origenes's eight books against Celsus, the Latin translation made by the Czech humanist and Greek scholar Sigismund Gelenius, which had appeared for the first time in a revised Origenes edition of Erasmus of 1557. It was reprinted in 1605 in Augsburg with Gelenius's notes by the German scholar David Hoeschelius. Spencer took over Hoeschel's notes too in his edition of 1658, reappearing here in this second edition 1677. Spencer adopted also the text of the 'editio princeps' of the Philokalia (Paris, 1618) and its accompanying Latin translation of the French scholar Jean Tarin, 1585-1666, who taught Latin at the Collège de France. At the end of the book are 98 pages with the notes on the 'Contra Celsum' of Spencer, followed by 28 pages notes of Hoeschel and Tarin) (Provenance: On the recto side of the first blank leaf an inscription: 'Ex libris Gasparis Rohleri (Rolleri ?) sacerdotis Senonensis 5a Augusti anno 1726'. Who this priest of the diocese of Sens (East of Paris) was, we could not find out. The marginal notes in the beginning of the text were probably made by him. From the Rostagni Library. 'The Rostagni private library has been built over a time of 133 years, between 1880 and 2013, by 3 generations of collectors: Augusto Gabinio (1863-1939), internist, his nephew Augusto Rostagni (1892-1961), classical philologist at the University of Turin, and his son Luigi Rostagni (1932), Operational Director. (...) Augusto Rostagni thaught Ancient literature in various Italian Universities. In 1928 he was appointed professor in Latin literature at the University of Turin, an office he fulfilled until his death in 1961. He became one of Italy's most authorative philologists of the 20th century. He held positions of President of the Turin Institute of Classical Philology, Dean of the Department of Literature and Philosophy, Editor of the Rivista di Filologia Classica, President of the 'Accademia delle Scienze di Torino'. He was a well-known member of many Italian and foreign academies and institutions, amongst them the Accademia dei Lincei. The Department of Philology, Linguistics & Classical Tradition of the University of Turin is named after him.' (Burgersdijk & Niermans, Auction sale 340, Leiden, 2014, p.68) ) (Collation: A4 (minus 1 leaf), a2; B-4S4 (leaf 3I3 blank; minus leaves 4S3 & 4S4, on the verso of 4S2 a stocklist of 'W. Morden, bookseller in Cambridge'. The first gathering 'A' seems to consist of a blank leaf A1, then the title, followed by A3 (both connected by the watermark), and at the end an unsigned leaf. These 4 leaves are followed by a 2 leaf gathering 'a', which brings the total of preliminary leaves to 6 (12 pages). These preliminary pages are described in other copies we found as having 10 pages, not including or recognizing the blank A1) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152320 Euro 400,00
OROSIUS. Pauli Orosii presbyteri Hispani Adversus paganos historiarum libri septem, ut et Apologeticus contra Pelagium de arbitrii libertate. Ad fidem MSS. et praesertim cod. Longob. antiquiss., Bibliothecae Florentinae Mediceae S. Laurentii, adjectis integris notis Franc. Fabricii Marcodurani et Lud. Lautii, recensuit suisque animadversionibus nummisque antiquis plurimis illustravit Sigebertus Havercampus. Leiden (Lugdini Batavorum), Apud Gerardum Potvliet, 1738. 4to. (XXXVIII),634,(30) p. Calf 25.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,622: 'Neue Recens. der Geschichtsbücher nach 11 Hdschr. u. älteren Ausgg.'; Schoenemann p. 502/3: 'quae ad Historiae illustrationem spectant docte ubique apposita sunt, ut nihil ex hac parte desiderari possit'; Brunet 4,237: 'Édition la meilleure que l'on ait de cet auteur, elle est peu commune et très recherchée'; Ebert 12256) (Details: Back ruled gilt, and with 5 raised bands, & with a red morocco letterpiece in the second compartment; title in red & black, and with an engraved numismatic vignet: both sides of a coin of Caesar Augustus; numismatic text engravings on about 100 p.) (Condition: Head & tail of spine gone; front joint cracked and hanging on 3 bands. Rear joint cracking; covers scratched; corners bumped; paper partly somewhat browning; endpapers foxed) (Note: Paulus Orosius, 5th century A.D., was a priest from Portugal. Fled before the Vandals he became a pupil of Augustine. It is on his instigation that Orosius wrote his 'Historia adversus Paganos', the first Christian universal history, from the creation of the world to the founding and history of Rome until A.D. 417. His pagan sources for Roman history were Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius, Justinus and Eutropius. We see here the course of history through the eyes of his master Augustine, who asked Orosius to write a historiographic 'supplement' to his 'City of God'. The work was apologetic, and attacked the pagan complaint that Rome's troubles were caused by her abandonment of the pagan Gods. He proved that there were sufferings before the rise of Christianity. 'Ego initium miseriae hominum ab initio peccati hominis docere (ducere) institui', he tells the reader in the first chapter, and wanted to demonstrate that the sufferings of humanity diminished since Christ. The History was widely read in the Middle Ages. (NP 9,53/4). An edition of this work was produced by the Dutch scholar Siegbert Havercamp, 1684/174, since 1721 professor of Greek at Leiden University. Schoenemann praises Havercamp because he offered also the praefationes of worthy predecessors. Havercamp included the complete commentary on the Historiae of Franz Fabricius of Düren, (also called Marcoduranus) 1527-1572. He studied in Paris under Ramus and Turnebus, and published much on Cicero. His Orosius edition dates from 1561. (Sandys 2,268, and ADB 6,507). Havercamp also incorporated the commentary of Ludovicus Lautius, a Flemish priest, who's commentary was published in 1615 in Mainz. (Van der Aa 11,214) (Provenance: in the right margin of the title a small oval embossed ownership stamp of the 'Free Church College Library Glasgow' ) (Collation: +-2+4, *-3*4 (minus leaf 3*4), A-4O4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140107 Euro 250,00
OVIDIUS. Pub. Ovidii Nasonis Opera omnia, in tres tomos divisa. Ex accuratissma recensione Nicol. Heinsii, cum notis selectissimis Variorum, in omnes ejusdem libros; & figuris aeneis artificiosissimis, singulis libris Metamorphoseôn praefixis, argumenta eorundem indicantibus. Cum indicibus locupletissimis tum rerum, tum verborum. Editio nitidissima, accuratissima, accurante Cornelio Schrevelio. Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Petrum Leffen, 1661 - 1662. 8vo. 4 volumes in 3: XXII,667,(16 index); VIII,832,(35 index);XVI,400,(31 index);492,(11 index) p., frontispiece and a portrait in vol. 1. 2 engraved titles, 15 engraved plates. Overlapping vellum. 20.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,630; Dibdin 2,267/8; Ebert 15367) (Details: 6 Thongs laced through covers; woodcut printer's device on 2 titles: a Phoenix on a banner, reading 'Ex morte immortalitas'. 2 parts have engraved titles. Frontispiece, the portrait of Ovid, the engraved titles and the plates at the beginning of each book of the Metamorphoses are made by P. Philip) (Condition: Covers slightly soiled and spotted; 2 bookplates on front pastedown of the first 2 vols.; the gatherings v and x of the last volume have erroneously been switched by the binder; some slight foxing) (Note: Noot Ovidius, Variorum, Schrevelius (A so-called Variorum edition; a very popular genre. By some such editions were called dustbins full obsolete information, by others 'Fundgruben', compiled by scholars who knew their Latin far better than later generations)) (Provenance: Engraved bookplates of: 'Richard Clark Esq. Chamberlain of London', with his coat of arms; and of: 'Richard Caulfield L.L.D. Fellow Soc. Antiq. London Corresp. Member Soc. Antiq. Normandy; Cork'; small label of B.H. Blackwell Ldt. Booksellers Oxford on front flyleaf of vol. 2 & 3. Richard Clark (1792-1831) was Chamberlain of London, that is, he was the Finance director of the City of London from 1798 till his death; He was also Lord Mayor (1784-1785). Richard Caulfield (1823-1887) was a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, London, and Membre Corresp. de la Soc. Antiq. de Normandie, and of the Royal Academy of History of Madrid, Librarian of Queen's College, Cork, and Hon. Sec. Royal Historical and Archaeological Assoc. of Ireland.) (Collation: 1: *8 (including a frontispiece and a portrait), 2*4 (minus leaf 2*4); A-2S8, 2T6 (minus leaf 2T6), 2V8, 2X2 (minus leaf 2X2) 2: *4, A-3F8, 3G4, 3H8, 3I8 (leaves 3I7 & 3I8 blank) 3: *8 (including engraved title), A-2C8, 2D-2E4 (leaf 2E4 blank) 4: A-2H8, 2I4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130352 Euro 375,00
OVIDIUS. Publii Ovidii Nasonis Metamorphoseôn libri XV. Cum annotationibus posthumis J. Min-Ellii, quas magna ex parte supplevit atque emendavit P. Rabus. Rotterdam, typis Regneri Leers, 1697. 12mo. (XVI),621,(9 index) p. Half calf 14 cm (Ref: Schweiger 631, for an edition 'edente Rabo' and Schweiger 650; cf. Graesse 5,70 (edititon 1697) and 76 (edition 1710)) (Details: Back gilt, and with a red morocco shield; a frontispiece depicting scenes from the Metamorphoses; woodcut printer's mark on title: 'Pressa resurget'; edges dyed red) (Condition: Cover worn at the extremes; back rubbed; paper on cover chafed; upper corner leaf Y1 repaired with some loss of text) (Note: This is a school edition of Metamorphoses of Ovid by the Dutch poet and classical scholar Pieter Rabus, 1660-1702. In 1686 the Curatores of the Erasmianum at Rotterdam appointed him praeceptor. He remained there till his death. He translated Erasmus, Sulpicius Severus into Dutch, and works of Christiaan Huygens into Latin. For the Erasmianum he produced an edition of the Metamorphoses, after the taste of Minellius and Farnabius. (Van der Aa, 16, 22/24). 'Tyronibus enim scripsi', says Rabus, 'non veteranis, secutus, ut debui, exemplum Min-ellii.' (Praefatio, page *3). On the same page Rabus tells us that he used for this edition also the notes of Johannes Minellius, ca. 1625-1670, one of his predecessors,who himself, educated at the Erasmianum, had been a Praeceptor at the school until his death. Minellius or Min-ellius produced several editions of classical authors with ample annotations, easy to understand. His first school edition of Ovid was published in 1686 in Rotterdam. At the end of the 17th and in the 18th century his editions were widely used on Dutch grammar schools. After that they were barred from the schools because they were too unscientific, and offered too much help. They were esteemed to be 'pontes asinorum'. § The Metamophoseôn libri with the notes of Minellius were first published by Rabus in 1686. The edition was a great success. It was reissued in the Netherlands in 1697, 1710, 1722, 1729 and 1735, and in Copenhagen in 1736 and 1766. In Germany in 1701 and 1710; the German classicist J.G. Walch produced an edition of the Metamorphoses 'ad modum Min-ellii', published in 1731. Most Minellius (revised) reissues of the Metamorphoses appeared throughout the 18th century in England, these editions were called 'Minellius Anglicanus', with Minellius' notes in English, 1724, 1733, 1741, 1756, 1770, 1778, 1787 & 1795. This is for instance the title of the English edition of 1756: 'Ovid's metamorphoses, in fifteen books. With the arguments and notes of John Minellius translated into English. To which is marginally added, a prose version; viz. The very words of Ovid, digested into the proper order in construing; by the asistance of which young scholars, of but a very small acquaintance with the rules of grammar, may be enabled of themselves, with ease and pleasure, to learn their lessons without interruption to the teacher. For the use of schools. By Nathan Bailey, author of the Universal, etymological, English dictionary') (Collation: *8 (including the frontispiece) A-2C12, 2D4 (minus the blank leaf 2D4)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120286 Euro 180,00
