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BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS.
BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS.
BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS.
BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS.
BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS.
BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS.
BEAU,J.B. & P. CHACÓN & MARCUS VALERIUS PROBUS. Ioann. Bapt. Belli Cavaris Salyi e Societate Iesu Diatribae duae. Prima De partibus templi auguralis, altera De mense & die victoriae Pharsalicae. In utraque multa philologica, gramatica, geographica, cosmographica, historica, chronologica, sacra prophanaque hactenus obscura illustrantur. (Bound with:) Petri Ciacconii Toletani, In columnae rostratae C. Duilii inscriptionem, a se coniectura suppletam commentarius. (And:) Marci Valerii Probi Grammatici Vetustissimi, De notis Romanorum interpretandis libellus. Magnonis, Diaconi aliorumque notarum veterum explicationes. Ex veteribus libris partim emendantur, partim nunc primum eduntur. Toulouse (Tolosae), Apud Arnaldum Colomerium, 1637. Ad 2: Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Plantiniana, apud Franciscum Raphelengium, 1597. Ad 3: Leiden, (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Andream Clouquium, 1599. 8vo. 3 volumes in 1: 249 (recte 247),(8 tables),(7 index),(1 privilegium),(1 blank);(1 privilegium),(1 blank) p. Ad 2: 35,(3), folding table, (2 blank) p. Ad 3: 207,(1 errata) p. Vellum 16.5 cm <De la bibliothèque de la famille Bigot, normande et originaire du Perche, célèbre dans toute lEurope savante du xviie siècle> (Ref: Ad 2: STCN PPN 840292457; cf. Brunet 2,2; cf Graesse 2,155; cf. Ebert 4242, all three refer to an edition Rome 1608. Ad 3: Schweiger 2,829; Graesse 5,450; Ebert 17968, all 3 record erroneously that Fr. Tiliobroga (Lindenbrogius) is the editor. See the note below) (Details: Two thongs laced through the joints. Three short titles on the back. Ad 2: Woodcut printer's mark of Plantin on the title. At the end a folding plate, printed in red and black, of an inscription. See the note below) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Engraved bookplate on the front pastedown. Small ownership inscription on the pastedown of the lower board) (Note: Ad 1: The French Jesuit Jean-Baptiste Beau, latinized as Joannes Baptista Bellus, 1602-1670, was professor of humanities and rhetoric in Toulouse, and rector of the Collège des Jésuites at Rodez. He was from Cavarum oppidum, i.e. Avignon. The Cavares are in ancient geography a Gallic tribe, located in the lower Rhone valley. Close neighbours were the Salyes, or Salyi, a powerful military tribal confederation that occupied the plain of the Druentia (Durance) in southern Gaul. § The first treatise examines the sacred precinct of the 'templum augurale' in ancient authors. The second treatise is a dialogue on the date of the battle of Pharsalus in Central Greece, the decisive battle of Caesar's Civil War. On 9 August 48 BC Caesar and his allies lined up opposite the army of the republic under the command of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, Pompey the Great, and won. Ad 2: The Spanish archaeologist Petrus Ciacconius Toletanus, or Pedro Chacon of Toledo,1525/27-1581, was canon at Toledo, and is best known for his treatise on Roman dining 'De triclinio Romano', Rome 1588. He should be even more remembered for this important monograph on the inscription on the base of a rostral column (columna rostrata) which was discovered in 1565 in the neighbourhood of the arch of Septimius Severus in the Forum Romanum. (ILLRP 319). This column, adorned with the rams, the 'rostra', of enemy ships, was erected to commemorate the victory in 260 of Consul Caius Duilius, who inflicted the first naval defeat on Hannibal near Mylae in Sicily. The inscription, a kind of elogium, was inscribed on the base of the column. Duilius, a hero of the first Punic war, was the first Roman to gain a naval triumph. § The treatise was first published in 1586. The textual 'restorations proposed by scholars, while of course conjectural, are based on the testimony of Polybius and later historians, as well as on spatial requirements. Most of those accepted since Ritschl (1862) and Mommsen (1863, on CIL 1,1.195) go back to a much earlier Spanish editor P. Chacon (Rome 1586)' (A.E. Gordon, Illustrated