Loading...
Warning
  • JFolder::create: Could not create folder.Path: /domains
  • Key folder in safepath unaccessible
Print
EURIPIDES.
EURIPIDES.
EURIPIDES.
EURIPIDES.
EURIPIDES.
EURIPIDES.
EURIPIDES. EURIPIDOU TRAGÔDIAI ITH'. Euripidis Tragoediae XIX. In quibus praeter infinita menda sublata, carminum omnium ratio hactenus ignorata nunc primum proditur: opera Gulielmi Canteri Ultraiectini. Antwerpen (Antvverpiae), Ex officina Christophori Plantini, Regii prototypographi, 1571. 12mo in 8. (XXXII),809,(XXXIX) p. Contemporary blindstamped pigskin over wooden boards with brass clasps. 12.5 cm <The first modern Euripides edition> (Ref: Hoffmann 1,69; Dibdin 1,528/29; Moss 1,416; Neue Pauly, Suppl. 2, 'Geschichte der antiken Texte', p. 238; Voet 1144; Speeckaert 222; Netherlandish Books (NB) 11961; Ebert 7078; ; Graesse 2,519; Brunet 2,1096) (Details: Spine with 3 raised bands. Boards decorated with a row of blind-stamped rolls, comprising floral motives and portraits; the portraits are accompanied by enigmatic words which are reasonably legible, words like HEID, RUBE, LEXA, ALEX, ADOLF. The central panel adorned with palmets; edges dyed red. Plantin's woodcut printer's mark on the title. At the end has been printed a 'privilegium' for 6 years, dated 18 december 1569. Printed in a clear small type) (Condition: Cover rubbed and age toned; Both catches gone, and of the 4 clasps 3 are still intact; a few wormholes in the binding; wormhole in upper margin of gatherings a till o (first 240 p.) nibbling at a few letters; front flyleaf loosening; old ownership entries on front endpapers and title) (Note: This edition of 1571 of the tragedies of the Greek poet Euripides, ca. 480-406 B.C., may be called the first modern edition. In it 'the metrical responsions between strophe and antistrophe are clearly marked by means of Arabic numerals in the margin, and the text repeatedly corrected under the guidance of these responsions'. (J.E. Sandys, 'A History of Classical Scholarship', N.Y., 1964, vol. 2, 216/17) Sandys means, that this is the first edition of our tragedian that looks more or less like the editons as we know them today. Canter had made visible the outer structure of the lyrical parts. Earlier editors completely misunderstood the metrics of Greek poetry, and had the lyrical parts printed haphazardly. This work of fundamental importance was done by the Dutch classical scholar Willem Canter of Utrecht, 1542-1575, who spent the major part of his short life specializing in Greek tragedy. He succeeded in doing what he had accomplished for Euripides also in his posthumely published editions of Sophocles (1579) and Aeschylus (1580). Canter opens, Sandys declares, a new era of the tragic poets of Greece. In the preface (p. *3 verso - *6 verso) Canter proudly declares that there is no Greek author who's text was better restored in its original glory than the text of Euripides. He has done so by using his genius (ingeniolo) and by attentively reading the poet. He had some help from earlier work on Euripides done by the French scholars Henricus Stephanus and Johannes Brodaeus, but both often (non raro) corrupted the text which they wanted to correct, because they did not know anything of metrics (ratio carminum). And knowledge of the metrical structure of tragedies has helped him often, Canter continues, to emend quite a number of corrupt passages and fill in lacunae. He has, he boasts, for the first time brought to light the metrical structure in Euripides' lyrics, which had hitherto lain in darkness. This knowledge, he says, made it possible to understand the poet correctly (recte), and to correct mistakes. Greek grammatici who write about metrics often make an obscure text even more obscure (obscuriorem), he complains. Canter calls Sophocles also a victim of this wrong approach, and Aeschylus even more so (multo magis). That is why he promisses to do the same for them as he did for Euripides. The most important help (maximum adiumentum) he received from the Greek grammarian Hephaestion. Canter confesses that he simply applied the metrical observations of Hephaestion to Euripides. Canter's groundbreaking editions of Aeschylus and Sophocles were already completed in 1570, but only published after his death by Plantin. Nobody knows why it took Plantin 10 years to print both books. The study of metrics started already in the time of the Sophists. Herodotus knew iambic trimeters and hexameters. Later the Peripatetici and the Alexandrians developed the technical vocabulary and methods to analyse the metrical structure of lyric parts of tragedies and comedies. What we know of ancient metrics was handed down to us by late antique and byzantine grammarians and commentators, especially by the Alexandrian scholar Hephaestion (second century A.D.) whose 'Enchiridion' summarizes ancient knowledge, and offers examples from works now lost. With the help of Hephaestion's handbook Canter rediscovered the metrical responsion in the lyrical parts of the plays, and was able to correct the corrupted text using metrical responsion) (Provenance: 1: On the title in old ink, probably 18th century: 'Monii Nereshain', i.e.property of the 'Monasterii Nereshaim'. The monastry of Nereshaim is located in the city of Neresheim in Baden-Württemberg, in the South of Germany. During the Thirty Years War it was destroyed several times. The present abbey church, which was built around 1792, appeared on the reverse of the 50 Deutsche Mark banknote current up to 2002. We suppose that the book left the library after the secularisation of 1803. (Source Wikipedia, s.v. 'Abbey Neresheim') 2: On the title in old ink, probably 17th century: 'Joan. Beringen, '87'. 3: On the front pastedown in ink 'Baldi'. 4: on the recto of the front flyleaf 'Ex libris Jo. Bapts. Paris??i, J.U.D, Anno 1734 Roma'. We only know sofar that Giovanni Battista P. was a jurist, Iuris Utriusque Doctor.5: On the verso of this flyleaf 'William Beaumont Esquire, from W. Davies, Roma 1868'. 6: An oval stamp on the recto on the front flyleaf, 'Bibliotheca Xylini', and manuscript name on the verso of that leaf of 'Michiel van den Hout, Nijmegen 1-10-1940'. 'Xylinus means 'of wood', and 'Van den Hout' also means 'of wood'. Michael Petrus Josephus van den Hout, born January 13th 1918 in Goirle, published in 1954 a critical edition of the letters of Fronto, 'M. Cornelii Frontonis epistulae, adnotatione critica instructae', Leiden, Brill, 1954. His work made all prior texts of Fronto obsolete. The standard edition now is his Teubner text, Leipzig 1988. He published also a full scale, and the first ever, commentary, 'A commentary on the letters of M. Cornelius Fronto'. Leiden etc., Brill, 1999.)(Collation: pi1, *8 (the first gathering of 8 leaves is signed as: pi1, *1, *2, *4, *5, *6, *7 *8. The text is OK); A-Z8; a-z8 (leaf e7 & e8 blank, p. 445/48); Aa-Gg8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120070 Euro 1200,00

Keywords: (Oude Druk), (Rare Books), Altertumswissenschaft, Euripides, Greek literature, Griechische Literatur, Metrik, Textkritik, Tragödie, antike altertum antiquity, classical philology, metrics, textual criticism, tragedy
€ 1200,00

Reviews

There are yet no reviews for this product.