OVIDIUS. Alle de werken van Publ. Ovidius Naso. In de Nederlandse taale overgebracht door Abraham Valentyn. Met verklaaringen, en uitleggingen verrijkt door Lud. Smids M.D. En met omtrent 300 printverbeeldingen door de vermaarde Le Clerc geteekent, &c. Amsterdam (Amsteldam), By Pieter Mortier, Boekverkooper, 1700 - 1701. 4to. 3 volumes. (X),289; (VIII),440; (VIII),334,(40 index) p., numerous engravings in the text; 3 frontispieces; 1 portrait of Ovid; 26 & 1 engraved plates. Vellum 24.5 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 122,26,b; OiN 273) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints; the frontispieces are made by J. Goeree and J. van Vianen; ad volume 1: the frontispiece depicts a royal woman at her desk, writing or reading a letter, probably Dido; small engraved portrait of Ovid on the first title, and a full page portrait of him after the preliminary leaves; ad volume 2: the frontispiece depicts probably Ovid about to enter the temple of the Muses; he is welcomed by Apollo; ad volume 3: the frontispiece depicts Ovid in despair being send into exile by the emperor Augustus; engraved plates of gods & goddesses and the like in the translation of the Fasti. Ca. 300 small engravings in the text of all 3 volumes) (Condition: Vellum age toned and very slightly soiled & stained; front flyleaf of 2nd and 3rd volume partly removed; paper partly yellowing) (Note: This book contains a Dutch prose translation of the works of the Roman poet Ovid, 43 B.C. - 17 A.D, who 'is perhaps the most consistently influential and popular writer of the classical tradition. His central position is suggested by the many surviving manuscripts of his works and their early publication in printed editions. (...) Most would agree that it is his Metamorphoses that has had the greatest influence, but his other major poems, the Heroides, Tristia, Fasti, and particularly his racier works, the Amores, Ars amatoria, and Remedia amoris, have played their part in maintaining his reputation as a writer of enduring importance and appeal.' (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass. 2010, p. 667) The huge number of editions and translations suggests that Ovid's appeal lies also beyond the bounderies of the scholarly world. The editor and annotator of this work, Ludolf Smids, confesses in the preface of the first volume that he thinks that his readers probably know little Latin. In the preface of the 2nd volume (the Metamorphoses), he is more precise about his public. There he states that everyone has read this 'weergaloos Konstwerk' (inimitable work of art) thoroughly. Painters, sculptors, and engravers draw on this famous source for inspiration. 'Want wie (buiten de Letterkundige) beroemd sich niet de Metamorphosis door en door geleesen te hebben, aangesien sy is de rijke schatkamer en het volgepropte wapenhuys van Schilders, Beeldhouwers en Graveerders, die niet ontkennen hunne Ifigeniaas, Medeaas, Nioben, Altheën, en andere wonderstukken, deselve ontleend te hebben'. In the preface of the last volume Smids declares once more that he did not publish the translation and did not write his annotations for scholars and the like (Hoofd-leeraaren en Letterwijsen), but for painters, sculptors, engravers and draughtsmen, and for young students (jonge Leerlingen van Taalen en Weetenschappen). The dates of the translator Abraham Valentijn are unknown. He was living in the Dutch town of Dordrecht, at least since 1666, where he first was praeceptor (teacher of classical languages) of the local Schola Latina, and later Conrector. His Ovid translation was first published in Leiden 1678, and was reprinted twice. He also published a prose translation of Juvenal, which had some success, for it was reprinted several times. (Van der Aa 19,24) More is known about the editor and annotator of this translation Ludolf Smids, 1649-1720. He came to Leiden, where he became Doctor of Medicin in 1673. He went to live in Amsterdam, where he spent more time on the study of history, antiquities, poetry and numismatics than as medical practioner. He wrote plays, poetry, and several books on numismatics. He also translated the Mostellaria of Plautus into Dutch. (Van der Aa, 17/2, 760) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf in ink: 'M. Tydeman 1811 Oct.' Mr. Meindert Tydeman, 1741-1825, was librarian since 1811 of the University Library of Leyden, and in 1814 he was appointed professor of philosophy)(Collation: Volume 1: pi2 (including frontispiece), *2, chi1 (portrait); A - Z4, Aa - Nn4, Oo2 (minus leaf Oo2) (Full page engraving on p. 112 = leaf O4 verso) Volume 2: pi2 (including frontispiece), *2; A - Z4, Aa - Zz4, Aaa - Iii4. Volume 3: pi2 (including frontispiece), *2, A - Z4, Aa - Zz4, Aaa4 (minus Aaa4) (26 plates at page 146, 154, 157, 160, 164, 177, 179, 181, 198, 215, 220, 223, 227, 241, 243, 261, 262, 264, 268, 278, 281, 283, 285, 296, 305 & 307) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151909 Euro 900,00
OVIDIUS. P. Ovidii Nasonis Heroides, in literarum studiosae juventutis usum, cum Variorum et suis adnotationibus edidit W. Terpstra, Gymnasii Erasmiani Rector. Indices adjecit J. Terpstra, ejusdem Gymnasii Praeceptor. Leiden (Ludgduni Batavorum), Apud S. et J. Luchtmans, 1829. 8vo. 20,644 p. H.calf 21.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 640; Spoelder p. 509/10) (Details: Prize copy of the Latijnsche School at Assen, including the manuscript prize. Back gilt with floral motives, and with a red morocco shield; paper of covers marbled) (Condition: Cover very slightly worn at the extremities) (Note: ) (Provenance: The prize was awarded by the Curators of the 'Scholarum Assanarum' to Georgius Ludolphus Wolterus Kijmmell for the promotion from the 5th to the 4th grade. The prize, dated 19 July 1833, is signed by the founder and rector of the 'Latijnsche School' of Assen in 1825, Dr. H.J. Nassau. Kijmmell, or Kymmell was a member of the provincial aristocracy of Drenthe. The family was very influential there in the 18th and 19th century) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130362 Euro 90,00
PACATUS, DREPANIUS. Latini Pacati Drepanii Panegyricus. Cum notis integris Claudii Puteani, Francisci Jureti, Joannis Livineji, Valentini Acidalii, Conradi Rittershusii, Jani Gruteri, Joannis Schefferi, Christiani Gotlibi Schwarzii. Aliorumque selectis. Quibus adcedunt Thomae Wopkensii animadversiones criticae nunc primum editae, curante Joanne Arntzenio JCto, qui & suas adnotationes adjecit. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud viduam & filium S. Schouten, 1753. 4to. (VIII),XV,(1 blank),178,(34 index) p. New plain wrapper. 25.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 701; Brunet 4,303; Ebert 15616; 10 copies in STCN) (Details: Title in red & black; engraving on the title: a scholar at work in his library, on his desk lie a number of coins. His fee?) (Condition: Tasteless brown paper wrapper. First and last leaf browning; remains of a paper label near right upper corner of first flyleaf; this book deserves a real binding) (Note: Pacatus Drepanius, ca. 400, was a rhetor originating from the region of Bordeaux. He became Proconsul of Africa, and was befriended with Ausonius, Symmachus, and probably Paulinus of Nola. His panegyric to the emperor Theodosius I dates from 389 or 391. Pacatus Drepanius composed this work when he was sent by Gallienus to Rome to congratulate the emperor Theodosius. Theodosius is here 'humanitas' personified, and the bearer of old republican virtues. Nevertheless this is an important source for the events of that time. The Dutch scholar Johannes Arntzenius had experience with panegyrics and late Latin. In 1733 he edited Aurelius Victor, and in 1738 he produced an edition of the Panegyricus of Pliny the Younger. Arntzenius was born in 1702 and died in 1759 in Franeker, where he was professor of Eloquentia and Historia since 1743. In the praefatio Arntzenius says that he used the collations of a manuscript from the Library of Wolfenbüttel made by Cl. Cortius. He also thanks Thomas Wopkens for sending him his notes full of educational knowledge. Wopkens, 1700-1755, was an anabaptist minister at Harlingen since 1729. Eckstein erroneously describes him as rector of the Schola Latina at Harlingen. He was evidently versed in Latin. In 1730 he published a collection of much cited notes on Cicero, and in 1761 notes of his hand were published in an edition of the Christian poet Sedulius. (NNBW 10,1236/7, Eckstein 626) (Collation: ò4, 2* - 3*4, 4*2 (minus leaf 4*2), A - 2C4, 2D2) Photographs on request.
Book number: 140015 Euro 80,00
PALAEPHATUS. Palaephati De incredibilibus, graece sextum edidit ad fidem cod. MS. Mosquensis aliorumque et libri Aldini, denuo recensuit emendavit explicavit indicemque verborum graecorum copiosissimum adiecit Ioh. Frider. Fischerus. Accessere Prolusiones quatuor in Palaephati fabulas una cum orationibus duabus. Leipzig (Lipsiae), Sumtu Caspari Fritschii, 1789. 8vo. LXXIV,200,(173 indices)(1);115,(5 index) p. Half calf 21 cm (Ref: VD18 VD18 11355840; Brunet 4,312; Hoffmann 3,36, and also p. 38 for the 'Prolusiones' by J.F. Fischer; Schweiger 1,221; Graesse 5,103; Ebert 15647; this type of prize copy with only 'Diligentiae praemium' on the back is not mentioned in Spoelder) (Details: Prize copy of the Gymnasium Leiden, including the printed prize. Back gilt; gilt text on the back: 'Diligentiae praemium'. Marbled covers and endpapers. Edges also marbled. Small paper label on the front pastedown reading: 'Boekwinkel en boekbinderij van P. Engels, Nieuwsteeg 710 te Leyden'. Somewhat foxed) (Condition: Cover scuffed. Marbled paper on covers loosening from the leather strip) (Note: The mythographer Palaiphatos, in Latin Palaephatus, (probably a pseudonym, 'spoken long ago', or 'of old fame', a poetical adjective already found in Homer and Pindar) might be a contemporary of Aristotle. He probably dates from the second half of the fourth century B.C. Of his work we possess only a short abstract, probably composed in the Byzantine age (9th century) under the title 'On Incredible Tales'. In 52 chapters he rationalizes myths in a peripatetic way. Every myth departs from a reality, which is obscured by poets and storytellers. Palaephatus offers a historical and rational explanation. This is how the treats e.g. the abduction of princes Europa in chapter 15, eliminating the metamorphosis of Zeus and minimizing his role: 'They say that Europa, the daughter of Phoenix, was carried across the sea on the back of a bull from Tyre to Crete. But in my opinion neither a bull nor a horse would traverse so great an expanse of open water, nor would a girl climb upon the back of a wild bull. As for Zeus - if he wanted Europa to go to Crete - he would have found a better way for her travel. Here is the truth. There was a man from Cnossus by the name of Taurus who was making war on the territory of Tyre. He ended up by carrying off from Tyre quite a number of girls, including the king's daughter Europa. So people said: 'Bull has gone off with Europa, the king's daughter'. It was from this that the myth was fashioned'. ('On Unbelievable Tales, translation, introduction and commentary by J. Stern', Wauconda, 1996, p. 46/47) § The collection became a favourite mythological manual in late byzantine times. The author was probably also appreciated for debunking Greek pagan stories. From its first edition in 1505 the text enjoyed also in Western Europe a on-going popularity as a schoolbook. Palaephatus was thought a proper text to learn the rudiments of ancient Greek and at the same time the fundamentals of ancient myth. § The German classical scholar Johann Friedrich Fischer, born in 1726, studied at the University of Leipzig. In 1751 he was appointed Konrektor of the Thomasschule at Leipzig, and in 1767 Rektor, which he remained till the end of his days in 1799. In 1762 he became also 'professor extraordinarius' of Latin and Greek literature at the University. In 1761 Fischer published at Leipzig his first edition of Palaephatus. The work was evidently a success. He produced 6 editions, each one more complete and exhaustive than its precursor. This is the last one. After the text of Palaephatus, accompanied by exhaustive commentary, we find 4 'Prolusiones' of Fischer on the text, a kind of appendices, in which he explains difficulties concerning the text of Palaephatus. At the end are printed 2 'orationes' of Fischer: his inaugural lecture 'Oratio de Ioachimo Camerario grammatico pariter atque theologo excellente Lipsiae' held in 1762 on the occasion of his appointment of 'Professor extraordinarius' of ancient literature; and his lecture held on occasion of his appointment as Rector of the Thomasschule in 1767) (Provenance: The prize, dated 1840, and signed by J.J. de Gelder, was awarded to 'Paulus Claudius Lezwijn' for his diligence, and his love for Greek literature. Paulus Claudius Lezwijn, of Huguenot origin, was a prominent citizen of Leiden. In 1846 his 'dissertatio juridica' was published. Lezwijn was a leading member of the 'Waalse Kerk' at Leiden. He was also a member of a national commission for the investigation of the conditions of child labour ca. 1860) (Collation: a-d8, e6 (minus leaf e6); A-Z8, Aa4 (minus blank leaf Aa4, Aa3 verso blank) (A)-(G)8, (H)4 ) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130414 Euro 360,00