Introduction to Latin Epigraphy, Berkeley etc., 1983, no. 48, p. 124/126, which offers an extensive description, commentary, text and translation) Ad 3: Marcus Valerius Probus, ca. 20/30-105 AD, was a Roman grammarian and critic, who flourished during Nero's reign. He devoted himself to the criticism and elucidation of the texts of classical authors (especially the most important Roman poets) by means of marginal notes or by signs, after the manner of the Alexandrine grammarians. In this way he treated Horace, Lucretius, Terence and Persius. His lectures were preserved in the notes taken by his pupils. We possess by him part of a treatise De notis, probably an excerpt from a larger work. It contains a list of abbreviations used in official and historical writings (especially proper names), in laws, legal pleadings and edicts. (Source on Probus Wikipedia) This Probus edition was produced by an anonymous editor, who was an older(?) friend (iuvenis iam olim mihi amicus) of Fridericus Tiliobroga (Lindenbrogius), 1573-1648. He thanks him in the introductory Lectori for his assistance and contributions. § The first 57 pages contain the text of Probus, p. 58/91 contain the Notae iuris a Magnone collectae. Who this Magno was is not clear. This title first pops up at the end of an edition of the Codex Theodosianus, Lyon 1566, edited by Jacobus Cuiacius, where we read at the beginning of this section: Haec iuris sêmeia libens Rex accipe, Carle,/ Offert devotus quae tibi Magno tuus. In 1797 the editor Faustinus Arevalus suggested (in his Isidorus edition) to read Offert devotus quae tibi, Magne, tuus. Arevalus thinks that Magne was erroneously replaced by Magno, and that someone thought that this was the name of the author of the notes, putans hoc esse auctoris nomen. The pages 92 up to 151 contain the notes of Petrus Diaconus. p. 152-175: Notarum veterum explanatio ex Papiae glossario; p. 176-191 Notarum iuridicarum explanatio ex veteribus membranis) (Provenance: 17th century armorial bookplate of L.E. Bigot. § French bookplates of the first half of the 17th century are extremely rare. 'Les ex-libris français sont encore assez rares durant cette période (1600-1650), pour que nous croyions devoir donner la liste de tous ceux que nous avons pu étudier, et la description de quelques-uns'. The Bigots were 'une famille de magistrats normands bibliophiles', of which family this Louis Emeric Bigot is the most famous. 'Emeric Bigot était né en 1626. Il fut le grand bibliophile de son temps, le plus curieux, le mieux informé. Il avait tous les auteurs grecs et latins très-bien conditionnés, quantité de petits livres rares sur des matières singulières, et des pièces fugitives qu'on aurait eu peine à rencontrer ailleurs. (...) Pour empêcher la dispersion de sa bibliothèque estimée à 40.000 livres, il la substitua dans sa famille. A sa mort, elle fut confiée à Robert Bigot, sieur de Montville, conseiller au Parlement de Paris, avec un fonds considérable pour l'augmenter annuellement. (...) Après le décès de Robert Bigot, tous les trésors littéraires amassés par cette famille furent acquis en bloc par les libraires, et se vendirent à Paris, le 1er juin 1706 et jours suivants, collège de Me Gervais, rue du Foin; on en a le catalogue in-12 en cinq parties'. (See bmlisieux.com/curiosa/poulet02.htm). More on Emeric Bigot in 'histoire-bibliophilie.blogspot.nl/2015_10_01_archive.html) § On the pastedown of the lower board the manuscript name: Demigieu, 1768. The next owner of this book was the Marquis Anthelme-Michel-Laurent de Migieu, 1723-1788, a wellknown French bibliophile and manuscript collector. His huge library was dispersed too) (Collation: Ad 1: A-Q8, R4 (leaf R4 verso blank), chi1 (leaf chi1 verso blank) (leaf chi1 is a cancel for leaf R4, they both contain corrigenda and the privilegium. Chi1 adds some corrections to the corrigenda. The binder forgot to remove leaf R4) Ad 2: A-B8, C4 (leaf C4 blank, a folding table inserted between leaf C3 and C4). Ad 3: A-N8) (Photographs on request)
Book number: 120410 Euro 450.00

Keywords: (Oude Druk), (Rare Books), Epigraphik, Inschriften, Latin linguistics, Lucanus, Lukan, Pharsalia, Probus, Roman history, Roman religion, antike altertum antiquity, epigraphy, inscriptions, lateinische Sprachwissenschaft, römische Geschichte, römische Religion
€ 450,00

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