PETRARCA. Francisci Petrarchae poëtae oratorisque clarissimi, De remediis utriusque Fortunae, libri duo. Ejusdem De contemptu Mundi colloquiorum liber, quem Secretum suum inscripsit. Editio nova ac melior. Cum indicibus duobus, altero Dialogorum, altero Rerum. Rotterdam (Roterodami), Ex officina Arnoldi Leers, 1649. 12mo. (XXXVI),824,(26) (2 blank) p. Overlapping vellum 14 cm (Ref: Brunet 4,567) (Details: Woodcut printer's mark on the title, the motto reads 'Labore et Vigilantia'. It depicts a woman, Vigilantia, holding an open book in her left hand and an oil lamp in her right. At her feet a crane. The element 'labor' is represented by a ploughing farmer in the background. Leers used 8 different versions of this mark) (Condition: Short title in ink on the back; in smaller and fading type has been written on the frontcover 'Sc. et Fort'. Bookplate on front pastedown; ownership entry on front flyleaf; stamp on the verso of this flyleaf, and 2 stamps on the title) (Note: Petrarca, 1304-1374, is of course known as the father of the Renaissance and for his Italian poetry, still most of his writings were in Latin. His 'De remediis utriusque fortunae' is a collection of 254 Latin dialogues. 'The dialogues, completed towards the end of Petrarch's life, are treasure-chests of wisdom and humour which, despite the passing of six centuries, have not lost their relevance. They display remarkably lucid ideas that are cogently expressed. Drawing on classical sources, Petrarch expounded on refinement in taste and intellect, on finesse and propriety in speech and style. The writing is a bouquet of moral philosophy, set out to show how thought and deed can generate happiness on the one hand, or sorrow and disillusionment on the other. In a recurring theme throughout the dialogues, Petrarch advises humility in prosperity and fortitude in adversity'. (Wikipedia). Petrarca's model was Boetius' 'De philosophiae Consolatione'. At the end of our edition is printed the 'Secretum', or 'My Secret', a dialogue between Petrarca and the Church Father Augustinus, which may considered to be an attempt to reconcile his Renaissance humanism with his christian faith. The 'De remediis' is preceded by a short biography. This biography contains a bibliographic riddle: leaf **2 recto of the preliminary pages, repeats partly in smaller type part of the text of the preceding p. *12 verso) (Provenance: This book is linked three times to the French city Lyon. The oval armorial stamp on the title, 'Ex bibliotheca J. Richard M.D.' belongs to Jacques Richard, 1744-1812, M.D (Medicus Doctor). 'Il fit ses études à Paris, où il fut reçu docteur en chirurgie. Il exerça à Montbard, Avignon, puis à Lyon. Sa bibliothèque fut vendue aux enchères en 1812'. (Source: 'Numelyo - bibliothèque numérique de Lyon', 'Collections', 'Provenance des livres anciens'). In an obituary published on the 10th of March 1812 in the 'Journal de Lyon' we read that this learned medicin spoke Latin fluently. The bookplate on the front pastedown, 'Ex libris Joannis-Baptistae Marduel, ad S. Nicetium Lugdunensem Vicarii', belonged to Jean-Baptiste Marduel, 1762-1848, who was one of the most enthusiast book collectors in Lyon at the beginning of the 19th century. From 1803 he worked as 'premier vicaire' at Saint-Nizier, one of the main churches in Lyon. His private library, which filled the whole presbytery, consisted of 13 to 14000 volumes. In 1836 he sold his collection to two religious orders for a symbolic price, and on the condition that they would never sell them. (P. Woetmann Chistoffersen, 'French Music in the early sixteenth century', Copenhagen, 1994, p. 10/12) A small oval stamp, 'Domus Lugdunensis S(ocietatis)' indicates the next owner, the order of the Jesuits at Lyon. The order was banished again in France in 1880, and had to close its schools and institutions. § On the front flyleaf in ink the name of an earlier owner: 'Bartholomaeus B. Cromhout, Ao 1662, Octob.' Part of Cromhouts library was auctioned in 1703, in which year was published in Amsterdam: 'Bibliotheca Cromhoutiana sive Catalogus Elegantissimus, Rarissimorum and Curiosissimorum omnis Generis Librorum, Quos Magno studio collegit & pulcherrime compingi curavit Vir Nobilis & Generosus, D. Bartholomaeus Cromhout, P.M., Quorum Publica auctio habebitur Amstelodami, ad diem Lunae, qui erit 16 Aprilis 1703'. It numbered 785, 581 & 748 items. A few years earlier Van Someren published an auction catalogue of 122 pages: 'Praestantissima, & Maximè Curiosa Bibliotheca; Seu Catalogus Exquisitissimorum, In Omni Studiorum & Scientiarum Genere, Librorum; ... Quos ... Collegit ... D: Bartholomaeus Cromhout. P.M: Qui publica auctione distrahentur ... Die 29 Junii ...1699'. Bartholomeus, or Bartholomaeus Cromhout, or Kromhout, was a member of the governing elite of Amsterdam, 1637/38-1695. In 1663 he married Catharina Jacoba van der Wiele van der Werve (†1676), who had inherited a mansion in the Beemster polder, north of Amsterdam. (lot BK4 Kromhout, now Volgerweg 33, see the website 'BeemsterBuitenplaatsen') On the occasion of this marriage the Dutch poet Vondel wrote a poem, 'Ter bruilofte van den E. Heere Bartholomeus Kromhout, en de E. Mejoffer Jakoba van der Wiele, van der Werve'. ('De werken van Vondel. Negende deel, 1660-1663', Amsterdam 1936, p. 795/97). He was a grandson of Barthold Cromhout, who was one of the initiators of the land reclamation of the Beemster) (Collation: *12, 2*6; A - 2M12, 2N6 (leaf 2N6 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151898 Euro 580,00
PHAEDRUS. Phaedri, Aug. liberti, Fabularum Aesopiarum libri V. Cum integris commentariis Marq. Gudii, Conr. Rittershusii, Nic. Rigaltii, Nic. Heinsii, Joan. Schefferi, Jo. Lud. Praschi, & excerptis aliorum. Curante Petro Burmanno. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Henricum Wetstenium, 1698. 8vo. (LVI),462 (recte 572);(54 index in Phaedri fabulas)(58 index rerum & verborum) p., including frontispiece. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 842221344; Schweiger 2,733; Dibdin 2,280; Moss 2,394; Graesse 5,252; Ebert 16587: 'Schätzbare Ausgabe'; Brunet 4,588: 'La meilleure édition') (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints. Title in red & black, and with a woodcut ornament. Frontispiece designed by P. Tiedeman and executed by J. Mulder, depicting Phaedrus with pen on paper while he listens to his Muse; in the background Aesopus surrounded by fable animals. After a long preface follows the Latin text, accompanied by a commentary on the lower half of the page. The pages 201-328 contain the commentary of Gudius, 329-397 of Ritterhusius, and 399-462 of Rigaltius) (Condition: Vellum soiled & spotted. Some slight foxing; right margin of frontispiece thumbed) (Note: The Roman poet Phaedrus, 15 B.C. - ca. 50 A.D., occupies in the history of the fable a very important role. He was a slave of Thracian descent, and became a freedman (libertus) of the first Roman emperor Augustus. He composed 5 books (probably incomplete) of verse fables. His beast-tales are adaptions of the fables of the Greek poet and archfabulist Aesopus,or Aisopos (6th century B.C), and inventions of his own. Phaedrus prides himself to have elevated the fable into an independent genre of literature. Sometimes he satirizes contemporary conditions, and he is always fond of emphasizing the moral of the story. 'The presentation is, in general, animated and marked by a brevity of which Phaedrus is rightly proud, but which sometimes leads to obscurity' (OCD 2nd ed. p. 809). Nevertheless, his style is clear, pure and simple, this in contrast to the swolen rhetoric of his time. He was widely read in the Middle Ages. During the 17th & 18th he was also very much en vogue. Schweiger lists hundreds of editions. Very popular among scholars and students were the Dutch 'Variorum' editions of Phaedrus. This kind of editions offered a 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, and was accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. This 'Variorum edition' was produced by the leading scholar Petrus Burmannus, 1668-1741. He was professor of Latin at the University of Utrecht since 1696, and at Leiden since 1715. As an editor he was an industrious manufacturer of 'Variorum' Editions, confining himself to the Latin classics. He edited besides Phaedrus, Horace, Claudian, Ovid, Lucan, and the Poetae Latini Minores, Petronius, Quintilian, Suetonius. (Sandys 2 p. 343/5). Burmannus tells his readers in the 'praefatio' that the basis for this edition was laid by the German collector of Greek and Latin manuscripts Marquard Gude, or Gudius, 1635-1689. After his immature death his friend J.H. Graevius (1632-1703), professor of the University at Utrecht, gave the not yet published treasure to his young pupil Burmannus to have it published. Graevius himself was too busy, and Burmannus tells that he had plenty of time. The task turned out to be very heavy, for the notes were a mess, (an Augias stable, he says) and partly written in the margins of 4 other Phaedrus editions. He then decided to change his course and to produce edition illustrated with 'Variorum commentariis'. He also included 'notae' on the text of Phaedrus, which the Dutch classical scholar Nicolaas Heinsius, 1620-1681, had left. Moss declares, that this edition of Burmannus 'is held in considerable estimation'. The work was indeed a success. It found several reissues during the next century) (Provenance: on the front flyleaf: 'A. en J. Boon, 1850') (Collation: *-3*8, 4*4, A-Z8 (Z8 blank), a-v8 (gathering a, where the part with the notes starts, begins (again) with page 201) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130148 Euro 190,00
PHAEDRUS. Phaedri Aug. Liberti Fabularum Aesopiarum libri V. Notis illustravit in usum Serenissimi Principis Nassauii David Hoogstratanus. Accedunt ejusdem opera duo indices, quorum prior est omnium verborum, multo quam antehac locupletior, posterior eorum, quae observatu digna in notis occurrunt. Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Ex Typographia Francisci Halmae, 1701. 4to. (XXXII),160; (84) p. Frontispiece, folding plate with portrait, 18 plates. Half calf. 26 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,733; Dibdin 2,280: 'The type is peculiarly rich and bold, and is hardly equalled by any Dutch edition of a classic') (Details: Back with 5 raised bands, title in red & black; engraved frontispiece (dated 1601!) by J. Goeree and P. Boutats, depicting an allegorical scene: a host of philosophers, authors, generals are admiring the statue of a woman on a pedestal (Hestia?); in her left hand she holds an oil lamp, with her right hand she point at an animal painting; surrounded by putti in the sky floats a portrait of the prince of Orange, Johannes Willem Friso. Engraving on the title of the battle at the Milvian bridge, with the motto 'in hoc signo'; folding plate with the portrait of prince Johannes Willem Friso, after Vaillant. Numerous etched vignettes, engraved head- and tailpieces, initials; 18 plates, each with 6 scenes from the fables, designed and engraved by J. van Vianen) (Condition: Cover shabby; head & tail of back chafed; half of the leather gone on 3 compartments; corners bumped; paper on both covers partly gone; endpapers worn; a few small tears in margins of the portrait; a few small ink spots) (Note: David van Hoogstraten (1658-1724) was conrector of the Schola Latina at Amsterdam from 1694 till 1722. He wrote Dutch and neolatin poetry, and is well known for his lexicon 'Nieuw woordenboek der Nederlantsche en Latynsche tale' (1704, 1719, 1736). He published editions and translations of Nepos, Terentius and Phaedrus (NNBW 831-833). Van Hoogstraten was influential in the field of Dutch language studies in the 18th century with his work: 'Aenmerkingen over de geslachten der zelfstandige naemwoorden'(1700). At the end of this edition we find an Appendix with 5 fables collated from an old manuscript by the German classical scholar Marquard Gudius, 1635-1689. This Phaedrus edition is published in the manner of French editions of classical works published for the use of the French Dauphin, and was specially made for Johan Willem Friso, 1687-1711, Sovereign of Nassau-Dietz (1696-1711), Prins van Oranje (1702-1711) and 'stadhouder' of Friesland (1707-1711) and Groningen (1708-1711). He was the only heir of his second cousin 'stadhouder' Willem III, (King William III of England, Scotland & Ireland) who died in 1702. From him he inherited the title of Prince of Orange) (Provenance: bookplate on front pastedown, a woman holding a shield with the coat of arms of John Blackburne Esq. Orford, (1754-1833), a celebrated botanist and researcher in natural history) (Collation: * - 4*-4, A - 2F-4, 2H-2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140093 Euro 350,00
PHAEDRUS. Phaedri, Aug. liberti, Fabularum Aesopiarum libri V. Cum integris commentariis Marq. Gudii, Conr. Rittershusii, Nic. Rigaltii, Is. Neveleti, Nic. Heinsii, Joan. Schefferi, Jo. Lud. Praschii, & excerptis aliorum curante Petro Burmanno. The Hague (Hagae-Comitum), Apud Henricum Scheurleer, 1718. 8vo. 2 parts in 1: (LXII),398;258,(70 index) p., including frontispiece. Vellum 19.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,735; Dibdin 2,280; Moss 2,394) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints; borders of both covers tooled in blind with double fillet, and with gilt floral ornaments at the corners of blind tooled rectangles; title in red & black; printer's device on title, depicting a flying Hermes, and with an appropriate motto: 'Voor konst en koopmanschap'; frontispiece designed by P. Tiedeman and executed by J. Mulder, depicting Phaedrus with pen on paper while listening to his Muse; in the background Aesopus surrounded by fable animals) (Condition: Vellum soiled; back spotted; all 4 ties gone; front hinge cracking, but still strong; a few gatherings are slightly loosening; the paper of the frontispiece is yellowing) (Note: The Roman poet Phaedrus, 15 B.C. - ca. 50 A.D., occupies in the history of the fable a very important role. He was a slave of Thracian descent, and became a freedman (libertus) of the first Roman emperor Augustus. He composed 5 books (probably incomplete) of verse fables. His beast-tales are adaptions of the fables of the Greek poet and archfabulist Aesopus, or Aisopos (6th century B.C), and inventions of his own. Phaedrus prides himself to have elevated the fable into an independent genre of literature. Sometimes he satirizes contemporary conditions, and he is always fond of emphasizing the moral of the story. 'The presentation is, in general, animated and marked by a brevity of which Phaedrus is rightly proud, but which sometimes leads to obscurity' (OCD 2nd ed. p. 809). Nevertheless, his style is clear, pure and simple, this in contrast to the swollen rhetoric of his time. He was widely read in the Middle Ages. During the 17th & 18th he was also very much en vogue. Schweiger lists hundreds of editions. Very popular among scholars and students were the Dutch Variorum editions of Phaedrus. This kind of editions offered a 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, and was accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. This 'Variorum edition' was produced by the leading scholar Petrus Burmannus, 1668-1741. He was professor of Latin at the University of Utrecht since 1696, and at Leiden since 1715. As an editor he was an industrious manufacturer of Variorum Editions, confining himself to the Latin classics. He edited besides Phaedrus, Horace, Claudian, Ovid, Lucan, and the Poetae Latini Minores, Petronius, Quintilian, Suetonius. (Sandys 2 p. 343/5). Moss declares that this edition of Phaedrus by Burmannus 'is held in considerable estimation'. Moss's high opinion may be correct, and the motto on the title, 'for art and trade' may also speak of great expectations, nevertheless it was not the success the publisher Scheurleer hoped for. We compared this 1718 edition with copies of the edition of 1728, brought on the market by the wellknown Leyden based firm of Samuel Luchtmans, and must conclude that Luchtmans must have bought the remainder of unsold copies of the edition of 1718 from Scheurleer, removed the original title, and added only a new title-page dated 1728. The books are identical, except for the title-page) (Collation: *-4*8 (minus leaf 4*8); A- 2B8 (leaf 2B8 blank); a-v8, x4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130381 Euro 280,00
PHAEDRUS. Phaedri, Aug. liberti, Fabularum Aesopiarum libri V. Cum integris commentariis Marq. Gudii, Conr. Rittershusii, Nic. Rigaltii, Is. Neveleti, Nic. Heinsii, Joan. Schefferi, Jo. Lud. Praschii, & excerptis aliorum curante Petro Burmanno. Leiden (Lugduni in Batavis), Apud Samuelem Luchtmans, 1728. 8vo. 2 parts in 1: (LXII),398;258,(70 index) p., including frontispiece. Calf 21 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,736; cf. Dibdin 2,280; cf. Moss 2,394) (Details: Back with 5 raised bands; morocco letterpiece, once red, in second compartment; floral gilt ornaments in the other compartments; marbled endpapers; title in red & black; woodcut ornament on title; frontispiece designed by P. Tiedeman and executed by J. Mulder, depicting Phaedrus with pen on paper while listening to his Muse; in the background Aesopus surrounded by fable animals) (Condition: Back scuffed; corners bumped) (Note: The Roman poet Phaedrus, 15 B.C. - ca. 50 A.D., occupies in the history of the fable a very important role. He was a slave of Thracian descent, and became a freedman (libertus) of the first Roman emperor Augustus. He composed 5 books (probably incomplete) of verse fables. His beast-tales are adaptions of the fables of the Greek poet and archfabulist Aesopus, or Aisopos (6th century B.C), and inventions of his own. Phaedrus prides himself to have elevated the fable into an independent genre of literature. Sometimes he satirizes contemporary conditions, and he is always fond of emphasizing the moral of the story. 'The presentation is, in general, animated and marked by a brevity of which Phaedrus is rightly proud, but which sometimes leads to obscurity' (OCD 2nd ed. p. 809). Nevertheless, his style is clear, pure and simple, this in contrast to the swollen rhetoric of his time. He was widely read in the Middle Ages. During the 17th & 18th he was also very much en vogue. Schweiger lists hundreds of editions. Very popular among scholars and students were the Dutch Variorum editions of Phaedrus. This kind of editions offered a 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, and was accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. This 'Variorum edition' was produced by the leading scholar Petrus Burmannus, 1668-1741. He was professor of Latin at the University of Utrecht since 1696, and at Leiden since 1715. As an editor he was an industrious manufacturer of Variorum Editions, confining himself to the Latin classics. He edited besides Phaedrus, Horace, Claudian, Ovid, Lucan, and the Poetae Latini Minores, Petronius, Quintilian, Suetonius. (Sandys 2 p. 343/5). Didbin and Moss do not mention this 'Variorum edition' of 1728. They mention only the Burmannus editions of 1698 and 1718. Schweiger had a sharper eye, for he observes about this edition of 1728: 'Bloss neuer Titel zur Ausgabe von 1718'. This 1728 edition is indeed exactly the same as the edition of 1718. We compared both editions, and must conclude that Luchtmans must have bought the unsold copies of the edition of 1718 from the publisher Scheurleer in The Hague, removed the original title, added only a new title-page dated 1728, and brought them to the market for the second time) (Collation: *-4*8 (minus leaf 4*8); A-2B8 (minus leaf 2B8); a-v8, x4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130435 Euro 220,00
PHAEDRUS. Ezopische Fabelen van Fedrus, gevryden slaef des Keizers Augustus. In Nederduitsch dicht vertaelt en met Aanmerkingen verrykt door D. van Hoogstraten. The Hague ('s Gravenhage), By Gerard Block, 1739. 8vo (XLVIII),259,(1 blank),37,(1 blank) p. Vellum 15.5 cm (Ref: Geerebaert 125,2,a) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Title in red & black. Woodcut floral ornament on the title. Woodcut initials) (Condition: Binding age-tanned and slightly spotted; small bookplate on the front pastedown. 2 ownership entries on the front flyleaf) (Note: David van Hoogstraten (1658-1724) was conrector of the Schola Latina at Amsterdam from 1694 till 1722. He wrote Dutch and neolatin poetry, and is well known for his lexicon 'Nieuw woordenboek der Nederlantsche en Latynsche tale' (1704, 1719, 1736). He published editions and translations of Nepos, Terentius and Phaedrus (NNBW 831-833). This is the second edition of Van Hoogstraten's translation of the fables of Phaedrus. The first edition, which was published in 1702/03 in Amsterdam by François Halma, was a more ambitious project than this modest and cheaper version. It was in quarto and had engraved plates. One year earlier, in 1701, Halma had already produced Van Hoogstraten's scholarly Latin edition of Phaedrus, with ample commentary, which was specially made for prince Johan Willem Friso, 1687-1711, Prince of Orange (1702-1711) and 'stadhouder' of Friesland and Groningen. In the preface to the second edition of this translation the publisher Block tells the reader that this cheaper edition is primarily intended for young readers. He advises all family men to have their children read and reread this book. Van Hoogstraten dedicates his translation to the younger sister of Johan Willem Friso, princess Maria Amalia, 1689-1771, who was only 13 years old when it was first published. Van Hoogstraten was influential in the field of Dutch language studies in the 18th century with his work: 'Aenmerkingen over de geslachten der zelfstandige naemwoorden' (1700). It was his opinion that the Dutch language equalled the Greek, and that it surpassed the Latin (having no articles)) (Provenance: The bookplate is of one 'Herman Spaan'. On the flyleaf a small stamp: 'Ex libris A. Kerckhoffs'. This might be the Dutch linguist and cryptographer Auguste Kerckhoffs, 1835-1903, who was professor of languages at the École des Hautes Études Commerciales in Paris in the late 19th century. (See for this interesting man Wikpedia 'Auguste Kerckhoffs' and also 'Kerckhoffs's principle'. On the flyleaf also the name of 'H.J.' or 'H.I. van Reenen')(Collation: *-3*8, A-S8 (leaf R2 verso and S8 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 152273 Euro 180,00
PHALARIS. PHALARIDOS EPISTOLAI. Phalaridis Epistolae. Quas latinas fecit et interpositis Caroli Boyle notis, commentario illustravit Ioannes Daniel a Lennep. Mortuo Lennepio finem operi imposuit, praefationem et adnotationes quasdam praefixit L.C. Valckenaer. (And:) Richardi Bentleii Dissertatio de Phalaridis, Themistoclis, Socratis, Euripidis, aliorumque epistolis, et de fabulis Aesopi. Nec non eiusdem responsio qua dissertationem de epistolis Phalaridis vindicat a censura Caroli Boyle. Omnia ex anglico in latinum sermonem convertit Ioannes Daniel a Lennep. Groningen (Groningae), Apud Iacobum Bolt, 1777. 4to. 2 volumes: (II),108;LXVI,303,(VII);XXIV,381;(XLI) p. Contemporary vellum 25 cm (Ref: STCN p.p. 152267603; STCN p.p. 152268073; Hoffmann 3,54: 'vorzügliche Ausgabe'; Schweiger 1,226: 'die Erläuterungen werden sehr geschätzt'; Graesse 5,259; Ebert 16647; Brunet 4,592) (Details: Nice set. Short title in ink on the back. Blind stamped double fillet borders on the covers. 5 gilt ornaments in the corners and the center of the covers. The first volume still has its 4 ties) (Condition: The second volume lacks its ties. Stamp on both titles. Both volumes lack both flyleaves. Two small tears, one of 7 and one of 3 cm, emerging from the gutter, at the left upper corner of the title leaf of the 'Dissertatio' volume. Stamp on the lower edge of the bookblock) (Note: Phalaris was a tyrant of Acragas ca. 570-555, and became the archetype of the cruel tyrant. In late antiquity a collection of letters was forged which bore his name, and was believed to be genuine, and great literature. In 1697 Bentley proved in his 'Dissertation on the Epistles of Phalaris' that this letters, and the letters of several other ancient authors, were forgeries, because of historical inaccuracies and linguistic anomalies. In 1699 Bentley published an enlarged edition of this Dissertation. 'In the opinion of R.C. Jebb this is a work that marks an epoch in the History of Scholarship. It is not only a 'masterpiece of controversy' and a 'store-house of erudition', it is an example of critical method, heralding a new era. (Sandys 2,405). Johannes Daniel van Lennep, 1724-1771, was a pupil of Valckenaer. In 1752 he became professor of Greek and Latin in Groningen. He did much to spread the fame of Bentley. While prepairing an edition of the Letters of Phalaris he was helped by Ruhnken and Hemsterhuis. He produced a Latin translation and a rich commentary. After his premature death the edition was revised and completed by his teacher Valckenaer. The value of this book lies however not in the learned work of Van Lennep, but in the translation into Latin of the Dissertations of Bentley. 'Thus it happened that the most valuable of all critical essays remained long inaccessible except to natives of this country, and the few continental scholars who understood the English language. Nor was it till after nearly 80 years, when a Latin version of the Dissertation made by Van Lennep was published along with his edition of Phalaris, that foreigners became possessed of this literary treasure' (J.H. Monk, The life of Richard Bentley, London 1833, vol. 1, p. 126) (Provenance: An oval stamp on the title, 'Bibliotheca Xylini'. 'Xylinus means 'of wood', and the Dutch name 'Van den Hout' also means 'of wood'. The owner was 'Michael Petrus Josephus van den Hout', born January 13th 1918 in the city of Goirle. He published in 1954 a critical edition of the letters of Fronto, 'M. Cornelii Frontonis epistulae, adnotatione critica instructae', Leiden, Brill, 1954. He was a Fronto specialist. His work made all prior texts of Fronto obsolete. The standard edition is his Teubner text, Leipzig 1988. He published also a full scale, and the first ever, commentary, 'A commentary on the letters of M. Cornelius Fronto'. Leiden etc., Brill, 1999) (Collation: *-3*4; A-3G4 (minus blank leaf 3G4); pi1, A-3O4, 3P2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140087 Euro 350,00
PHILELEUTHERUS HELVETIUS. (Pseudonym of Johannes Jakob Zimmermann.) De miraculis quae Pythagorae, Apollonio Tyanensi, Francisco Assisio, Dominico, & Ignatio Lojolae tribuuntur, libellus, auctore Phileleuthero Helvetio. Douai (Duaci) (= Zürich), Typis Petri Columbii, 1734. 8vo. (XVI;XXXVI),404 p. Vellum 17 cm (Ref: Brunet 4,602; Graesse 5,263; E. Weller, 'Die falschen und fingirten Druckorte', Leipzig, 1858, p. 190) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Short title & year on the back. All 3 edges marbled. Good quality paper) (Condition: Vellum soiled. Old inscription on the front flyleaf: Bel exemplaire de ce livre curieux et recherché; old references written on the verso of this flyleaf) (Note: 'Johannes Jakob Zimmermann, Professor der Theologie an der Karlsschule in Zürich war der erste namhafte Vertreter der religiösen Aufklärung dieser Stadt'. Zimmermann was born in 1695 in Zürich, and died there in 1756. During his studies he came under the influence of freethinkers like Clericus and Grotius, and began to dislike orthodoxy, and grew interested in heretics. In 1737 he was appointed professor of natural law and of church history in his hometown, and later succeeded, against all expectations, in gaining a professorship of theology. (Hauptprofessur) 'In dieser Stellung entfaltete er eine bedeutende Thätigkeit als Lehrer und Freund der studirenden Jugend und veröffentlichte daneben eine Reihe von theils gelehrten, theils mehr populären Abhandlungen philosophischen und theologischen Inhaltes'. Zimmermann wanted to discuss fruchtbringende Fragen instead of the traditionellen Subtilitäten, and made a stand against Verketzerungssucht. He warned against too exaggerated views on the holiness of the first christians, and the visions and wonders that occurred in the first centuries of christianity. To proof his point he wrote this De miraculis quae Pythagorae, Apollonio Tyanensi, Francisco Assisio, Dominico, & Ignatio Lojolae tribuuntur, libellus. Their stories were merely inventions of naive followers, he argues. His scepticism brought him ennemies among the clergy, who opposed his arminian heresy. 'Zimmermann's Bekämpfung der Orthodoxie stützt sich auf die Überzeugung, das die Religion eine praktische Angelegenheit des Menschen sei. Das oberste Ziel der Religion ist die Besserung des Menschen. (...) Die zürcherischen Theologen der zweiten Hälfte des Jahrhunderts kamen aus seine Schule'. (ADB 45,271-273) Zimmermann's book against wonderworking and supernatural tales remained on the Index of forbidden books of the Catholic Church till 1948. It was published pseudonymously in Zürich. The name of the Swiss author was already revealed to the public in a review of the book in the Bibliothèque germanique, ou Histoire littéraire de l'Allemagne, de la Suisse et des Pays du Nord, Année 1735, Tome 31, p. 148/152. We quote part of the review: 'Après quelques Reflexions générales sur les Miracles, il parle d'abord de ceux de Pythagore & d'Apollonius, & puis de ceux de St. François, de St. Dominique, & de St. Ignace de Loyola. Ensuite il entre dans l'Examen de la doctrine, des moers; & du but de chacun des ces faiseurs de Miracles en particulier. Il prétend que les Miracles des uns & des autres ne sauroient venir de Dieu; mais il ne veut pas non plus qu'ils ayent été l'Ouvrage de Demon, desorte qu'il ne lui reste d'autre partie à prendre que de les taxer comme il fait de Chimeres & d'impostures, de faux Miracles ménagés par l'adresse des Charlatans Thaumaturges. On se sera pas faché de lire ce que Notre Auteur dit pour appuyer son sentiment, surtout par rapport aux prétendus Miracles d'Apollonius de Tyane. Monsieur Zimmermann ameroit mieux qu'on canonisât Socrate, que les trois Saints qu'il met en parallele avec Pythagore & avec Apollonius'. Zimmermann's pseudonym Phileleutherus Helvetius, means a Swiss loving freedom, or a Swiss liberal. This pen name echoes the pseudonym used by the famous English philologist and theologian Richard Bentley, 1662-1742, the greatest name among classical scholars of the first half of the 18th century. In 1710 he published a book with his emendations of the fragments of Menander and Philemon under this assumed name. Zimmermann, by chosing this name, seems to connect his endeavour to wipe out idolatry, superstition and the belief in wonders in pre-elightenment faith with the battle fought by Bentley against orthodox classical philologists who thought that old was best. He proved in his Dissertation upon th Epistles of Phalaris (1697), that some ancient text, which were believed to be old, authorative, and great literature, were in fact late antique forgeries without any literary or historical merit. Zimmermann tries to do the same. He argues that wondrous tales concerning Franciscus of Assisi, the founder of the Franciscan order, and Dominicus Guzman, the founder of the Dominican order, and Ignatius de Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order, which were considered to be true, and which were promoted by the Catholic Church, were in fact mendacious fabrications. (mendacia & figmenta Monachorum, p. a2 recto) He also battles against the veneration of saints and the canonization of numerous saints by the Catholic Church. The transsubstantion of the body of Christ is in his eyes ridiculous. As a consequence the Vatican placed this book on the Index of forbidden books. And allthough Zimmermann admits in his preface, in caeteris satis ostendi, me natura ad jocos risusque proclivem non esse (p. b4 verso), one reads on the title that this book was published in 'Duaci', i.e. in Duacum, the Latin form of the name of the city of Douai in North of France, near Arras. It was in this city in the Spanish Netherlands, now French Flanders, that the Spanish king Philip II founded in 1559 with the support of pope Paulus IV a university which was to be a catholic bulwark of the Contrareformation against the spreading of the protestantism in the Low Countries. The contemporary reader would immediately have realized that this was an impossible and funny combination, an antipapist book, on the title of which pagan charlatans were on equal level with great saints, being published in the lion's den of Douai. The book was however published in Zürich. The name of the printer/publisher deserves some attention too. The non existing name 'Petrus Columbius' (Peter Dove) in the imprint seems to be programmatic. Contemporary readers might recognize Acts 4:8-11, where the apostle Petrus speaks up filled with the Holy Spirit (repletus Spiritu Sancto), and explains that Christ is the only one a christian should worship. (Et non est in alio aliquo salus. Nec enim aliud nomen est sub caelo datum hominibus, in quo oporteat nos salvos fieri) This passage forbids to believe in wonders, other than those of Christ, and forbids to worship other deities/saints. The dove symbolises the Holy Spirit since early christianity. It is told (John, 1:32) that the Holy Spirit descended on Jesus's head like a dove (quasi columbam), when he was baptized by John the Baptist in the Jordan. By way of conclusion we cite the titles of some chapters. Chapter 10: Miracula Pythagorae, Apollonii, Francisci, Dominici, Lojolae non sunt a Deo, quia doctrina eorum omnibus Dei virtutibus contraria, 11: '(...) quia Relig. Christianae veritatem & divinitatem subvertunt; 13: Disquiritur, utrum Miracula illa Diabolo sint tribuenda'. There is also a chapter (15) in which Zimmermann proves that Pontifices illos homines fuisse, cum rerum divinarum ignarissimos, tum impudentissimos, nequissimosque) (Collation: *8, a-b8, A-2B8 2C2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120531 Euro 450,00
PHILOSTRATUS. Philostrati Lemnii Senioris Historiae de vita Apollonii Tyanei libri octo. Alemano Rhinuccino Florentino interprete. Eusebius contra Hieroclem, qui Tyaneum Christo conferre conatus est. Zenobio Acciolo Florentino interprete. Omnia haec ad Graecam veritatem diligenter castigata, & restituta, adiectis ubi opus esse videbatur, annotatiunculis. Paris (Parisiis), Apud Petrum Beguin, 1555. 12mo in 8. (XXXII),634 (recte 638 p.) 18th century vellum 12.5 cm (Ref: Hoffman 3,81; Ebert cf. 16748a) (Details: Latin translation only. Printed entirely in italics. Two thongs laced through the joints; short title on the back) (Condition: Vellum age-toned. all 4 ties gone. Front flyleaf pasted on the front pastedown; red round stamp on the title and last page; the paper of 3 gatherings is yellowing) (Note: The Suda, a 10th century Byzantine encyclopedia, knows three Greek sophists called Philostratus, three generations living between 160 and 250 A.D. The first one is thought to have written most works, the Vita Apollonii (Life of Apollonius), the Vitae Sophistarum (Biographies of Sophists), the Gymnastikos, the Heroikos, the Eikones, and Dialexeis, and a collection of 73 letters, mostly love letters. (Neue Pauly 9, s.v. Philostratos 5-8) In the first years of the third century Philostratus moved to Rome, where he entered the court of the emperor Septimius Severius. There he wrote ca. 307 A.D. at the behest of the empress Julia Domna Augusta, whose favour he enjoyed, a biography of the neopythagorean ascetic and wandering philosopher, and also miracle-monger, Apollonius of Tyana. Few books have over a long period of time aroused so much upheaval among Christians as this biography. Apollonius was born in the same year when Jesus Christ is supposed to be born. It is almost impossible to reveal Apollonius' true identity, or to decide wether this is a biography of a real or fictionalized hero, or just an Heliodoran romance or a romantic hagiography, or even a documentary romance. The question can be dealt from so many angles, that the Philostratean studies constitute a separate branch in the research of the culture of the Early Roman Empire. The problem is 'that Philostratus, as a man of letters and sophist full of passion for Greek romance and for the studies in rhetoric, was hardly interested in the historical Apollonius'. (Dzielska,M., 'Apollonius of Tyana in legend and history', Rome 1986, p. 14) A fact is that contemporary sources reveal next to nothing about Apollonius. 'To satisfy the empress's demand, who asked him (Philostratus) to narrate the life and achievements of Apollonius, he had to invent this figure as it were anew. Thus using his literary imagination, this moderately gifted writer turned a modest Cappadocian mystic into an impressive figure, full of life, politically outstanding, and yet also preposterous'. (Dzielska p. 14) Nothing proves that the 'Vita Apollonii Tyanensis' was widely read in the 3rd century. It would probably not have survived, were it not for the gouvernor of Bithynia, Sossianus Hierocles, one of the inspirators of the persecution of the Christians at the beginning of the third century in his province under the emperor Diocletian. At the beginning of the 4th century he published his 'Philaletes', a treatise against Christianity, in which he ridiculed the divine attributes of Christ, and praised Apollonius' virtues and thaumaturgic abilities. In the 'Philaletes' Hierocles propagated his pagan Christ Apollonius. The Christians were furiously enraged, because Hierocles dared to contrast Apollonius with their Saviour. The Christians won under Constantine, and the 'Philaletes' vanished soon from the face of earth. It is only known through the 'Against Hierocles' a treatise of the Churchfather Eusebius. The 'Vita Apollonii Tyanensis', in which it was believed that Apollonius was presented as the equal, if not the superior of Christ, survived however the burning of pagan literature by Christian mobs in early christianity. The 'editio princeps' of the Vita Apollonii', accompanied by a Latin translation was published by Aldus in 1501-1502. This Latin translation of the Vita was produced by the Florentine Alemanus Rinuccinus, and by Zenobius Acciola, who translated the Eusebius part. In a short preface Desiderius Iacotius Vandoperanus tells the reader that this edition of 1555 is a reissue of that first Latin translation, maintaining Aldus's arrangement of chapters and the notes. (Preface p. *3 verso) The translator of the 'Vita Apollonii' , the Florentine Alemanno Rinuccini, 1426-1504, held a number of honorable offices in the government of his city. He translated into Latin several of the Lives of Plutarch and this Vita. It was completed in 1473, but was not printed until 1501. (On Rinuccini, J. Hutton, 'The Greek Anthology in Italy to the year 1800', Ithaca/N.Y., 1935, p. 105/06) Zenobio Acciaiuoli, 1461-1519, 'was a Florentine, and in his youth a close friend of Politian and Ficino. (...) He joined the Dominican Order, weathered the stormy years that followed the expulsion of Piero de' Medici, and at last found a haven with Leo X, who made him prefect of the Vatican Library. To him are due a number of translations from the Greek, parts of Eusebius, Olympiodorus, Theodoretus and the like'. (Hutton, p. 164) (Provenance: On the title the red round stamp of the 'Libraria Colonna', with a column in its center. For this library, which must have been one of the richest in his time, we quote the 'Deutsche National Bibliothek': 'Der Teilung des Hauses Colonna in die Sciarra und die Barberini folgte die Zerstreuung der berühmten Galerie, und der Verkauf der Bibliothek deren Handschriften sich jetzt größtenteils im Vatikan befinden. Quelle: Pertz, Georg Heinrich. Italiänische Reise vom November 1821 bis August 1823'. (http://d-nb.info/gnd/1035402718/about/html) (Collation: *8, *8, a-z8, §8, A-Q8. errors in the pagination in the gatherings r and G) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 151935 Euro 500,00
PHILOSTRATUS. TA TÔN PHILOSTRATÔN LEIPOMENA HAPANTA. Philostratorum quae supersunt omnia. Vita Apollonii libris VIII; Vitae Sophistarum libris II, Heroica, Imagines priores atque posteriores et epistolae. Accesere Apollonii Tyanensis epistolae, Eusebii liber adversus Hieroclem, Callistrati descript. statuarum, omnia ex MSS Codd. recensuit, notis perpetuis illustravit, versionem totam fere novam fecit Gottfridus Olearius. Leipzig (Lipsiae), Apud Thomam Fritsch (at the end: 'Typis Christophori Fleischeri, an. MDCCIX'), 1709. Folio. (VIII),XLIII, (I);987 p. Vellum 36 cm (Ref: Hoffman 3,77/78; Ebert 16744a; Brunet 4,619; Spoelder 493, Amsterdam 12; not yet in VD18) (Details: Prize copy, with the prize, dated 1815. Back with 6 raised bands; the arms of amsterdam in each compartment; the borders of both covers are gilt, and consist of a series of the arms of the city and floral ornaments; this rectangular border is repeated in smaller type round the gilt coat of arms of Amsterdam in the center of the covers; printed prize, with the engraved arms of Amsterdam, on thick paper; title in red and black; woodcut printer's mark on the title: a pegasus flying among the clouds; text in 2 columns, Greek with opposing Latin translation; on the lower part of the pages the commentary; occasional text engravings) (Condition: Vellum age-toned, and somewhat spotted; remains at the right edge of the frontcover of 2 green ties; the ties on the backcover are gone; paper yellowing; occasionally foxing) (Note: The Suda, a 10th century Byzantine encyclopedia, knows three Greek sophists called Philostratus, three generations living between 160 and 250 A.D. The first one is thought to have written most works, the Vita Apollonii (Life of Apollonius), the Vitae Sophistarum (Biographies of Sophists), the Gymnastikos, the Heroikos, the Eikones, and Dialexeis, and a collection of 73 letters, mostly love letters. (Neue Pauly 9, s.v. Philostratos 5-8) In the first years of the third century Philostratus moved to Rome, where he entered the court of the emperor Septimius Severius. There he wrote ca. 307 A.D. at the behest of the empress Julia Domna Augusta, whose favour he enjoyed, a biography of the neopythagorean ascetic and wandering philosopher, also miracle-monger, Apollonius of Tyana. Few books have over a long period of time aroused so much upheaval among -Christians as this biography. Apollonius was born in the same year when Jesus Christ is supposed to be born. It is almost impossible to reveal Apollonius' true identity, or to decide wether this is a biography of a real or fictionalized hero, or just an Heliodoran romance or a romantic hagiography, or even a documentary romance. The question can be dealt from so many angles, that the Philostratean studies constitute a separate branch in the research of the culture of the Early Roman Empire. The problem is 'that Philostratus, as a man of letters and sophist full of passion for Greek romance and for the studies in rhetoric, was hardly interested in the historical Apollonius'. (Dzielska,M., 'Apollonius of Tyana in legend and history', Rome 1986, p. 14) A fact is that contemporary sources reveal next to nothing about Apollonius. 'To satisfy the empress's demand, who asked him (Philostratus) to narrate the life and achievements of Apollonius, he had to invent this figure as it were anew. Thus using his literary imagination, this moderately gifted writer turned a modest Cappadocian mystic into an impressive figure, full of life, politically outstanding, and yet also preposterous'. (Dzielska p. 14) Nothing proves that The 'Vita Apollonii Tyanensis' was widely read in the 3rd century. It would probably not have survived, were it not for the gouvernor of Bithynia, Sossianus Hierocles, one of the inspirators of the persecution of the Christians at the beginning of the third century in his province under the emperor Diocletian. At the beginning of the 4th century he published his 'Philaletes', a treatise against Christianity, in which he ridiculed the divine attributes of Christ, and praised Apollonius' virtues and thaumaturgic abilities. In the 'Philaletes' Hierocles propagated his pagan Christ Apollonius. The Christians were furiously enraged, because Hierocles dared to contrast Apollonius with their Saviour. The Christians won under Constantine, and the 'Philaletes' vanished soon from the face of earth. It is only known through the 'Against Hierocles' a treatise of the Churchfather Eusebius. The 'Vita Apollonii Tyanensis', in which it was believed that Apollonius was presented as the equal, if not the superior of Christ, survived however the burning of pagan literature by Christian mobs in early christianity. The Vitae Sophistarum, is a collection of biographies of 59 Greek sophists of the socalled Second or New Sophistic. Philostratus consulted their works, but used also the oral tradition. This work is a valuable source for the history of philosophy from Nero to the beginning of the third century. The 'Gymnastikos' is a treatise on Greek athletics. In the 'Heroikos' the ghosts of Heroes, especially Protesilaos, tell remarkable particulars about themselves. The 'Imagines' , the description of paintings, of Philostratus and the 'Descriptio statuarum' , the description of statues, written by Callistratus belong to the rhetorical genre of 'ecphrasis', in which the relation of the verbal and visual was explored. Ancient Greek rhetoricians defined it as a 'speech that brings the thing shown vividly before the eyes', for instance the famous description of the Shield of Achilles by Homer in the 18th book of the Iliad, vs. 478/608. 'In modern criticism ecphrasis has come to be defined as the 'description of a work of art, a category that may be restricted to the visual arts (painting and sculpture) or expanded to include architecture and other arts'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 291, s.v. Ecphrasis) The German theologian and classical scholar Gottfried Olearius, 1672 - 1715, was appointed professor of Greek and Latin at the University of Leipzig in 1699. In 1693 he started a journey which brought him to Oxford and Cambridge, where he stayed for more than a year to study Greek manuscripts. (ADB 24, 277/78, he has also a lemma in Wikipedia ) (Provenance: The prize has been bound before the title. The text is: 'A. MDCCCXV, Ingenuo optimaeque spei Adolescenti, Henrico Woerman (Name in manuscript). Propter insignes in Graecis litereis progressus, in classe prima, Praemium hoc literarium lubentes dederunt ex decreto Amplissimi Scholarchae Amstelaedamenses. Quod testor Herm. Bosscha (name manuscript) Gymnasii publici Amstelaedamensis rector. Examine verno XXIV Mart.' At http://www.genealogieonline.nl we found a Hendrik Woerman, born in 1799, who died in 1877. Hendrikus (Hendrik, Hendricus) Woerman did not leave many traces after this promising beginning. In the 'Algemeene Konst en Letter-bode voor het jaar 1820', Haarlem, n.d., p. 163 we found a short article about the results of a competition organized by the University of Utrecht, for theology, law, literature, mathematics and physics. It is announced that 'Hendrik Woerman' has won the prize for theology. He is described as "Liter. Cand. et Theol. Stud.' In 1821 he produced a dissertation on the Old Testament. We find him back in the city of Delft as minister. He preached there for 40 years. He is described as follows on the 'Naamlijst van Predikanten die sedert 1572 de Ned. Herv. Gemeente te Delft gediend hebben': number 87, 1827, Henricus Woerman, van Harlingen, emeritaat 1866. Hendricus Woerman, Amsterdam, zn. van Hendrik Woerman en Diena van Enter'. Woerman married 07-06-1839 in Delft with Sara Cornelia Kleijn van Willigen. (http://www.wikidelft.nl/index.php?title=Lijst_van_Predikanten_1) (Collation: pi4, a - e4, f2 (leaf f2 verso blank) ; A - 6H4, 6I2 (leaf 6I2 verso blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 150630 Euro 750,00
PHILOSTRATUS. The two first books of Philostratus, concerning the life of Apollonius Tyaneus: written originally in Greek, and now published in English: together with philological notes upon each chapter. By Charles Blount, Gent. London, Printed for Nathaniel Thompson, next dore to the Sign of the Cross-Keys in Fetter-Lane, 1680. Folio. (VIII),243,(1) p. Calf 32 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 3,82; Ebert 16760 'Wurde verboten, weil man die Noten antichristlich fand') (Details: Back with 5 raised band; blind stamped double fillet border on both covers; title in red and black; woodcut text illustration, which represents a diagram of the philosophic schools in antiquity) (Condition: Cover scuffed; back rubbed; joints weak, joint of the frontcover starting to split; covers spotted; paper yellowing, partly browned; some pencil) (Note: Few books have over a long period of time aroused so much upheaval among Christians as this biography of the neopythagorean ascetic and wandering philosopher Apollonius of Tyana, produced by the Greek sophist and rhetor Philostratus at the beginning of the 3rd century A.D. This is the first English translation of the first 2 books (of 8) of this Life of Apollinius of Tyana. The translation was speedily condemned and suppressed by the Church of England, because it was held to be a most dangerous attempt against the church. Only a few copies were sent abroad. Apollonius was born in the same year when Jesus Christ is supposed to be born. It is almost impossible to reveal Apollonius' true identity, or to decide wether this is a biography of a real or fictionalized hero, or just an Heliodoran romance or a romantic hagiography, or even a documentary romance. The question can be dealt from so many angles, that the Philostratean studies constitute a separate branch in the research of the culture of the Early Roman Empire. The problem is 'that Philostratus, as a man of letters and sophist full of passion for Greek romance and for the studies in rhetoric, was hardly interested in the historical Apollonius'. (Dzielska,M., 'Apollonius of Tyana in legend and history', Rome 1986, p. 14) A fact is that contemporary sources reveal next to nothing about Apollonius. Philostratus wrote the biography at the behest of the empress Julia Domna Augusta. 'To satisfy the empress's demand, who asked him (Philostratus) to narrate the life and achievements of Apollonius, he had to invent this figure as it were anew. Thus using his literaty imagination, this moderately gifted writer turned a modest Cappadocian mystic into an impressive figure, full of life, politically outstanding, and yet also preposterous'. (Dzielska p. 14) Nothing proves that the 'Vita Apollonii Tyanensis' was widely read in the 3rd century. It would probably not have survived, were it not for the gouvernor of Bithynia, Sossianus Hierocles, one of the inspirators of the persecution of the Christians in 301 A.D. in his province under the emperor Diocletian. At the beginning of the 4th century he published his 'Philaletes', a treatise against Christianity, in which he ridiculed the divine attributes of Christ, and praised Apollonius' virtues and thaumaturgic abilities. In the 'Philaletes' Hierocles propagated his pagan Christ Apollonius. The Christians were furiously enraged, because Hierocles dared to contrast Apollonius with their Saviour. The Christians won under Constantine, and the 'Philaletes' vanished soon from the face of earth. It is only known through the 'Against Hierocles' a treatise of the Churchfather Eusebius. The 'Vita Apollonii Tyanensis', in which it was believed that Apollonius was presented as the equal, if not the superior of Christ, survived however the burning of pagan literature by Christian mobs in early christianity. Translations of the 'Vita' which began to appear in the 16th century were immediately put under ecclesiastical ban. The English translation of 1680, by the leisured gentleman Charles Blount, 1654-1694, a deist and freethinking philosopher, and especially his notes, raised such an outcry among christian believers in England that the book was condemned by the Church of England in 1693, banned and its further publication forbidden. Hoffmann observes that the stock might have been burned (vielleicht verbrant). On what ground he thinks so, is not clear. Still, 'fierce passions were let loose. Sermons, pamphlets and volumes descended upon the presumptuous Blount like fireballs and hailstones and his adversaries did not rest until the authorities had forbidden him to print the remaining six book of his translation'. (R.W. Bernard, 'Apollonius, the Nazarene', 1956, p. 10) Blount persisted that if the miracles of Apollonius were untrue, so were those of Jesus. In his preface Blount is very cautious. He presents the 'Life' as being 'no more than a bare narrative of the Life of a Philosopher, not of a new Messiah'. Philostratus never even mentions Christ, he says. 'And if one Heathen Writer (Hierocles) did make an ill use of this History, by comparing Apollonius with Christ, what is that to Philostratus, who never meant nor design'd it so' (Preface p. A2 verso). Blount had already finished the translation of all 8 books, he tells the reader, 'when I found the Alarm was given in all parts what a Dangerous Book was coming out; (...) which might therefore prove of pernicious consequence of the Publick'. He fears for his life he says, and therefore publishes only the first 2 books. 'I have thought fit to proroque the remaining part of this history'. (p. A3 verso) Especially Blount's very elaborate illustrations and annotations to the text were considered to be dangerous atheist freethinking. A century later Blount's notes were translated into French and published in Amsterdam in 1779. It was ironically dedicated to Pope Clement XIV by one 'Philaletes' ) (Collation: A-Z4, Aa-Gg4, H6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 150254 Euro 950,00
PHOTIUS. Photii Sanctissimi Patriarchae Constantinopolitani Epistolae. Per Reverendum Virum Richardum Montacutium, Norvicensem nuper Episcopum, latine redditae, & notis subinde illustratae. London, Ex officina Rogeri Danielis, 1651. Folio. (8), 393,(11) p. Contemporary calf. 35 cm (Ref: ESTC R12714; Hoffmann 3,89; Brunet 4,624; Ebert 16779) (Details: Gilt back with 6 raised bands; gilt coat of arms on both covers; printer's device on title; Greek text with facing Latin translation.) (Condition: Binding somewhat rubbed; upper & lower part of front joint split over 4 and 6 cm; tiny bump in front board; small stamp on title; small hole in text of leaf 2A2) (Note: Editio princeps of the letters of Photius, (248). Text and translation by Richard Montague, 1577-1641, a well known Greek scholar, who later became bishop of Norwich. He used a manuscript of the Bodleian, and a manuscript brought to England by Chr. Ravius for 5 other letters. He previously edited Johannes Chrysostomus) (Provenance: coat of arms on covers: a shield with 2 eagles and 2 griffins in the quarters, flanked by 2 greyhounds standing on the hindlegs. Above the shield a ducal crown, left of the crown a bishop's mither, on the right a crosier. Stamp on title: Minderbroeders, Heerlen) (Collation: Folio in 4 leaves: A - 3D4, 3E6) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 022020 Euro 1000,00
PLATO.- HEUSDE,Ph.G. VAN. Specimen criticum in Platonem. Accedit D. Wyttenbachii epistola ad auctorem, item collationes codicum MSS. Platonis cum a D. Ruhnkenio confectae, tum aliae. Ed. 2a. Leiden, Luchtmans, 1818. 60,8,174 p. H.calf 22 cm (Back gilt, red morocco shield on the back; nice copy) (Photographs on request) Leiden, Luchtmans, 1818.
Book number: 101361 Euro 105,00
PLAUTUS. M. Acci Plauti Comoediae XX. superstites, nunc denuo post omnium editiones, ad fidem meliorem codd. & inprimis vetustissimis MSS. Camerarii, seu Camerario-Palatinorum, ut & doctissimis virorum curas accuratius exactae, & novis commentariis illustratae. (...) Plautina item fragmenta ad similem faciem concinnata, & Plauto denique supposita omnia studio & industria Frid. TAUBMANNI. (Wittenberg), Apud Zachariam Schurerum (typis Johannis Gormanni), 1612. 4to. 2 volumes: (XVI,XXIV),1320,(122 index),(1 printer's mark)(1 blank) p. 19th cent. boards. 24 cm (Ref: VD17 1:043513Q. Schweiger p. 764/5: 'Gänzliche Umarbeitung seiner Ausg. (...) T.'s Commentar ist höchst schätzbar'. Dibdin 2,311: Taubmann 'has greatly contributed towards the restoration of the true text of Plautus'. Fabricius/Ernesti, Bibl. Lat. 1773, I,19/20: 'Praestantissimae ad intelligendum hunc Comicum sunt editiones Taubmannianae, (...) contextum pluribus locis exhibent meliorem, ac praeter luculentos commentarios, omnium, quique ante Plauto manus admoverant, industriam delibantes ac vincentes') (Details: 19th cent. uniform black boards with red morocco letterpiece; printer's mark on the title; this mark (an intertwined snake, feather & laurel, and a soaring bird, a pigeon?), is repeated at the end, with the addition 'Wittenbergae, typis Johannis Gormanni'. The motto reads 'Simplicitas astu bene fermentata triumphat'.) (Condition: Covers very scuffed, worn at extremities; paper on the covers & the backs partly worn away; joints of the second volume cracking; small inkstain on upper edge of first 100 pages; title browned; regularly old ink underlinings, occasional ink annotations by a German hand; ownership entries on front endpapers) (Note: The German humanist Friedrich Taubmann, 1565-1613, a man of humble origin, was Professor Poeseos at the University of Wittenberg since 1595. He was also an accomplished Neolatin poet. His favorite author (meum poeticum cor) was the Roman playwright Plautus, ca. 250-184 B.C. He considered his much critized first edition of Plautus of 1605 a disaster, and asked the publisher to destroy the remainder (2/3) of the copies printed, and to replace it by a revised second edition, which was indeed published in 1612. Taubmann was a above all a compiler of the commentaries of others. He employed the Plautus text of Camerarius for his edition, and new material provided by the Dutch classical scholar Janus Gruterus, or in Dutch Jan Gruter, since 1602 Keeper of the Bibliotheca Palatina at Heidelberg. Gruter had bought from the sons of Joachim Camerarius (1500-1574) for his library 2 manuscripts, the 'codex vetus' and 'codex decurtatus', because he realized more than Camerarius himself the exceptional worth of both manuscripts. Taubmann received valuable help from the Keeper, who collated the Palatine manuscripts, and made good use them in his second edition. 'In der That beruht der Werth der Taubmann'schen Edition in dem ausserordentlichen Reichthume der commentatorischen Parallelen; nach dieser Hinsicht mag sie heute noch mehr als geschichtliche Aufmerksamkeit beanspruchen. Die zweite Ausgabe war textlich viel sorgsamer und übertraf in Correctheit, Typenwahl und Ausstattung die über alle Maassen liederliche erste erklecklich' (ADB 37,433-440). This second edition of 1612 receives also much praise from Schweiger, Dibdin and Fabricius/Ernesti. At the end are added 2 treatises, the first by J. Camerarius 'De Fabulis Plautinis' and the second by J.C. Scaliger 'De carminibus Comicis'. Taubmann died the year after the appearance of this great edition, leaving a wife and 5 young children. His edition's fame survived him) (Provenance: 'Laurenz Lersch, 1835', and 'Paul Weiland stud. phil. 1883'; Johann Heinrich Laurenz Lersch, 1811-1849, was a German archaeologist and classical philologist. He has a lemma in Wikipedia) (Collation: a-b4, 2)(-4)(4; A-4Z4; a-4t4, 4u2) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140114 Euro 425,00
PLAUTUS. M. Accius Plautus ex fide, atque auctoritate complurium librorum manuscriptorum opera Dionys. Lambini Monstroliensis emendatus; ab eodemque commentariis explicatus. Nunc denuo plurimis, quae in praecedentibus editionibus irrepserant, mendis, repurgatus; multisque in locis in gratiam antiquariorum illustratus. Geneva (Coloniae Allobrogum), Apud Petrum & Iacobum Chouët, 1622. 4to. (VIII),920,(51 index),(1 blank) p. Overlapping vellum 24 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,765; Fabricius/Ernesti 1,18; Moss 2,461; Ebert 17188: 'Bloss Nachdruck der Lambinischen Ausgabe'; cf. GLN-3810) (Details: 6 thongs laced through both joints; title, with broad woodcut architectural borders; woodcut haedpieces; woodcut initials; at the end 2 indices, one 'verborum, locutionum & sententiarum', the other on the commentary of Lambinus) (Condition: Vellum age-toned & soiled; some slight foxing; right lower corner faintly waterstained; some old ink underlinings) (Note: The 21 surviving comedies of the Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus, ca. 254-184 B.C., have never been out of fashion since the publication of the 'editio princeps' in 1472. Plautus' influence on world literature is huge. The comedies feature stock situations and characters from everyday life. 'Plautine comedy is inventive, exuberant, varied, full of rollicking eavesdropping scenes, lyrical meters, slapstick, and verbal fireworks.' Early editors, commentators and translators ransacked the plays for rhetorical and moral examples. Ever since the first post-classical performances at the end of the 15th century Plautus never left the stage. The Italian 'commedia erudita' and the popular improvisatory 'commedia dell'arte' developed through imitations of the Roman New Comedy. Probably best known is Carlo Goldoni's adaptation of the Menaechmi (1748) 'I duo gemelli veneziani' (The Venetian Twins). Spain saw the development of 'comedias elegíacas', Latin verse that incorporated Plautine passages into dialogue. Authors like Calderón adopted many New Comedy stage conventions to Spanish taste. In Germany the great dramatist Andreas Gryphius adapted the Miles Gloriosus. And in France Molière, the greatest comic playwright of his age, imitated Plautus in his Amphitryon and in l'Avare. English playwrights like Ben Johnson and Shakespeare reworked plays of Plautus. 'Plautine comedy provided Shakespeare with character and action throughout his career, beginning with direct imitation of the Menaechmi with the Comedy of Errors'. A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Taming of the Shrew, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Tempest, they all adapt themes, situations and persons of Plautus. During the Golden Age of the Netherlands P.C. Hooft wrote Warenar (1617), an adaptation of Plautus' Aulularia. Plautus enjoyes also a new modern life on the screen. Rodgers and Hart created the music for the Boys from Syracuse (1938). Big Business (1988), inspired by the Menaechmi, tells the story of 2 sets of female twins (Bette Midler & Lily Tomlin) separated at birth. Pseudolus and Miles Gloriosus can be found in the hilarious musical and film A funny thing happened on the way to the Forum (1962) (Source of the quotations: The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, s.v. Plautus) The French scholar Dionysius Lambinus, 1520-1572, earned his fame in the field of Latin scholarship with his masterly editions of Horace (1561), Lucretius (1564) and Cicero (1566). He was Professor Regius of Greek at the Collège de France from 1561 till his death. The 19th century English editor and commentator of Lucretius H.A.J. Munro ranks him as one of the best scholars of his time. He says that 'The quickness of his intellect united with his exquisite knowledge of the language gave him great power in the field of conjecture, and for nearly 3 centuries his remained the standard text'. (Munro, DRN, 4th ed., vol. 1 p.14/15). Lambinus' 'reading was as vast as accurate, and its results are given in a style of unsurpassed clearness and beauty', Munro adds. In 1576/77, 4/5 years after his death appeared at last his edition of the comedies written by the Roman playwright Plautus, 250-184 B.C. It is his last great work, in which he showed great critical learning and ability to discover hidden meanings and innuendo. He fell ill, exhausted by the weight of his studies, and had only time to complete 13 of the 21 plays. This is told in an address to the reader by Iacobus Helias, or Jacques Hélias, or Jacques Hélie, who was the successor of Lambinus as Regius professor of Greek literature from 1572 till 1590, and who completed the work of his colleague. The difficulties, Helias says, in collating manuscripts, mending the text of Plautus, and writing a commentary are enormous. The text is corrupt, and deformed by mistakes and there is a host of different readings, caused by the ignorance and negligence of later generations. Helias lists the humanist scholars who shared with Lambinus their observations on difficult places, not forgetting himself. Lambinus had not left his work on Plautus ready to print. Helias completed the work partly by transcribing what remained of the observations of Lambinus on the subsequent comedies. He complemented what was left open, and supplied and corrected many quotations. Sometimes he had to work out what Lambinus had only sketched. Finally Helias added 2 indices, one for the text of Plautus, and the other for the commentary. Lambinus collated for his edition a number of manuscripts and collected many passages from the ancient grammarians. This is how Lambinus' Plautus is valued in modern scholarship: 'Many valuable emendations go back to Denis Lambin (...); his later comments reveal that he had lost energy and acumen due to his ailments'. (Plautus, Vol. 1, Loeb Classical Library no. 60, Cambr. Mass. 2011, p. CXIV) Lambinus' successor Helias left no trace in the history of scholarship, except for completing the work of his colleague. Our edition of 1622, produced by Chouët, is a reissue of the important edition of 1576/77) (Collation: ¶4, A-Z8; Aa-Zz8, AA-KK8, LL4, MM-PP8, QQ2 (leaf QQ2 verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 140137 Euro 420,00
PLAUTUS. M. Acci Plauti Comoediae Superstites XX. Accuratissime editae. Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Typis Ludovici Elzevirii, 1652. 24mo. 715,(5) p., engraved title. 19th century half calf. 13.5 cm (Ref: Willems 1152, note; Bergmann 2214; Rahir 3319; Schweiger 2,766; Ebert 17196; Brunet 4,709; Graesse 5,329) (Details: Back gilt, and divided in 7 compartments, in 4 of them gilt lozenges filled with tiny floral motives. Marbled endpapers. Uncut right and lower margin. Engraved title, depicting the playwright Plautus pointing with his left hand to a performance, in his right hand he holds a jester staff) (Condition: Binding slightly scuffed. Head of the spine very slightly damaged. Boards somewhat scratched and corners somewhat bumped) (Note: M. Accius Plautus, ca. 250-184 B.C., better known as Titus Maccius Plautus was a playwright of great talent, 'one of the highest type of dramatists, worthy to rank with Sophocles, for example, or Shakespeare'. (Rose,H.J. A handbook of Latin literature, London, 1967, p.40). 21 of his plays, the socalled 'fabulae Varronianae' survive more or less complete. His Vidularia survives only in mutilated fragments, and is not incorporated in this edition. This 1652 edition seems to be a reissue of the edition of 1630, which was produced by the Dutch scholar Johan Isaac Pontanus, 1561-1639. It was repeated in 1640 by the Blaeu Brothers, and in 1652 by Louis Elsevier, but only the text of the comedies, the short notes of Pontanus printed at the end were omitted. There exist however counterfeits of the Elsevier edition of 1652, and this book is one of them. This fake Elzevier edition was probably printed on a later date by Johan Blaeu. It has exactly the same original engraved (Elzevier) title, the same number of pages, and the same 5 pages at the end with a short biography of Plautus and testimonia. The only differences are the ornaments on the first and the last page, and the number of verses per page. Rahir supposes that Johan Blaeu or another printer, might have bought the copper plate of the engraved title of the 1652 edition, once used by the Amsterdam establishment of Lodewijk (Louis) Elzevier, at the sale of its material, after it had been closed down. If Rahir is right, Blaeu might have misused the good reputation of the Elzeviers, to sell his own product) (Provenance: A 19th century engraved armorial bookplate on the front pastedown: a seated fox, above his head a crown. The text reads 'Holland House'. Holland House was one of the first great houses built in Kensington in London. It was bought in 1768 by Henry Fox, First Baron Holland. This huge mansion was destroyed during the Blitz in 1940. On the verso of the front flyleaf in ballpoint the name 'Lennart Hakanson', 1939-1987, professor of Latin at the university of Uppsala) (Collation: A-2Y) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120295 Euro 170,00
PLAUTUS. M. Acci Plauti Comoediae. Accedit commentarius ex Variorum notis & observationibus. Quarum plurimae nunc primum eduntur. Ex recensione Ioh. Frederici Gronovii. Leiden (Lugd. Batavorum), Ex officina Hackiana, 1664. 8vo. (XVI),1154,(52 index) p. Calf 20.5 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,766; Dibdin 2,312: 'Gronovius by the assistance of 6 ancient MSS. and his own sagacious conjectures, has improved the text in many places, and given some ingenious and successful explanations of difficult passages'; Moss 2,461/2; Fabricius/Ernesti 1,21; Neue Pauly, Supplement Band 2, Geschichte der antiken Texte, Darmstadt 2007, p. 477) (Details: Gilt back with 5 raised bands; engraved title; commentary in 2 columns beneath the text) (Condition: Cover scuffed and scratched; shield on the back gone; front pastdown wrinkled; titlepage cut out, and mounted on blank flyleaf expertly, with removal of the blank margins; small hole in blank lower margin of the second leaf; lower margin of the second half partly and very faintly waterstained) (Note: The 21 surviving comedies of the Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus, ca. 254-184 B.C., have never been out of fashion since the publication of the 'editio princeps' in 1472. Plautus' influence on world literature is huge. The comedies feature stock situations and characters from everyday life. 'Plautine comedy is inventive, exuberant, varied, full of rollicking eavesdropping scenes, lyrical meters, slapstick, and verbal fireworks.' Early editors, commentators and translators ransacked the plays for rhetorical and moral examples. Ever since the first post-classical performances at the end of the 15th century Plautus never left the stage. The Italian 'commedia erudita' and the popular improvisatory 'commedia dell'arte' developed through imitations of the Roman New Comedy. Probably best known is Carlo Goldoni's adaptation of the Menaechmi (1748) 'I duo gemelli veneziani' (The Venetian Twins). Spain saw the development of 'comedias elegíacas', Latin verse that incorporated Plautine passages into dialogue. Authors like Calderón adopted many New Comedy stage conventions to Spanish taste. In Germany the great dramatist Andreas Gryphius adapted the Miles Gloriosus. And in France Molière, the greatest comic playwright of his age, imitated Plautus in his Amphitryon and in l'Avare. English playwrights like Ben Johnson and Shakespeare reworked plays of Plautus. 'Plautine comedy provided Shakespeare with character and action throughout his career, beginning with direct imitation of the Menaechmi with the Comedy of Errors'. A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Taming of the Shrew, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Tempest, they all adapt themes, situations and persons of Plautus. During the Golden Age of the Netherlands P.C. Hooft wrote Warenar (1617), an adaptation of Plautus' Aulularia. Plautus enjoyes also a new modern life on the screen. Rodgers and Hart created the music for the Boys from Syracuse (1938). Big Business (1988), inspired by the Menaechmi, tells the story of 2 sets of female twins (Bette Midler & Lily Tomlin) separated at birth. Pseudolus and Miles Gloriosus can be found in the hilarious musical and film A funny thing happened on the way to the Forum (1962) (Source of the quotations: The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, s.v. Plautus) At school Plautus was never in fashion. The plays were full of immorality, and Plautus' language was too indecent, and too difficult for young boys. Plautus was studied however widely in the 17th century at universities throughout Europe. Schweiger lists 37 editions of the Opera of Plautus for this century, 15 were published in Germany, 13 in the Netherlands, 5 in Geneva and 4 in France. Popular among scholars and students were the socalled Variorum editions. They offered the 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. This Plautus edition was produced by the Dutch classicist of German origin Johann Friedrich Gronov, or Gronovius, 1611-1671, He was the successor of Heinsius at the University of Leiden, and was influenced by Vossius, Grotius, Heinsius & Scriverius. 'His editions mark an epoch in the study of Livy, of Seneca, Tacitus & Gellius. (...) His interest to the textual criticism of Latin poetry was due to the discovery of the Florentine MS of the tragedies of Seneca. (...) In his riper years the acumen exhibited in his handling of prose is also exemplified in his treatment of the text of poets such as Phaedrus and Martial, Seneca and Statius'. (Sandys, History of Classical Scholarship, 2,321) With regard to his Plautus Sandys shows less enthousiasm. 'His edition of Plautus is marred by an imperfect knowledge of metre, which has been noticed by Bentley'. The work on Plautus by Gronovius is however highly valued by modern scholarship. Wolfgang de Melo, the editor of the new Loeb edition of 2011, places him among the great Plautus-scholars. He calls him 'an important editor of Plautus' (...) who particularly valued meter as the basis of emendations; his edition was published in 1664'. (Plautus, Vol. 1, Loeb Classical Library no. 60, Cambr. Mass. 2011, p. CXIV/CXV) Further proof of its importance for the history of Plautine scholarship is its listing in 'Supplement Band 2: Geschichte der antiken Texte' of the Neue Pauly. There seven important pre-1848 Plautus editions are mentioned, among which this edition of Gronovius) (Provenance: On the title the name of 'K.H.E. Schutter'. The owner once was Klaas Herman Eltjo Schutter, who wrote a dissertation 'Quibus annis comoediae Plautinae primum actae sint quaeritur'. Groningen, 1952) (Collation: *8, A-4F8, 4G4 (minus leaf 4G4) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130438 Euro 280,00
PLAUTUS.- PAREUS,J.Ph. Lexicon Plautinum, in quo elegantiae omnium simplicium vocabulorum antiquae linguae romanae, velut indice quodam absolutissimo, accurate eruuntur & explicantur. Passim quoque Variorum authorum Latinorum iuxta ac Graecorum loca enodantur & illustrantur, auctore J. Philippo Pareo. Frankfurt (Francofurti), Apud Nicolaum Hoffmannum, sumptibus Ionae Rosae, 1614. 8vo. (276 leaves = 14 and 538 unnumbered p.) Vellum. 20 cm (Ref: VD17 3:609063W; Schweiger 2,780; Ebert 17250; Graesse 5,133) (Details: 6 thonghs laced through the joints. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting a winged stag in flight, on its back a man brandishing with his left arm a coiling snake) (Condition: Vellum somewhat soiled. Bookplate on the front pastedown. Old ink inscription on the front flyleaf. Small wormholes in the upper margin, not affecting the text. A few small inkspots and ink annotations) (Note: The classicist Johann Philipp Pareus, 1576-1648, was one of the most laborious grammarians Germany ever produced. He did much for Plautine scholarship. He published in 1610 an edition of Plautus, and a revised edition in 1619, based on the first accurate collation of the Palatine MSS. A third edition appeared in 1641. In 1614 this 'Lexicon Plautinum' was published, in 1617 his 'Electa Plautina', in 1623 his 'Analecta Plautina', and in 1638 his 'De metris comicis ac praecipue Plautinis commentatio methodica'. 'Paraeus did permanent service to the study of Plautus by the publication of his Lexicon (1614, 2nd ed. 1634)', Sandys observes. The lexikon was praised by the German Plautus-specialist Ritschl. Pareus made also other useful contributions to Latin lexicography, e.g. in his edition of Terence. (ADB 12,169; Sandys 2,362) (Provenance: Bookplate of the Dutch hispanist 'Dr J.A. van Praag', 1895-1969, on the front pastedown. On the front flyleaf: in an old hand 'Constat 15 st.' (which means 15 stuivers, 1 stuiver being 1/20 of a Dutch guilder). § In a different hand: 'M. Tydeman 1816 Febr.' Mr. Meindert Tydeman, 1741-1825, was librarian since 1811 of the University Library of Leyden, and in 1814 he was appointed professor of philosophy). § In another recent hand: 'Santpoort, 3 Nov. 1947, J.A. van Praag'. § On the verso of this flyleaf a dedication: 'Egregio praestantissimoque juveni PETRO LIETAART discipulo & amico suo longe carissimo munusculum hoc offert Arn. Henr. Westerhovius. A.d. XVII Kal. Nov. 1721'. Arnoldus Henricus Westerhovius, (died 1737), of German origin, born in Hamm, Westfalen, was a Dutch critic and scholar. He was rector of the Schola Latina at Gouda till his death. His Terentius edition, first published in 1726, remained very popular throughout the 18th century. He also edited some orations of Cicero, Justinus & Nepos. The young man, Petrus Lietaart, was a member of a family of prominent citizens in the province of Holland, and must have been a pupil of Westerhovius at the Schola Latina of Gouda. We traced a notary named Pieter Lietaart ca. 1750 in the small town of Nieuwkoop, in the heart of Holland) (Collation: (?)8 (minus (?)8); A-2L8 (2L6,7 & 8 blank) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 130138 Euro 250,00
PLINIUS MAIOR. C. Plinii Secundi Historiae Mundi libri XXXVII. Cum castigationibus et adnotationibus doctiss. & variis praeterea lectionibus ex mss. compluribus ad oram paginarum accurate indicatis. Ex novissima & laboriosissima editione Iacobi Dalechampii, medici Cadomensis. Cum indice duplici, utroque locupletissimo. Acced